Chevrolet

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Posted by kaori 03/31/2009 @ 04:09

Tags : chevrolet, cars, leisure

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Volt shows electric car can be powerful, sporty - Detroit Free Press
By MARK PHELAN • FREE PRESS AUTO CRITIC • May 18, 2009 General Motors drove a stake through the notion that environmentally friendly electric cars can't also be fun and sporty in a brief test drive of the company's Chevrolet Volt powertrain this...
Windward Chevrolet dealer to be closed next year - CNBC
HONOLULU - Servco Auto Windward is confirming that its Chevrolet dealer agreement with General Motors will not be renewed after October 2010. The dealership received a letter from GM informing it of the change. General Motors is pushing to close 1100...
Salisbury Chevrolet owner determined to keep franchise open - Schenectady Gazette
By Kathy Bowen (Contact) Dan Carlton, general manager of Salisbury Chevrolet in Glenville, talks during a news conference at the Freeman's Bridge Road dealership Monday. Salisbury owner Anna Gerrity looks on. GLENVILLE — Salisbury Chevrolet owner Anna...
Review: 2010 Chevrolet Camaro - Automobile Magazine
By Don Sherman Don't count on the Chevrolet Volt to rescue General Motors. The extended-range electric car is a fascinating science project and great for wowing policy makers, but few car enthusiasts are that committed to saving the planet....
Andrews Chevrolet to Appeal the Loss of General Motors Franchise - Courier Herald
By STEPHANIE MILLER Frank Andrews Chevrolet is not going down without a fight. Andrews was one of more than 1000 dealers notified Friday by General Motors Corporation that it is on a list to be eliminated. Several calls to Andrews Chevrolet today and...
Area GM dealers apparently safe - Ventura County Star
Employees afraid of losing their jobs at William L. Morris Chevrolet in Fillmore spent most of Friday morning anxiously waiting for the FedEx delivery driver to arrive, said owner Chap Morris. “When the FedEx truck came, my employees were out there and...
Colorado dealership on GM closure list fights back - BusinessWeek
Hajek (HIGH'-yek) Chevrolet in Longmont was one of about 1100 General Motors dealers receiving letters Friday that said the company would be dropping them by late next year. But the dealership plans to appeal the decision and is asking customers to...
Chevrolet dominate in Pau - Yahoo! Eurosport
Chevrolet dominated the World Touring Car Championship round in Pau as Robert Huff and Alain Menu took the race wins. In race one, Huff took his second win in three races after the man from Cambridgeshire capitalised on a mistake from pole sitter...
Lowe's: Chevrolet NASCAR Truck Race Quotes - PaddockTalk
Rick Ren and all the guys made this Longhorn Chevrolet haul butt today and if you need to drive anything, get to your local Chevrolet dealer and drive one of these things, they are fast.” “I had my boss on the radio, Kevin (Harvick) and he kept telling...
Moore Chevrolet still going strong - Norristown Times Herald
CONSHOHOCKEN - Moore Chevrolet in Conshohocken, despite and erroneous report in the Saturday print edition of The Times Herald, is still going strong. The dealership, located at 12th Avenue and Fayette Street, has been in business since 1912,...

Chevrolet

Chevrolet Logo

Chevrolet (IPA: /ˌʃɛvroʊˈleɪ/ - French origin) (also known as Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors. It is the top selling GM marque, with "Chevrolet" or "Chevy" being at times synonymous with GM. Chevrolet offers 18 vehicles and many different enhanced versions in its home market. The vehicles range from subcompact cars to medium duty commercial trucks. Its number one seller in the United States is the Silverado pickup. Chevrolet continues to be the performance, price, fuel economy, and value leader for General Motors North America.

Chevrolet was founded by Louis Chevrolet (Swiss-French) and William C. Durant (American). Louis Chevrolet was a race-car driver, and William Durant, founder of General Motors, had been forced out of GM in 1910. He wanted to use Chevrolet's designs to rebuild his own reputation. As head of Buick Motor Company, prior to founding GM, Durant had hired Chevrolet to drive Buicks in promotional races.

Chevrolet first used its "bowtie" logo in 1913. It is said to have been designed from wallpaper Durant once saw in a French hotel. More recent research by historian Ken Kaufmann presents a compelling case that the logo is based from a logo for "Coalettes".

In 1915, Durant was in the process of setting up Chevrolet production facilities in Toronto, Canada. Later that year, during a luncheon meeting in New York with "Colonel Sam" McLaughlin, whose McLaughlin Motor Car Company manufactured McLaughlin-Buick cars, it was agreed that Chevrolets with McLaughlin-designed bodies would be added to the Canadian company's product line. Three years later, the two Canadian operations (Chevrolet was by then a part of GM in the United States) were bought by GM to become General Motors of Canada Ltd.

By 1916, Chevrolet was profitable enough to allow Durant to buy a majority of shares in GM. After the deal was completed in 1917, Durant was president of General Motors, and Chevrolet was merged into GM, becoming a separate division. In the 1918 model year, Chevrolet introduced the Model D, a V8-powered model in four-passenger roadster and five-passenger tourer models. These cars had 288in3 35 hp (26 kW) engines with Zenith carburetors and three-speed transmissions.

Famous Chevy models include the large and luxurious Impala (1958) Aluminum engines were in the air-cooled (rear-engined) Corvair and Vega. Chevrolet had a great influence on the American automobile market during the 1950s and 1960s. In 1957, Chevy made the first fuel injected engine. In 1963, one out of every ten cars sold in the United States was a Chevrolet.

The basic Chevrolet small-block V-8 design has remained in continuous production since its debut in 1955, longer than any other mass-produced engine in the world, although current versions share few if any parts interchangeable with the original. Descendants of the basic small-block OHV V-8 design platform in production today have been much modified with advances such as aluminum block and heads, electronic engine management and sequential port fuel injection, to name but a few. The small block Chevrolet V-8 is used in current production model (2008) Impala sedans, a variety of light and medium duty Chevrolet trucks, and the current generation Corvette sports car. Depending on the vehicle type, they are built in displacements from 4.8 to 7.0 litres with outputs ranging from 295 to 638 horsepower (476 kW) as installed at the factory. It will also be used as a performance option in the forthcoming (2010 model year) revival of the Chevrolet Camaro. The engine design has also been used over the years in GM products built and sold under the Pontiac. Oldsmobile, Buick, Opel (Germany) and Holden (Australia) nameplates. Recently, a 6-litre, 400 horsepower (300 kW) version of the small-block V-8 designed initially for the C-6 Corvette has been installed in a factory-built high performance version of the Cadillac CTS sedan known as the CTS-V.

Even though the Australian market of today mainly consists of Australia's own automotive companies alongside Asian and European automobile brands, Australia once had its fair share of American cars as well. For many decades up until the very early 1960s, Chevrolet cars were manufactured and sold in Australia in the Chevrolet brand in the state of South Australia. Vintage Chevrolet models such as Bel Air, Impala etc, are still found in many states around Australia. Manufacturing has now ceased, and to this day has been succeeded by Dodge, Jeep, and Chrysler in terms of American Cars. The 1998-2001 Chevrolet Suburban was branded under GM Holden for sale within Australia. Today several of Chevrolet's designs are based on their Australian counterparts (GM Holden). Chevrolet is expanding its availability of large pick ups and SUV's in the Australian Market.

Historically, many Latin American-market vehicles from GM were modified derivatives of older models from GM's North American and European operations. The current S10 and Blazer exemplify this strategy. However, more modern vehicles are now being marketed as market conditions change and competition increases. Besides those older models made in Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia and Mercosur countries, Korean sourced cars from former Daewoo factories some markets also get German Opel and US made Chevrolet on top of their local line-ups.

In Brazil, the Chevrolet Opala was based on the German Opel Rekord from the late 1960s, continuing in production until the early 1990s, when it was replaced by a version of the Opel Omega. Other smaller Chevrolets in Brazil, such as the Kadett and Monza, were based on the Opel Kadett and Ascona respectively. Chevrolet's product line-up in Brazil now comprises some exclusive designs like the Corsa "B" based Celta sold in Argentina under the Suzuki brand, the Astra, and a brand new, Brazilian designed Vectra based on the current Opel Astra, while the current Corsa is built and the Omega name is now used on the Holden Commodore. Utility and four wheel drive vehicles line-up includes the S10, the Blazer, and the Montana. The Montana is a compact pickup truck, based on the Corsa, that is also sold in other Latin American markets. From the 1960s to the mid-1980s, there was also a large station wagon, derived from the C10 truck (somewhat similar to the Suburban), called the Veraneio.

Chevrolet production in Chile began in 1962, although at first through local partners (in this case, Avayu with the Nova II). GM still assembles the Isuzu D-Max as LUV D-Max in Arica and Isuzu´ F and N series in Huechuraba, Santiago.

Chevrolet has been operating in Ecuador for 80 years. GM Ecuador sells US Chevrolets alongside GM Daewoo and Opel sourced models. It also sells the 1983 Suzuki Supercarry under the Chevrolet namel, and the Isuzu Rodeo was sold as the Chevrolet Rodeo throughout the 1990s.

In Venezuela, Chevrolet has been operating since 1948, when truck production began in Caracas. In 1979 production moved to a plant in Valencia that was purchased from Chrysler. Chevrolet assembled more than 1,500,000 vehicles in its first 50 years in Venezuela.

In 1924 General Motors starts importing Chevrolet Double Phaeton models and are welcomed with great demand.

