Lansing

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Posted by motoman 03/06/2009 @ 14:08

Tags : lansing, cities and towns, michigan, states, us

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Failed ramp deal to be costly for Lansing - Lansing State Journal
The city of Lansing's failed effort to sell its 316 N. Capitol Ave. parking ramp means more than a missed opportunity to partner with Lansing Community College. It also means the city is likely to lose more than $350000 in annual revenues once the...
Local Music Beat: Loune's indie stylings, Lansing welcomes DJs - Hub
After all, he plays bass in Loune, an East Lansing indie rock band that plays its first gig in months on Friday at Mac's Bar. "It's been a long time since I've played out, and it's really unexplainable how it feels," he said. "This music is something...
HS tennis: Lansing doubles team captures crown at IAC Championships - Ithaca Journal
CORTLAND - Lansing's Keenan Hughes and Jonathon Sun teamed up to win a title at second doubles at the Interscholastic Athletic Conference Championship Tournament on Tuesday at SUNY Cortland. Hughes and Sun beat Elmira Notre Dame's Porter Weeks and Ben...
ADF Fuckers Suing Bash Back! Lansing, Bash Back! News, Jesse Does - Infoshop News
Lansing and individuals because the authorities would not file a single criminal complaint regarding an action at the Mount Hope Church in Lansing last fall. But that's not all! Those pesky evange-fascists are trying to identify and out up to 20 other...
Would a DPS takeover pass or fail? - Detroit Free Press
Experts and observers predict that if mayoral control is proposed again -- either as a bill in Lansing or on a ballot in Detroit -- it is more likely to pass than fail. Residents are frustrated over crises from the past three years under the elected...
Lansing Police Patrol Cars Go High-Tech - WILX-TV
"We're always looking for ways to free up patrol time for our officers, we decided that we were going to take an aggressive approach and get the equipment out there to our officers so they can be more effective and efficient," said Lansing Police Chief...
Three set to challenge Bernero in Lansing mayoral race - Lansing State Journal
City Councilwoman Carol Wood, Lansing Board of Education member Charles Ford, and relative unknown Benjamin Hassenger filed the proper paperwork by the 4 pm Tuesday deadline. "Let the games begin," Bernero said. "I'm sure they will....
Lansing mayor tells Saginaw crowd: 'Bailouts for banks, baloney ... - The Saginaw News - MLive.com
by Barrie Barber | The Saginaw News Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero posed a question to mostly United Auto Worker backers rallying to "Keep It Made In America" Tuesday at the Commerce Tower. "Are you tired of being screwed?" he asked about 60 people who...
Labor Secretary Visits Lansing - WILX-TV
Solis was in Lansing Monday, along with Governor Jennifer Granholm, to talk about federal funding for green jobs-- jobs she says are good fits for those who may be falling victim to the declining auto industry. "Workers here are in need of assistance,"...
Construction industry must upgrade 'green' skills - Michigan Business Review - MLive.com
Michigan sponsored a conference May 11 in Lansing as it prepares to launch the green jobs effort. • The initiative will train the workforce for the sustainable economy jobs of the future. • Its first training effort will be an "Academy for Green...

Lansing Car Assembly

Olds Motor Works, about 1910

Lansing Car Assembly was a General Motors automobile factory in Lansing, Michigan. It contained two elements, a 1901 automobile plant in downtown Lansing, and the 1920 Durant Motors factory on Lansing's Far Westside.

The Lansing plant was the longest-operating automobile factory in the United States when it closed on May 6, 2005, and one of General Motors last assembly plants where vehicle bodies were made at one plant, and then trucked to another plant to be finished. General Motors began demolition of the plant in the spring of 2006, and demolition was completed in 2007. A new plant at nearby Delta Township took its place when it began production in 2006.

Lansing Car Assembly (LCA) began in 1901 when Ransom E. Olds moved his Olds Motor Works to the city. He set up his plant on the site of the fairgrounds next to the Grand River. This plant in downtown Lansing would later be known as Lansing Car Assembly - Chassis Plant.

The plant along Verlinden Avenue, on Lansing's border with Lansing Township, opened in 1920 