In 1925, in order to reduce costs in the Argentine market, General Motors decides to manufacture in Argentina and starts producing a sedan, roadster, a truck chassis and the Chevrolet Double Phaeton now called "Especial Argentino", a model exclusively designed for the Argentinean market. Sales increased and soon the Oldsmobile, Oakland and Pontiac units were incorporated to the assembly line.

When the Second World War broke out the operations were complicated. In 1941 the Chevrolet 250.000 is made, but the shortage of products made car production impossible. The last Chevrolet goes out of the plant in august, 1942. In order to avoid the total stoppage, the company made electrical and portable refrigerators and car accessories amongst other items. After the war, GM started producing the Oldsmobile and Pontiac lines and later Chevrolet is added.

In 1959, manufacturing plants are enlarged and set up to produce cars, pick ups and trucks. On 25 January 1960 the first Argentinean pick up Chevrolet is introduced. The following year the national government approves the investment plan for 45 million dollars which included a plant of 12,000 m2. On 12th march 1962 the first Chevrolet 400 is made based on the North American Chevy II. The original plan considered a national integration of 50% during the first year of production, this amount must get to be 90% in 1964 with a production of 15,000 units. By 1969, the Chevy line, derived from the American Chevy Nova is presented.

In the middle of the seventies, General Motors market share is reduced sharply from 9% in 1976 to 2% in 1978. Losses exceeded the 30 millions dollars and the head company in the USA decides to halt the productive activities in Argentina.

The Chevrolet trade mark reappears in 1985 for the production of the pick up in its versions C-20 and D-20. In 1995 a plan for the manufacturing destined to the exportation specially to Brazil and other countries of Mercosur is materialized with the building of a new facility near Rosario, Santa Fe for the production of the Opel based Chevrolet Corsa and the Suzuki based Chevrolet Grand Vitara 4x4.

Mexico has a mix of Chevrolet models from different GM brands and platforms but branded as Chevrolet. The variety of models comes from Chevrolet USA, Opel Europe, and other origins. Examples of Opel Sourced vehicles are the Vectra, the Astra, the Meriva and the Captiva. Mexico also has some cars of its own, such as the Chevy C2, which is a reworked previous generation Corsa. Vehicles based on US platforms are the Avalanche, the Suburban, the Equinox, the Tahoe, the Cheyenne (which is similar to the Silverado but with minor differences), the Aveo, the HHR, the Traverse, the Malibu and the Corvette. The Chevrolet Optra, assembled in South Korea by GM Daewoo, is also sold in Mexico. The european Epica is sold as a Business only vehicle.

Chevrolet Europe is a Swiss-based firm (in Zürich) that sells the rebranded products of GM Daewoo.

Until 2005, Chevrolet Europe sold a few models, mostly United States domestic market (USDM) models modified to suit European regulations. Among them were the Chevrolet Alero (which was a rebadged Oldsmobile Alero) and the Chevrolet Trans Sport (which was a Chevrolet Venture with the front end of the Pontiac Trans Sport). Among other models sold by Chevrolet Europe were the Camaro, the Beretta, the Corvette, the Blazer, and the TrailBlazer. The current generation of North American-built Chevrolet Impala V-8 sedans has also been available in Europe in recent years, marketed as both large family sedans and more economically-priced alternatives to Jaguars and BMWs as high performance executive cars. It was decided to sell the cars.

It was in 2005 that all the mainstream models from GM Daewoo were rebranded as Chevrolet in Europe (The ownership of the SUV models in the former Daewoo range had reverted back to ownership of Ssangyong by this time). However the Daewoo name was retained in South Korea and Vietnam. In the rest of the world, most Daewoo models have worn the Chevrolet badge since 2003. Exceptions include the use of the Suzuki badge in the United States and Canada, the Pontiac badge in Canada, the Holden badge in Australia and New Zealand, and the Buick badge in China for certain GM Daewoo models.

The Corvette and Cadillac is marketed in Europe through a separate distribution channel operated by Netherlands-based Kroymans Corporation Group. Kroymans Corp it is seeking court protection from creditors. Kroymans Corporation also sells Ford, Opel, Nissan, Saab, Volvo and other brands in Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium.Kroymans is going to concentrate only on the importing, distribution, marketing and car retail sales in the Netherlands.

Because the Chevrolet brand now represents value-driven cars in Europe, the Corvette name was made into a separate marque for Europe and Japan.

The Holden Commodore is badged as the Chevrolet Lumina in Thailand and the Middle East, as well as South Africa. The longer wheelbase Holden Statesman is sold as the Chevrolet Caprice in the Middle East.

In the Middle East, Chevrolet-badged cars, trucks, SUV's, and crossovers are sourced from GM Daewoo (in South Korea), GM in North America, and GM Holden (in Australia). The Middle East market has a separate division called Chevrolet Special Vehicles (CSV), which (as of December 2007) sources the high-performance 400 bhp (300 kW) CR8 sedan from Holden Special Vehicles.

In Pakistan, Chevrolet introduced its cars in collaboration with a local automobile manufacturer called Nelus Automotive. The current models available are the Chevrolet Optra and Chevrolet Joy. As of December 2005, the Chevrolet Joy is being assembled locally in Pakistan.By 2008 Chevrolet launched their own website and added the Chevrolet Aveo and Chevrolet Colorado.

Chevrolet is among the newest brands in India launched by GM's india operations. Until June 6, 2003 (the official birthday of Chevrolet), GM India (which was originally a joint venture with Hindustan Motors) sold the Opel Corsa, Opel Astra, and the Opel Vectra. The Corsa and Astra were built at a plant in Halol, Gujarat.

Since then, Chevrolet currently sells the Chevrolet Optra, Chevrolet Aveo, Chevrolet Tavera, Chevrolet SRV , Chevrolet Spark and Chevrolet Aveo U-VA. The Chevrolet Forester, a rebadged Subaru, was imported directly from Fuji Heavy Industries in Japan until 2005. The Optra and Tavera are built at the Halol plant. The latest Chevrolet launched in India is the Chevrolet Captiva SUV, a rebadged Holden Capitva.

Chevrolet also is the sole Engine supplier for the Formula Rolon single seater series in India.

The American-built Chevrolet Colorado pickup is also manufactured in Rayong, Thailand.

General Motors is currently exploring cost cutting options as part of its restructuring plan. One of these options involve expanding the Rayong, Thailand plant to add additional capacity to export Colorado's to the U.S. This would allow the Shreveport, Louisiana plant to be closed (where the Colorado is also produced). This scenario is plausible only if a free-trade agreement is signed between the U.S. and Thailand, as the American tariff on imported pickup trucks from non-FTA countries is currently 25%. The United Auto Workers is the most vocal opponent to a change in the tariff structure.

In the mid 2000s, Suzuki imported and marketed the TrailBlazer and the Chevrolet Optra wagon in Japan. General Motors Asia Pacific (Japan) currently distributes and markets the Chevrolet TrailBlazer in very limited numbers. Suzuki, a GM partner, also assembles and markets the Chevrolet Cruze subcompact and the Chevrolet MW kei car. The MW was originally a rebadged Suzuki Wagon R. As of 2008, it is a rebadged Suzuki Solio. Mitsui currently distributes and markets the Chevrolet Tahoe, Chevrolet Express, Chevrolet HHR, and Starcraft versions of the G-Van and Chevrolet Trailblazer. General Motors Japan directly imports and distributes the Corvette, which is marketed under its own marque. Thus there are three distinct distribution channels for Chevrolet-branded vehicles, and a separate network for Corvette-branded cars.

Chevrolet-branded vehicles are not sold in South Korea. However, many global-market Chevrolet vehicles are sourced from GM Daewoo of South Korea.

In South Africa, Chevrolet was GM's main brand name until 1982, with a number of Vauxhall Motors and Holden derivatives being built under the Chevy name from 1964. In the 1970s, the advertising jingle "braaivleis, rugby, sunny skies and Chevrolet" (adapted from the US "Baseball, Hot Dogs, Apple Pies and Chevrolet") came to epitomise the ideal lifestyle of white male South Africans. Holden in Australia used the jingle "Football, Meat Pies, Kangaroos and Holden cars". Originally, Chevrolets were CKD kits of US models assembled in their plant in Port Elizabeth. However, since South Africa was right-hand drive and the US was left-hand drive, along with encouragement by the South African government to use local content, Chevrolets such as the Biscayne were eventually made entirely in South Africa, along with GM's "own car for South Africa": the Ranger.

By the 1970s, larger South African Chevrolets were based on Holden models, the Kommando being based on the Kingswood and the Constantia on the Premier, while the smaller Firenza was based on the Vauxhall Viva. The Chevrolet Nomad sold in South Africa was entirely different from the Nomad sold in America; whereas the American Nomad was originally conceived as a station wagon version of the Corvette and eventually became the station wagon version of the Bel Air, the South African Nomad was an SUV of truck proportions before SUVs were popular.

However, these were replaced by Opel models like the Rekord, Commodore, and Senator, and in 1982 the Chevrolet brand name was dropped in favour of Opel. Because of the political climate at the time, GM decided to divest from South Africa in 1986, and a local group eventually bought out GM's South African operations (including the Port Elizabeth plant) and renamed the company as the Delta Motor Corporation, which concentrated on Opels, Isuzus, and Suzukis, built under licence.

However, thanks to an improved political climate in the 1990s, GM decided to reenter South Africa, eventually buying out the whole of Delta. In 2001, the Chevrolet name made a comeback, used on the Lumina, a rebadged Holden Commodore, and later on, on the Daewoo range of cars. Current Chevrolets include the Spark (a rebadged Daewoo Matiz), Aveo, Optra, the Lumina (including the Ute model), and the Vivant, an MPV that is a rebadged version of the Daewoo Tacuma.

In Russia, various Chevrolet models are available. Current Chevrolets include the Spark, Aveo, Lanos, Lacetti, Rezzo, Epica, Captiva, TrailBlazer, and Tahoe. All of these models (with the exception of the TrailBlazer and Tahoe) are rebadged Daewoo models.

The Chevrolet brand is currently undergoing a product restructuring in North America along with all other GM brands in order to fit into the parent company's turnaround efforts. General Motors is now also trying to have Chevrolet have more efficient vehicles. Since the 2007 hiatus of the Monte Carlo, there is an unknown status as of March 2009. At the 2009 Detroit Auto Show, the production version of the Chevrolet Beat was displayed under the nameplate of Spark; General Motors announced that the Spark along with the Chevrolet Orlando would go into production in the US. The Orlando will be a successor. Along with the Spark and Orlando General Motors will introduce two more models: plug-in electric Chevrolet Volt; and the Chevrolet Cruze,successor to the Cobalt.

In 2007, Chevrolet launched its first watch collection under the Louis Chevrolet watch brand. The watch collection pays tribute to Louis Chevrolet, co-founder of the brand, who was born in a family of a watchmaker and in his childhood helped his father at the workbench. The collection was called Frontenac, the name inherited from the race car company founded by Louis Chevrolet. The Chevrolet watch collection comprises automatic, manually-wound and quartz models, equipped with ETA and Ronda movements.

The Louis Chevrolet Frontenac watches, manufactured in Courgenay, the Swiss Jura region, feature the styling cues suggested by the Chevrolet cars. The collection was developed while applying the same materials as used in the car industry. Pearled appliques on the Chevrolet watches' dials remind the metal forms of the old dashboards. The number '8,' Chevrolet's racing number, is sported on the case back.

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Chevrolet Monte Carlo

2006-2007 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

The Chevrolet Monte Carlo was an American-made automobile. Originally introduced by Chevrolet for the 1970 model year (as competition with the Ford Thunderbird), it has gone through six generations as of 2007. All Monte Carlos to date have been two-door personal luxury coupes, closely based on a contemporary mid-sized sedan.

The Monte Carlo was originally created by Scott Butler as Chevrolet's counterpart to the new G-body Pontiac Grand Prix, which had been introduced to great success for 1969. For the 1968 model year, GM had instituted a split-wheelbase policy for its A-body intermediate cars: 112 in (2845 mm) for two-door models, 116 in (2946 mm) for sedans and station wagons. The Grand Prix was a two-door coupe riding a special 118 in (2997 mm) version of the A-platform (known as the "G-body "). Rather than add the extra length within the body to increase passenger space (as was customary on sedans) the G-body (also known as the A-body Special) spliced the extra length between the firewall and the front wheels, creating an unusually long hood. The look was very successful, and the new Grand Prix greatly outsold its larger, B-body predecessor despite higher prices.

The Monte Carlo was the brainchild of Elliot M. (Pete) Estes, general manager of Chevrolet, and Chevrolet's chief stylist, Dave Holls. They modeled the styling on the contemporary Cadillac Eldorado, although much of the body and structure were shared with the Chevrolet Chevelle (firewall, windshield, decklid, and rear window were the same), adding new front end sheetmetal, wider C-pillars, and new rear fenders. Bulges were added to the fenders to create a more muscular appearance. The Monte Carlo also had the then-fashionable concealed windshield wipers.

A mid-1990s article in Chevrolet High Performance stated that the first generation Monte Carlo was known to Chevrolet brass under the working name Concours (a usual practice where all Chevrolet models started with a "C"). At one point, the proposal called for a formal coupe, sedan, and convertible. It has been noted that the sedan resembled a full-size Oldsmobile 98 prior to the use of the GM G platform with at least one photo showing the pull-up door handles that would be introduced on the 1970 1/2 Camaro and 1971 full-sized Chevys, but not appear on Monte Carlos until the second-generation model debuted in 1973.

Though the Monte Carlo was developed at Chevrolet under the leadership of Pete Estes, it was formally introduced in September, 1969 by John Z. DeLorean, who succeeded Estes as Chevrolet's general manager earlier in the year after previously heading the Pontiac division, where he led the development of the similar-bodied 1969 Grand Prix introduced the previous model year.

The standard powertrain was the 350 CID (5.7 L) Chevrolet "Turbo-Fire" small-block V8 with a two-barrel carburetor, rated at 250 hp (186 kW) (gross) @ 4500 rpm and 345 ft·lbf (468 N·m) of torque @ 2800 rpm, mated to a Turbo Hydramatic 350 Transmission. Front disc brakes were standard equipment. The dashboard was basically identical to the Chevelle except for fake wood trim, according to Holls a photographic reproduction of the elm trim used by Rolls-Royce, and higher grade nylon (or vinyl) upholstery and deep-twist carpeting were used. Base priced at US$3,123, the Monte Carlo cost $218 more than a comparable Chevelle Malibu.

Various options were available. A two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission (on 350 CID engines only), three-speed Turbo-Hydramatic, or a four-speed manual; most Monte Carlos carried the Turbo-Hydramatic. Variable-Ratio Power Steering, power windows, Four Season Air Conditioning, power seats, Rallye wheels, Strato bucket seats, center console, full instrumentation, and various other accessories were also available, bringing the price of a fully equipped Monte Carlo to more than $5,000.

Optional engines included the four-barrel carbureted Turbo-Fire 350 CID small block V8, rated at 300 hp (224 kW) @ 4800 rpm and 380 ft·lbf (515 N·m) @ 3200 rpm, the Turbo-Fire 400 (400 CID/6.5 L) with a two-barrel carburetor, rated at 265 hp (198 kW) @ 4800 rpm and 400 ft·lbf (542 N·m) @ 7800 rpm, and the Turbo-Jet 400 (402 CID/6.6 L) with a four-barrel carburetor, rated at 330 hp (246 kW) @ 4800 rpm and 410 ft·lbf (515 N·m) @ 9200 rpm). Note that the two Chevrolet 400 CID V8s offered this year were actually two different designs. The two-barrel carbureted Turbo-Fire 400 was a Small Block Chevrolet V8 engine, similar, but very different internally, to the 350, while the Turbo-Jet 400 was a slightly enlarged version of the 396 CID big block V8 and had an actual displacement of 402 CID.

The most sporting option was the Monte Carlo SS 454 package. Priced at $420, it included a standard Turbo-Jet 454 of 454 CID (7.4 L) with a four-barrel carburetor, rated at 360 hp (269 kW) @ 4800 rpm and 500 ft·lbf (678 N·m) of torque @ 3500 rpm. It also included heavy-duty suspension, wider tires, "SS 454" badging, and an automatic load-leveling rear suspension. The Turbo-Hydramatic transmission (with a 3.31 rear axle) was a mandatory option with the SS package, although it still cost $222 extra. Weighing only a bit more than a comparably equipped Chevelle SS 454, the Monte Carlo SS was quite a fast car, although it accounted for less than 3% of Monte Carlos sold in 1970.

A labor strike at Chevrolet's Flint, Michigan assembly plant (where most Monte Carlo production was scheduled) during the early months of the 1970 model year immediately following the car's introduction on September 18, 1969 limited overall model-year sales to 145,976, short of the 185,000 projected. During those early months, Monte Carlos were in short supply with full-production not getting underway until February, 1970, leaving many would-be prospects disappointed after going to their Chevrolet dealers and finding no Monte Carlos in stock. However, once full production got underway, Monte Carlos sold briskly and mostly at full list price (usually loaded with options), making it a very profitable model for Chevy and its dealerships. Only 3,823 of the 1970 Monte Carlos were SS 454s.

The 1971 model year saw only modest styling changes. Inside, the SS model got new "European symbol knobs", and a four-spoke steering wheel became optional. Mechanically, it was largely unchanged, although the small-block Turbo-Fire 400 two-barrel engine was dropped. Other engines had compression ratios lowered to allow the use of regular leaded, low-lead, or unleaded gasoline, per a GM corporate edict. Engine ratings fell to 245 hp (183 kW) for the base Turbo-Fire 350 CID (5.7 L) two-barrel, 270 hp (201 kW) for the Turbo-Fire 350-4V, and 300 hp (224 kW) for the Turbo-Jet 400. The SS 454 engine was actually raised to a nominal 365 gross hp (272 kW) despite the reduction in compression ratio. This increase in horsepower was a result of the 454 engine using the more aggresive camshaft from the 390 hp 454 used in the 1970 Chevrolet Corvette and fullsized sedans.

There has been no documented case of a 1971 Monte Carlo SS car with the 425 hp (317 kW) LS-6 version of the 454, with solid valve lifters and a longer-duration camshaft, previously found in the 1970 Chevelle SS 454 (where it was rated at 450 hp (336 kW) however, they did come with an LS5 454. The Turbo Hydramatic officially remained the only transmission for the SS, but a heavy-duty clutch option on the order form suggests that it may have been possible to special-order a 454 LS-6 with a four-speed manual transmission (the four-speed wasn't listed officially as an "SS" option but was available as an RPO in regular Monte Carlos with the 350 and 400 engines). The exact number of such combinations, if any, is unknown since they were not officially listed as factory options but possibly assembled through Chevrolet's "Central Office Production Order" (COPO) process that had previously made possible model/engine combinations not officially available. However, there has never been a documented case of such a combination. Chevrolet records indicate that the factory only installed the LS-6 installations in Corvettes that year.

The SS 454 package would be discontinued after this year following production of only 1,919 units, but the 454 CID V8 engine would remain optional in Monte Carlos through 1975. The reason given for discontinuing the SS was that the Monte Carlo was marketed as a luxury vehicle instead of a muscle car. The SS nameplate would be resurrected 12 years later. Yet, at the same time that the Monte Carlo SS was judged a failure in the marketplace and discontinued, the Monte's reputation as a performance car on the race track was gaining strength because Ford and Chrysler were ending their factory-backed racing support due to declining muscle car sales and the need to divert dollars to meet costly Federal safety and emission regulations (General Motors' official policy had prohibited factory racing efforts since 1963). As factory support ended at Ford and Chrysler, the stock-car racing mantle switched to independent teams and sponsors, who overwhelmingly chose Chevrolets over Ford and Chrysler products due to Chevy's much greater availability and affordability of over-the-counter racing parts through the Chevy dealer network. And the Monte Carlo was considered the best suited Chevrolet model for stock car racing by most NASCAR teams due to its 116-inch (2,946 mm) wheelbase (only one inch above NASCAR's minimum requirements at that time, the Chevelle 2-doors had a shorter 112 inch wheelbase) and long-hood design which placed the engine further back in the chassis than most other vehicles for better weight traction. Thus the Monte Carlo became Chevy's standard-bearer for NASCAR from 1971 to 1989.

Like its 1970 predecessor, production of the 1971 Monte Carlo also got off to a slow start due to a labor strike, this time a 67-day corporate-wide walkout that coincided with the introduction of the 1971 models in September, 1970, leaving dealerships with only a small shipment of 1971 models (built before the strike) in stock until the strike was settled in mid-November, 1970 and then slow-going in reaching normal production levels until around January 1, 1971. Model-year production ended at 128,600 including the 1,919 SS models.

A Cadillac-like egg-crate grille similar to the 1971 Chevrolet Caprice and a metal rear trim molding highlighted the changes to the 1972 Monte Carlo, the final year for the first generation design. The SS was dropped, but a new Monte Carlo Custom option appeared as a one-year only, offering that included a special suspension and other items previously included with the SS option. Unlike the departed SS package, it was available with any engine on the roster.

In California, which had emissions standards more stringent than federal law, the 4-barrel carbureted 350 was the standard and only available engine. Also, the only transmission offered in California was the Turbo Hydramatic.

For 1972, the four-speed manual transmission was discontinued from the option list as a line in the Monte Carlo brochure describing its market position as a personal luxury car stated "Sorry, no four-on-the-floor." The standard three-speed manual and optional two-speed Powerglide automatic transmissions were offered only with the base 350 CID two-barrel engine, with the three-speed Turbo Hydramatic also available with this engine and a mandatory option with each of the optional engines.

Mechanically, the most significant change was that variable-ratio power steering became standard equipment for the first time.

Interior trim was relatively unchanged from 1971 other than the availability of all-vinyl upholstery with the standard bench seat in addition to the optional Strato bucket seats. Cloth interiors were also offered with both bench and bucket seats.

A redesigned Monte Carlo was introduced alongside other GM intermediates. Like other GM mid-size cars, the 1973 Monte Carlo was no longer a hardtop, but a pillared coupe with rear side opera windows and frameless door glass. Prominent styling features included dual headlights flanking an egg-crate grille with a Monte Carlo emblem in front and vertical taillights above the bumper. The front bumper was a large federally mandated 5 mph (8 km/h) bumper that was among the required 1973 federal safety standards for all passenger cars sold in the U.S. with the 5 mph (8 km/h) requirement extended to rear bumpers on 1974 models. Also new was a double-shell roof for improved noise reduction and rollover protection along with the flush-mounted pull-up exterior door handles first introduced on the 1970 1/2 Camaro and 1971 full-sized Chevrolets.

The separate body-on-frame construction carried over for 1973, as was the basic all-coil suspension.

For improved ride and handling, the 1973 Monte Carlo featured a number of innovations (for a large American car) such as standard radial-ply tires, Pliacell shock absorbers, high-caster steering, and front and rear anti-roll bars (previously offered only with the SS package). The standard Monte Carlo with manual transmission, retained "traditional" steering and bias-ply tires, but the radial-tuned system was included when the automatic transmission was ordered, earning the Monte Carlo S label.

A new model for 1973 was the Monte Carlo Landau, which was basically an "S" with a rear quarter Landau vinyl roof, Turbine II wheels and driver and passenger-side sport mirrors.

The interior of the 1973 Monte Carlo featured an all-new, wraparound cockpit-style instrument panel, similar to that found in some contemporary Pontiacs, Oldsmobiles and Buicks, in which gauges and various instruments were centered within easy reach of the driver. The simulated burl elm trim was retained. A split bench seat was standard, but "Strato Bucket" seats of a new design were optional, along with a floor console featuring an equally-new shifter with knob and button similar to Pontiac's Rally Sports Shifter replacing the Buick-like horseshoe shifter of previous years, and storage compartment. The bucket seats were of a one-piece high-back design with built-in headrests, and could swivel some 90 degrees to permit the driver and front passenger easier entry and exit. Cloth and vinyl trims were offered with both the bench and bucket seats.

The standard engine was a 145 (net) hp (108 kW) 350 CID (5.7 L) Turbo-Fire V8. Optional engines included a 175 (net) hp (30 kW) 350 CID V8 with a four-barrel carburetor and a four-barrel carbureted 454 CID Turbo-Jet V8 rated at 245 (net) hp (183 kW).

The 1973 Monte Carlo was named Motor Trend's "Car of the Year", due to its new styling and emphasis on Euro-style ride and handling. The 1973 Monte Carlo set a new sales record for Chevrolet, with nearly 250,000 sold for the model year.

The success of the Monte Carlo and Pontiac's similar Grand Prix led to several new personal luxury cars from competitors, including subsequent Mercury Cougar, the Ford Torino Elite, the Chrysler Cordoba and restyled Dodge Charger, and even high-line versions of the AMC Matador, which got a swoopy new coupe design for 1974.

The 1974 Monte Carlo received only minor detail changes from its 1973 predecessor, most notably a revised grille in the front and taller and slimmer vertical taillights in the rear, along with a relocated license plate and larger 5 mph (8 km/h) rear bumper.

The base Monte Carlo with manual transmission, standard suspension and bias-ply tires was discontinued, leaving only the "S" and "Landau" models equipped with radial-ply tires and upgraded suspensions along with standard power steering and front disc brakes.

A three-speed manual transmission was listed as standard equipment on 1974 "S" and "Landau" models equipped with the standard 350 CID V8, and an automatic transmission was a required option with the larger 400 and 454 CID V8s. However, a number of sources indicate that Chevrolet built virtually all 1974 Monte Carlos with the Turbo Hydra-Matic transmission.

The standard 350 CID Turbo-Fire V8 was again rated at 145 hp (108 kW) with two-barrel carburetor in 49 states. In California, the standard engine was a 350 Turbo-Fire V8 with a four-barrel carburetor rated at 160 hp (119 kW). Reappearing on the Monte's option list for the first time since 1970 was a 400 CID Turbo-Fire small block V8 rated at 150 hp (112 kW) with a two-barrel carburetor (not offered in California) or 180 hp (134 kW) with a four-barrel carburetor. The top engine was again the 454 CID Turbo-Jet big block V8 rated at 235 hp (183 kW) and was the only engine equipped with dual exhausts.

Despite the Arab Oil Embargo of late 1973 and early 1974 that greatly cut into sales of standard and intermediate-sized cars in favor of smaller compacts and imported subcompacts, the Monte Carlo went the other way on the sales charts by setting a new sales record this year of over 300,000 units despite the long lines at gas stations and record-high gasoline prices. The Monte Carlo continued to lead in intermediate personal luxury car sales with the Grand Prix placing second and the arrival of new competitors this year, including an upsized Mercury Cougar, Ford Torino Elite and AMC's Matador coupe. Chrysler would introduce its entries in this field for 1975 including the Chrysler Cordoba and redesigned Dodge Charger.

The 1975 Monte Carlo received only minor styling changes from the 1974 model, including a new grille with the Monte Carlo emblem moved to the center section and new vertically shaped taillights with horizontal louvers.

All models received catalytic converters to meet the latest federal and California emission requirements that included bonuses such as improved fuel economy and drivability, along with longer spark plug and muffler life, but required more expensive and lower-octane unleaded gasoline.

Engines were carryover from 1974 except for the addition of GM's High Energy electronic ignition being made standard equipment. However, power ratings for all engines were decreased due to the addition of the catalytic converter. The 454 CID V8 no longer offered on California cars, leaving the 400 CID four-barrel the top engine in the Golden State. The base 350 CID two-barrel was rated at 145 hp (108 kW) (standard in 49 states), the 350 CID 4-barrel was rated at 155 hp (116 kW) (availavble only in California), the 400 CID 4-barrel 175 hp (130 kW), and the 454 CID 4-barrel 215 hp (160 kW) (now equipped with single exhaust). A three-speed manual transmission was standard equipment with the base 350 CID V8 used in 49 states and California-only 350 four-barrel V8. The Turbo Hydra-Matic optional and a required option for the 400 and 454 V8s. Chevrolet sources, however, report that virtually all 1975 Monte Carlos were equipped with the Turbo Hydra-Matic transmission, which became standard equipment for 1976.

New for 1975 was a Custom interior option that included a plusher cloth 50/50 bench seat with recliner on passenger side and lower door panel carpeting. The standard interior still consisted of a bench seat with knit-cloth and vinyl or all-vinyl upholstery. The swiveling Strato bucket seats and console were still optional with knit cloth or vinyl upholstery. Also, white all-vinyl interiors were available for the first time this year with either bench or bucket seats with contrasting colors for carpeting and instrument panels including black, red, blue and green.

Sales dropped off a bit from 1974's record-setting pace due to higher prices resulting from the addition of the catalytic converter, double-digit inflation and new competition from Chrysler's Cordoba and Dodge's Charger SE. Monte Carlo production ended up at around 250,000 units but would rebound to set a new record in 1976.

A new crosshatch grille and vertically mounted rectangular headlamps, along with reshaped taillights identified the 1976 Monte Carlo (the reshaped taillight pattern was later incorporated into the fourth generation Monte Carlo). Under the hood, a new 140 hp (104 kW) 305 CID 2-barrel V8 became the standard engine with the 145 hp (108 kW) 350 2-barrel V8 and 175 hp (130 kW) 400 CID V8 both optional. California cars got a 165 hp (123 kW) 350 4-barrel as the base engine (not available in 49 states), and could be equipped with the 400 4-barrel V8. The big-block 454 CID V8 was discontinued from the option list this year. The Turbo Hydramatic transmission became standard equipment on all 1976 Monte Carlos.

Interior trims remained the same as 1975 with both base and Custom levels, but the instrument panel and steering wheel featured a new rosewood trim replacing the burled elm of previous years. A new option was a two-toned "Fashion Tone" paint combination.

Monte Carlo sales hit an all-time record with production of over 400,000 units this year.

A revised grille with the Monte Carlo "Knight's Crest" emblem moved to a stand-up hood ornament and revised taillight lenses marked the 1977 Monte Carlo, which was the last year for the 1973-vintage design before the introduction of a downsized 1978 Monte Carlo. Engine offerings were reduced to two engines for 1977. The base engine for 49 states was the 140 hp (104 kW) 305 CID 2-barrel V8 and the 170 hp (127 kW) 350 4-barrel V8 was optional (standard in California). The 400 cubic inch V8 was dropped as an engine option. The Turbo Hydra-matic transmission was included standard equipment.

Interior trim received only minor revisions this year with upholstery choices including cloth, velour and vinyl in both base and Custom trims.

This model year marks the only time in history when an intermediate model was larger in every dimension than a full-sized model, as the B-body Chevrolet Caprice/Impala had already been redesigned and downsized for 1977.

All GM intermediate-sized cars including the Monte Carlo were downsized for the 1978 model year in response to the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo and CAFE requirements. The 1978 model was 700-800 lb lighter and some 15 in shorter than the 1977 model. The 1978 model also had more interior and trunk space than the earlier 1977 model. The engine compartment was also smaller as the 350 and 400 V8s offered in previous years were dropped in favor of a standard 231 CID V6 built by Buick or an optional Chevrolet 305 CID V8. The three-speed manual transmission reappeared for the first time in several years as standard equipment on the base model with the V6 engine, and the automatic was optional. The optional V8 and all Landau models came standard with the automatic. A four-speed manual transmission with floor shifter was optional with the 305 V8, the first time a four-speed manual was offered on the Monte Carlo since 1971.

Only minor trim changes were made to the 1979 Monte Carlo, which included a slightly redesigned grille, tail lights & front park lights. Mechanical changes included a new Chevrolet-built 200 CID V6 (the ancestor of the Vortec 4300) as the standard engine for the base Monte Carlo in 49 states while the Buick 231 CID V6 remained standard on base models in California and all Landau models. A new 125 hp (93 kW) 267 CID V8 became optional and the 140 hp (104 kW) 305 CID V8 continued as an option but was joined by a 160 235 lb·ft (319 N·m) hp version with a four-barrel carburetor. The same transmissions were carried over from 1978, including a standard three-speed manual and optional four-speed manual, or an optional three-speed Turbo Hydramatic automatic. This would be the last year that Chevrolet would offer manual transmissions on the Monte Carlo due to extremely low buyer interest.

The car had a mild frontal restyle, with quad headlights and amber indicators mounted beneath. An automatic transmission became standard on all models and a new Chevrolet-built 229 CID V6 replaced both the 200 CID V6 of 1979 and the Buick engine offered on all 1978 models and the 1979 Landau as the standard engine in 49 states (California cars still got the Buick engine). A new option for 1980 was Buick's turbocharged version of the 231 CID V6 rated at 170 hp (127 kW). Other optional engines included 267 and 305 CID versions of the Chevrolet small-block V8 with up to 155 hp (116 kW).

The body was restyled with the other GM mid-size formal coupes (Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, Pontiac Grand Prix, Buick Regal). It featured a smoother profile than the previous models and new vertical taillights similar to the 1970 to 1977 models. Engine offerings were carried over, including the standard 229 CID Chevrolet V6 (231 CID Buick V6 in California) an optional 267 CID V8 (not available in California), a 305 CID V8 in the base and Landau models, and a turbocharged 170 hp (127 kW) 231 CID Buick V6 in the Monte Carlo Turbo. An automatic transmission, power steering and power front disc brakes were standard equipment. While this car was considered by some to be much better looking (and appeared more aerodynamic) than its Buick Regal, Pontiac Grand Prix, and Olds Cutlass cousins, only one team tried to make a go of it in NASCAR cup racing. While the big Monte Carlo was the dominant body style in the late 1970s, winning 30 or so races, the downsized (and cleaned-up) 1981 body would only take three checked flags in the 1981 and 1982 seasons when it was run.

Only mild revisions were made on the 1982 Monte Carlo. All engines, except for the turbocharged 231 CID V6, which was discontinued along with the Monte Carlo Turbo model, were carried over from 1981. New for 1982 were the additions of a 260 CID V6 and an Oldsmobile 350 CID V8, both of which were diesel engines. With the introduction of GM's new mid-size platform that saw the introduction of the Buick Century, Chevrolet Celebrity, Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera and Pontiac 6000, the chassis designations were shuffled up. The new mid-size cars were designated as A-body cars, whereas the cars previously designated as A-bodies were now called G-bodies. A black exterior was not offered in 1982.

The first year of the resurrection of the 1970-1971 SS model. Only 4,714 were produced.

The first SS model for this generation rolled off the assembly line in late 1983, offered for the 1984 model year. This model featured a smoothed off front end and became a hit with NASCAR teams, winning several races. The engine introduced for the SS was the L-69 305 cubic inch V8.This year is the most rare of this generation. And is the most wanted by collectors.

The SS was a hit not only in the car-buying public, (starving for some power after the hefty emissions regulations of the late 1970s) but also in NASCAR competition, where it continued to be a winning body style after the 1983 season successes. Production picked up, and 112,730 sport coupes were sold, and an additional 24,050 had the SS option (with an 180 hp (134 kW) 305 V8 that saw a 5 hp (4 kW) boost from the previous year), having an asking price of US$10,700. The Monte Carlo SS was available with Strato bucket seats and floor console as extra-cost options for the first time in place of the standard split bench seat with armrest. The regular Monte Carlo came standard with a 125 hp (93 kW) 229 CID V6 (231 CID V6 for California) and a 165 hp (123 kW) 305 V8 was optional. Available for the last year in a base Monte Carlo was the 350 CID diesel engine, and there were only 168 manufactured. All engines for 1984 got the three-speed automatic transmission with the exception of three SSs at the end of the 1984 production run that received the Turbo Hydromatic 200-4R transmission with overdrive.

In 1984 there were a limited number of Monte Carlo SSs made in Mexico, for Mexico sale. The differences are many in the Mexican to US/Canadian SSs. There was no rear spoiler. The rims are 14" checker style, an option on the base Monte Carlos in the US. The side mirrors are different style and black. The interior is that of a Grand Prix, in blue. The engine is however a 305, 165 hp (123 kW) contrary to popular belief that they came with a 350. They never were produced with a 350 or a 4 speed manual with hurst shifter.

T-tops were re-introduced (discontinued after the 1982 model year), and additional SS colors (Black, maroon and silver in addition to white), pinstriping, and options were made available. The (later to be highly sought after) medium blue ("gun metal") color for the SS was dropped. A four-speed automatic overdrive transmission, the Turbo Hydramatic 200-4R, with a revised sport rear axle ratio containing 3.73:1 gears became standard on the SS. Gone for good were the 229 CID V6 and 350 CID V8 diesel engines. Introduced in place of the 229 CID V6 was a 262 CID (4.3 L) V6 that was fuel-injected with throttle-body fuel injection. The V-8's were computer controlled quadrajet carb.

The 1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo, Chevy's rear-wheel-drive personal-luxury car, got more power, but for the first time since 1981, no diesel engine was offered in the Monte Carlo..

In the 1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo base model, the previously standard 3.8-liter Chevy V-6 gave way to a larger 4.3-liter V-6 with throttle-body fuel injection. That brought along 20 extra horsepower, for a new total of 130.

The optional 5.0-liter V-8 likewise gained some ponies, via a jump in compression ratio. It jumped from 150 horsepower to 165. The High Output 5.0-liter V-8 in the 1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS remained at 180 horsepower.

The V-6 and base V-8 could be backed by either a three- or four-speed automatic transmission, but the H.O. V-8 in the SS came only with the four-speed this year. Though the base coupe carried on visually unchanged, the SS was a different story. Previously offered only in white or dark blue metallic, color choices were expanded to include silver, maroon, and black. "Removable glass roof panels" (T-tops) came on board as a midyear option.

Despite its aging design, nearly 120,000 Monte Carlos found eager buyers in 1985. Though the total was down somewhat from 1984, the SS model saw sales climb from 24,050 to 35,484, a sure sign that performance was making a comeback.

Color choices for the 1985 Chevy Monte Carlo SS expanded from two to five, including this maroon hue.

For 1986, there were four distinct body styles available. The base model Sport Coupe was still available with the same general body panels that it had since 1981, but featured new "aero" side mirrors similar to those on Camaros and Corvettes of the 1980s . New for the 1986 model year was a Luxury Sport model that had a revised front fascia, new "aero" side mirrors, and an updated sleek-looking rear fascia. The LS front fascia included "Euro" headlamps with removable bulbs in a glass composite headlamp housing, versus the smaller sealed beam glass headlights of previous years. The rear bumper of the LS no longer had a "notch" between the bumper and trunk, and the taillights wrapped around so that they were visible from the sides of the car. The Super Sport model for 1986 incorporated the "aero" mirrors, yet still utilized the prior year's styling for the rear bumper.

In 1987, Chevrolet eliminated the Sport Coupe version of the Monte Carlo, leaving the LS, SS, and Aerocoupe. The Super Sport incorporated the "smoothed" rear bumper and tail lamps first introduced on the 1986 Luxury Sport. The Aerocoupe made up 6,052 of the 39,251 total Super Sports that were produced that year. 39,794 Luxury Sports were produced in 1987.

This was the last year for the fourth generation Monte Carlo. The 1988 models were actually built in late 1987, with only 16,204 SSs made for an asking price of US$14,320. Appearance and mechanicals were similar to the 1987 model. The SS model came from the factory with 180 hp (134 kW). The 1988 model only came with the lay-down style spoiler, unlike the 1987 model, which came with either the lay-down or stand-up type spoiler. The Aerocoupe did not return, as Chevrolet had unveiled plans to produce the Lumina and race that body style in NASCAR. The new Lumina body style was much more aerodynamic and negated the need for a "sleeker" version of the Monte Carlo SS. The Lumina coupe was introduced as a 1990 model as a Monte Carlo replacement. Total production numbers for the final year of the rear-wheel drive Monte Carlo was 30,174 - almost half of the 1987 numbers.

The final G-body Monte Carlo - a silver SS coupe - was produced on December 12, 1987. Total SS production for '88 was 16,204.

The rear bumper assembly is the first indication of year the SS. Two different styles were designed. The early style (83-86) had a rear taillamp that was contained in a black trim frame, and the rear bumper was fitted with a black trim strip across the top. Also, the trunk-mounted spoiler was the "stand-up" style - more of a vertical stance spoiler. The '87 - '88 SS's were fitted with a body-molding rear bumper without the top strip, and the taillight lens was redesigned to form with the back of the fender. The '87 model year saw the introduction of the "lay-down" style spoiler, which was more aerodynamic and 'modern-looking'. About half of the '87 SSs received the "lay-down" style spoiler, while the other half received the older "stand-up" style. There does not appear to be a definitive changeover point as there are reported VIN sequences with both styles showing up. However, the '88 model only received the "lay-down" style spoiler.

The '83 - '85 SS cars had "bullet-style" door mirrors. Rounded and more forward-facing, they looked less 'modern' than the "aero-style" mirrors that came with the '86 - '88 SS cars, which are more triangular and rearward-facing.

Gone was the gun-metal blue that adorned some '84 SSs, replaced with a maroon/orange scheme for '85. All '83 1/2 - '84 SSs came either in white or blue, with the interiors following suit. 85 - 88's were offered in white, black, maroon, and silver. The font, or letter-style for the striping changed as well. The '83 - '84 SS's had a computerized, "phased" font, with the Monte Carlo name in upright, rounded letters. The '85 - '86 SSs had a sloped font in a single line. '87 - '88 SS's had similar font lettering, but with the 'Monte Carlo' being placed below the "SS" script rather than beside it. Various engine components and transmissions were added to the diversity of the car throughout the generation.

For the 1995 model year, the mid-size Lumina was split into two models with the sedan continuing as the Lumina and the coupe reviving the Monte Carlo nameplate for its fifth generation. The new car rode on an updated W-body chassis shared with the Lumina, Pontiac Grand Prix, Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, Oldsmobile Intrigue, Buick Century and Buick Regal, and by its nature was the first front-wheel drive Monte Carlo. In 1995, the LS was $16,770 and the Z34 was $18,970. All 1995 to 2007 Monte Carlo's were built in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. Unlike Monte Carlos of previous years, the distinctive bulges to the front fenders and rear quarter panels were gone.

A special run of 400 1995 Z34's were made called the Monte Carlo Brickyard 400 Pace Car. The $2195 option included Interior Ornamentation, Embroidered Leather 45/55 Seating with Full Floor Console, an Aero Wing Spoiler, and an Accent Stripe Package.

For its four year run, the Monte Carlo was available in two trims, the LS and the Z34. LS models were powered by the 3.1 L 3100 V6 putting out 160 hp (119 kW) @ 5000 rpm (119 kW) and 185 ft·lbf (251 N·m) while Z34's featured a more powerful 3.4 L DOHC V6 engine with 215 hp (160 kW) and 220 ft·lbf (298 N·m). Aside from minor equipment changes, the fifth generation remained virtually unchanged during its life (the 3.4 L was replaced with the 3800 Series II, a much simpler design).

Though derided by some for its indistinct lines (called the 'Lumina Carlo') and its front-wheel drive drivetrain, the fifth generation sold well enough for Chevrolet to continue the line with a more original redesign in 2000. The 1995 bodystyle was also a favorite on the NASCAR circuit and enjoyed considerable success at the track.

This generation of the Monte Carlo was the last one to feature 6-passenger seating (bench in the front). And was also the last car-based vehicle with 2 doors to have 6-passenger seating.

For 2000, Chevrolet not only again called upon GM Motorsports for design inspiration, but also to Monte Carlos of the past. Among the traits carried over from older Monte Carlos were the stylized wheel flares, vertically oriented taillamps, and a stylized rear bumper. Another classic trait for 2000 was the return of the "Knight" badging, as well as a full gage cluster, not seen on the Monte Carlo since 1988. From the NASCAR circuit came the aerodynamic styling and duck tail spoiler as well as myriad commemorative and special edition packages. These packages would include several pace car editions, and special Dale Earnhardt, Sr. ("Intimidator SS"), Jeff Gordon, Dale Earnhardt, Jr., and Tony Stewart editions.

Trim levels consisted of the LS, LT, and SS, the latter being the first front-wheel drive SS in the Chevrolet lineup. The former used a 3.4 L OHV V6, while the latter got the 3.8 L V6. A Supercharged SS model was added for 2004 and 2005, though the naturally-aspirated SS continued as well, but was relabled as LT.

The 2006 Monte Carlo (and the companion Impala sedan) was introduced at the 2005 Los Angeles Auto Show. The base engine was a 3.5 L V6 producing 210 hp (156 kW). The most notable news, though, was the SS model's use of the Generation IV small-block V8 - the first V8 since the 1988 model. The 5.3 L V8 produced 303 hp (226 kW), which raised some eyebrows considering it was being placed in a front wheel drive car. The interior for 2006 was mildly redesigned.

The final Monte Carlo off the production line will be retained by GM for their Heritage Center collection. The second-to-last Monte off the line, the last "saleable" unit, was auctioned off on August 15, at Manheim's Statesville Auto Auction in Statesville, North Carolina. The winning bid went to Fred Simon, owner of Simon Chevrolet in Woonsocket, RI where it is on display on the dealership floor for the public to enjoy. This unit was at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway over the weekend of July 27-29 for the 2007 Allstate 400 at the Brickyard. While there, it was signed by all the current Team Chevrolet drivers who were active in the NASCAR Nextel Cup Series.

For 2007 the LTZ model was dropped along with the 3.9L engine being dropped in favor of utilizing the Flex Fuel 3.5L as the exclusive engine for non-SS models.

Based upon the above statements of idling of the Monte Carlo at Oshawa, and no announced plans to continue production elsewhere, it appears the Monte Carlo will go on hiatus after the 2007 model year. This is also backed up by NASCAR's transition away from the Monte Carlo into the Impala. While, in early March 2007, GM Vice President Bob Lutz stated the Monte Carlo would return using the new rear wheel drive Zeta architecture, he later flip-flopped his optimism on the future of that platform, beyond the Camaro and G8. Future revival of a Monte Carlo may depend heavily on sales of the fifth-generation Chevrolet Camaro, the proposed changes to CAFE Standards, and GM's economic situation in the financial crisis.

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Chevrolet Malibu

Seventh generation Chevrolet Malibu LT

The Chevrolet Malibu (named after Malibu, California) is a mid-size car produced in the United States by General Motors. It is marketed in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Middle East.

The first Malibu was a top-line subseries of the mid-sized Chevrolet Chevelle from 1964 to 1972. Malibus were generally available in a full-range of bodystyles including a four-door sedan, two-door Sport Coupe hardtop, convertible and two-seat station wagon. Interiors were more lavish than lesser Chevelle 300 and 300 Deluxe models thanks to patterned cloth and vinyl upholstery (all-vinyl in convertibles and station wagons), deep-twist carpeting, deluxe steering wheel and other items. The Malibu SS was available only as a two-door Sport Coupe hardtop or convertible and added bucket seats, center console (with optional four-speed manual or Powerglide transmissions), engine gauges and special wheelcovers, and offered with any six-cylinder or V8 engine offered in other Chevelles - with the top option being a 300 horsepower (220 kW) 327 in 1964.

For 1965, Malibus and other Chevelles received new grilles and revised tail sections but carried over the same basic styling and bodystyles from 1964. The Malibu and Malibu SS models continued as before with the SS featuring a blacked-out grille and special wheelcovers. Top engine option was now a 350-horsepower 327.

The Malibu SS was replaced in 1966 by a new Chevelle SS-396 series that included a big-block 396 cubic-inch V8 engine, heavy duty suspension and other performance equipment. Other SS-396 equipment was similar to Malibu Sport Coupes and convertibles including an all-vinyl bench seat. Bucket seats and console with floor shift were now optional on the SS and for 1966 with the SS now denoting a car with a big-block engine, the bucket seats became a new option on the regular Malibu Sport Coupe and convertible, upon which any six-cylinder or small-block V8 could be ordered. Also new for 1966 was the Chevelle Malibu four-door Sport Sedan hardtop. Styling revisions on all 1966 Chevelles including more rounded styling similar to the full-sized Chevys with sail panels and tunneled rear windows featured on two-door hardtop coupes.

For 1967, the same assortment of bodystyles were continued with styling changes similar to all other Chevelles including a new grille and revised tail section with tailights that wrapped around to the side. New this year was a Chevelle Malibu Concours station wagon with simulated wood trim on the exterior. Front disc brakes were a new option along with a stereo 8-track tape player. Same assortment of drivetrains carried over from 1966 with the top 327 cubic-inch V8 dropped from 350 to 325 horsepower (242 kW).

Malibus and all other Chevelles were completely restyled for 1968 with semi-fastback rooflines on two-door hardtops and wheelbases split to 112 inches (2,800 mm) on two-door models and 116 for four-door sedans and station wagons. Engine offerings included a new 307 cubic-inch V8 rated at 200 horsepower (150 kW) that replaced the 283 cubic-inch V8 that had served as the base V8 since the Chevelle's introduction in 1964. Inside was a new instrument panel featuring round gauges in square pods similar to what would appear in Camaros the following year. New for 1968 was the Concorus luxury option for Malibu sedans and coupes that included upgraded cloth or vinyl bench seats, carpeted lower door panels, woodgrain trim on dash and door panels, and Concours nameplates. There was again a top-line Concours Estate wagon with simulated woodgrain trim that had the same interior and exterior appointments as the Malibu sedans.

New grilles and rear decks with revised tailights highlighted the 1969 Malibus and other Chevelles. Instrument panels were revised and front seat headrests were now standard equipment due to federal safety mandate. The ignition switch moved from the instrument panel to the steering column and also doubled as a steering wheel lock. The 307 continued as the base V8 but the 327 engines were replaced by new 350 cubic-inch V8s of 255 and 300 horsepower (220 kW). GM's three-speed Turbo Hydra-Matic transmission, previously only offered on SS-396 Chevelles, was now available on all models with all engines including the six-cylinder and small-block V8s which in previous years were only available with the two-speed Powerglide.

For 1970, the Malibu was initially the only series of Chevelles offered, aside from the SS-396 and new SS-454, as the low-line 300 and 300 Deluxe models were discontinued, which also eliminated the two-door pillared coupes from the Chevelle lineup - which were never included in the Malibu series. New grilles, rear decks with tailights moved into the bumper and revised Sport Coupe roofline highlighted this year's changes. The standard six-cylinder engine was punched up from 230 to 250 cubic inches and 155 horsepower (116 kW), while the same assortment of V8s carried over with the addition of a 330-horsepower 400 cubic-inch V8 on non-SS Chevelles. At mid-year the Malibu was rejoined by lower-line Chevelle models that were simply called the base Chevelle in both four-door sedan and two-door hardtop.

In 1971, Malibus and all other Chevelles got a new grille surrounded by single headlamps replacing the duals of previous years and four round tailights similar to Camaros and Corvettes were located in the bumper. All engines were detuned to use lower-octane unleaded gasoline this year per GM corporate policy as a first step toward the catalytic converter equipped cars planned for 1975 and later models which would require no-lead fuel.

Only new grilles highlighted the 1972 Malibu and other Chevelles. All bodystyles were carried over from 1971 but 1972 would be the final year for hardtops and convertibles as the redesigned Chevelles originally planned for this year, but delayed until 1973, would feature Colonnade styling with side pillars and frameless door windows.

The Malibu was redesigned for the 1973 model year. Models included the base Chevelle Deluxe, mid-range Malibu and the top-line Laguna.

For 1974, the Deluxe was dropped, and the Malibu became the entry-level Chevelle. The Laguna trim package was replaced with the Malibu Classic. The Laguna S-3 model was introduced to replace the SS, and continued through 1976.

For the 1978 model year, the Malibu name which had been the bestselling badge in the lineup replaced the Chevelle name. This was Chevrolet's second downsized nameplate, following the lead of the 1977 Chevrolet Caprice. The new, more efficient platform was over a foot shorter and had shed 500 to 1,000 pounds compared previous versions, yet offered increased trunk space, leg room, and head room. Only two trim levels were offered - Malibu and Malibu Classic. The Malibu Classic Landau series had a two tone paint job on the upper and lower body sections, and a vinyl top.

Three bodystyles were produced (station wagon, sedan, and coupe). The sedan initially had a conservative six-window notchback roofline, in contrast to the unusual fastback rooflines adopted by Oldsmobile and Buick divisions. To reduce cost, the windows in the rear doors of 4-door sedans were fixed, while the wagons had small moveable vents. In 1981, sedans adopted a four-window profile and "formal" pillared upright roofline. The 2-door coupe was last produced in 1981. The 1982 Malibu was facelifted with more squared-off front styling marked by quad headlights with long, thin turn signals beneath them.

Among collectors, the last El Caminos have attracted interest, and the coupe has been sought after by drag racers and sometimes spotted as street machines, though not as prized as the first or second generation muscle cars.

The 4-door Malibu was also used in fleets, especially for law enforcement usage. After the Chevrolet Nova ceased production in 1979, the mid-size 9C1 police option (not to be confused with the full-size Chevrolet Impala 9C1 which was also available) was transferred to the Malibu, filling a void for mid-sized police vehicles. A 9C1-equipped Malibu with an LT-1 Z-28 Camaro engine driven by E. Pierce Marshall placed 13th of 47 in the 1979 Cannonball Baker Sea-To-Shining-Sea Memorial Trophy Dash, better known as the Cannonball Run.

There was no factory Malibu SS option available from . The SS only came in the El Camino. A very rare 1980 Malibu M80 was a dealer package for only North and South Carolina in an effort to revive the muscle car era. It was however mostly aimed at Nascar fans who regularly traveled to Darlington Raceway. To this day, it's unknown how many are left or were actually produced. (Estimates place this around 1,901 cars) All M80's had to be white with dark blue bucket seat and center console interior. The base of the M80 was a 2 door sport coupe equipped with the F41 Sport Suspension package and the normal V8 (140 hp) drive train. The M80 option added two dark blue skunk stripes up top and a lower door stripe with the M80 identification. The package also added front and rear spoilers and 1981 steel rally wheels.

In Mexico, General Motors produced this generation in the Ramos Arizpe plant, and was sold during three years (1979 to 81). Mexican versions came in three trim levels (Chevelle, Malibu and Malibu Classic) and two body styles (Sedan & Coupe) with the 250-cubic-inch (4.1 L) l-6 as basic engine and the 350-cubic-inch (5.7 L) 260 hp (194 kW) V-8 as the optional; this engine was standard on Malibu Classic models, during the three years of selling. This was possible because the Mexican regulations about emissions were more flexible than in the U.S.A.

Iraqi Taxi In 1981, General Motors of Canada in Oshawa produced a special order of 25,500 4-door Malibu sedans for Saddam Hussein's Iraqi government The deal was reportedly worth well over 100-million dollars to GMCL. These special order Malibus carried the unusual combination of GM's lowest-power carburated V6, the 110 hp (82 kW) 229-cubic-inch (3.8 L) engine mated to 3-speed transmission with a unique on-the-floor stick shifter. All of the cars were equipped with an all-white exterior, air conditioning, heavy duty cooling systems, tough upholstery and 14-inch (360 mm) stamped steel wheels with "baby moon" hubcaps and trim rings. However only 13,000 units ever made it to Iraq, with the majority of the cars becoming taxis in Baghdad (once the cab-identifying orange paint was added to the front & rear fenders).However in 1982 with the balance of ~12,500 additional Malibus either sitting on a dock in Halifax or awaiting port shipment in Oshawa, where they were built, the Iraqis suddenly cancelled the order. Excuses reportedly included various "quality concerns" including the inability of the local drivers to shift the finicky Saginaw manual transmission.This issue was eventually identified as being due to an apparent clutch release issue that eventually required on-site retrofitting by a crew of Canadian technicians sent to Iraq to support the infamous "Recall in the Desert".Later speculation was that the Iraqis were actually forced to back out for financial reasons, due to their escalating hostilities with Iran requiring the immediate diversion of funds to support the ramping Iraqi war effort.Then GM of Canada President Donald Hackworth was initially quoted as stating GMCL intended still try to sell the Malibus overseas in other Middle East markets- however in the end, the orphaned "Iraqi Taxi" Malibus were all sold to the Canadian public at the greatly reduced price of approx. $6,800 CAD and over the years have acquired a low-key 'celebrity' status.

The base 231-cubic-inch (3.8 L) V-6 engine for the 1978 Chevrolet Malibu developed just 95 horsepower (71 kW) with optional upgrade to a 105 horsepower (78 kW) V-6, or 145 horsepower (108 kW) V-8. The largest 170 horsepower (130 kW) 350-cubic-inch (5.7 L) V-8 was only offered in the wagon.

The Malibu shared GM's redesignated rear-wheel drive G platform with cars like the Pontiac Grand Prix, Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme and Buick Regal. 1982 was the final year that a Malibu Classic was marketed; Malibus were produced as 4-door sedans (and station wagons, which retained the full options list as the new FWD A-body wagons that would not appear until 1984) until 1983 when it was replaced by the front-wheel drive Chevrolet Celebrity. Although the sedan and wagon were phased out, the El Camino remained in production until 1987.

GM commissioned a 1/25 scale plastic promo of the El Camino from MPC, which was updated annually from 1978 to at least 1982, Kit versions of it were also made, and the tooling was later modified to an El Camino SS. Monogram also produced a '78 El Camino in their then-usual, slightly larger 1/24 scale, as well as a '79 police package sedan as a simplified 1/32 scale snap-together kit. Both have been reissued multiple times.

While the 2nd generation body was widely replicated in many scales as die cast models and toys, this downsized generation was rarely represented, with Maisto producing an El Camino with quad headlights.

A new front-wheel drive Malibu was introduced in 1997 on an extended wheelbase version of the GM N platform shared with the Buick Skylark, Oldsmobile Achieva, Oldsmobile Alero and Pontiac Grand Am. All N-body Malibus were produced at the Oklahoma City Assembly plant (after 2001 it was retooled to build the GMT360 SUVs) and the Wilmington Assembly plant (after 1999), before moving production to Lansing, Michigan. The Wilmington plant was retooled to build the Saturn L-Series in 1999. The Oldsmobile Cutlass was a clone of the Malibu that replaced the Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera. The Malibu itself replaced the compact Chevrolet Corsica. Power came from a 2.4 L 150 hp (112 kW) I4 or 3.1 L 155 hp (116 kW) V6. The Malibu was Motor Trend magazine's Car of the Year for 1997; this was later criticized by Car and Driver in 2009, citing that the Malibu was insufficiently distinguishable in terms of performance or interior quality to warrant such praise in hindsight.

1997 to 1999 Malibus had a front grille with the Malibu logo in silver in the center; 2000 to 2003 models, and the Classic, had the blue Chevrolet emblem on the front grille. 1997 to 1999 LS models were sometimes equipped with special gold-colored badges (the rear Malibu lettering and logo).

When a new Malibu was introduced on the Epsilon platform for 2004, the N-body Malibu was renamed Chevrolet Classic and remained in production for the 2004 and 2005 model years, being restricted to rental car companies and fleet orders.

The 3.1 L V6 was updated in 2000 with a new power rating of 170 hp (127 kW), and the 4-cylinder was dropped. A 4-cylinder was reintroduced in 2004 when the Ecotec was offered on the Classic. EPA fuel mileage estimates for the 2.2L Ecotec engine are 24-34 mpg.

The February 2002 issue of HCI: Hot Compact & Imports magazine featured the Chevrolet Malibu Cruiser concept that GM Performance Division built for the SEMA show in 2001. The car was painted Sublime Lime (BASF) and featured a highly-modified turbocharged 3500 SFI 60-degree V-6 (230 hp at 5,000 rpm and 280 ft·lbf (380 N·m) of torque at 2,900 rpm), a 4T65-E four speed transmission with overdrive, a set of 19x8-inch wheels by Evo wrapped in TOYO Proxes T1-S high-performance tires. Numerous interior modifications include a full length custom center console, four black leather Sparco racing seats, a KENWOOD entertainment center (radio, CD, DVD, TV, 10-disc changer and numerous amps and speakers). Other exterior modifications include custom HID headlamps (both low and hi beams) and custom "Altezza" style taillights, and a custom bodykit. Chevrolet never intended to build the Cruiser as a model you could buy from your local dealer (minus bodykit, lights, wheels and interior), but to show the younger people that purchased the car, or were looking to purchase the car, that one could modify the car to any flavour they wanted.

The Malibu name was moved to the new Epsilon platform based on the 2002 Opel Vectra C for 2004. The Epsilon-based Malibu comes in two bodystyles, a standard 4-door sedan and a 5-door Malibu Maxx hatchback. It was the first mid-size Chevrolet hatchback since the 1980s.

This generation of the Malibu initially debuted with a front fascia design featuring a wide grille split horizontally by a prominent chrome bar that ran the entire width of the car, which was intended to make it resemble Chevrolet's trucks. However, for 2006, the front end was updated with more conventional styling: the chrome bar was removed, and the grille itself was made smaller, bearing a resemblance to the grille on the previous Malibu.

Base power comes from a 2.2 L Ecotec L61 I4 which produces 145 hp (108 kW). LS and LT trims originally had a 3.5 L 200 hp (149 kW) High Value LX9 V6 while both sedan and Maxx SS models are powered by the 3.9 L 240 hp (179 kW) High Value LZ9 V6. For 2007, the LX9 was replaced with the LZ4 V6, which in the Malibu produces 217 hp (162 kW). A remote starter is also available, which was introduced on several other GM vehicles for 2004.

The Malibu Maxx was discontinued for 2008. However, the Malibu sedans remained in production for fleet orders for the 2008 model year. GM refers to these models as the Malibu Classic. The cars themselves bear Malibu badges, unlike the past generation Classic.

A special SS trim was available on the Malibu and Malibu Maxx with the 3.9 L LZ9 V6.

The Malibu was redesigned for the 2008 model year . It is built on a revised version of the long-wheelbase Epsilon platform shared with the Saturn Aura, the Opel Signum and Pontiac G6. It is assembled in Kansas City, alongside the Saturn Aura, and also at Lake Orion, Michigan, alongside the Pontiac G6. Overall it is 3 inches (76 mm) longer with a wheelbase that is six inches (152 mm) longer. Interior room remains mid-size like the previous Malibus, and has been decreased from 101 cubic feet (2.9 m3) to 95 cubic feet (2.7 m3) despite having a longer wheelbase, although front legroom has increased from 41.9 in (1,064 mm) to 42.4 in (1,077 mm). Rear legroom has decreased from 38.5 in (978 mm) to 37.6 in (955 mm). The interior design has also been completely reworked, with a selection of two-tone color combinations(brick and tan two tone), telescoping steering wheel, higher-quality materials and a twin-cowl dash design. Drag (Cd) is at 0.33.

The 2008 Malibu offers a 169 hp (126 kW), 2.4 L inline-4 as the base engine, and a 252 hp (188 kW), 3.6 L V6 as an option. These engines have aluminum blocks and heads, dual overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, twin balance shafts, and variable valve timing. Like the 2007 model, the 2008 Malibu is available in LS, LT(1LT and 2LT)and LTZ trim levels, however the 4-cylinder engine will now be available on the LTZ, and on that trim level it is paired with a six-speed automatic transmission. The V6 models all come with a six-speed automatic, the 4-cylinder LS and LT models use a four-speed automatic as standard equipment. Special order fleet vehicles have the option of replacing the 4-cylinder engine with a pushrod high value V6 engine for the 2008 base model sedan (not LTZ). For 2009 models the six-speed transmission was made available on the 1LT and standard on the 2LT. manual transmission is not offered.. A BAS mild hybrid, with the base inline-4 like the Saturn Aura Green Line, is available offering an increased fuel economy of 24 mpg-US (9.8 L/100 km; 29 mpg-imp)/32 mpg-US (7.4 L/100 km; 38 mpg-imp), which for the 2009 model, is now 26 mpg-US (9.0 L/100 km; 31 mpg-imp)/34 mpg-US (6.9 L/100 km; 41 mpg-imp). All models are front-wheel drive sedans, as Chevrolet dropped the Malibu MAXX hatchback model.

OnStar is now standard on all Malibu models. Six air bags are also now standard: two dual-stage front bags, two side-impact curtain air bags protecting the heads of both front and rear passengers, and two side-impact thorax bags mounted in the front seats. Traction control, electronic tire pressure monitoring system, four wheel disc brakes, antilock brakes, and daytime running lamps are now all standard included safety features on all Malibus. GM's StabiliTrak brand electronic stability control is standard on all models except the very base LS model.

In January 2008, the new Malibu received the North American Car of the Year Award at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit in voting among a panel comprised of fifty automotive journalists in a field of entries including the 2008 Cadillac CTS and the 2008 Honda Accord. The Malibu's win marks the second straight year that a car built on GM's Epsilon platform has won the North American COTY Award with the 2007 North American COTY Award having gone to the 2007 Saturn Aura.

The new 2008 Consumer Reports reliability survey's ratings of the Malibu are "average" for the LTZ V6 and "above average" for the LS 4-cylinder.

Initial sales have exceeded production.

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Source : Wikipedia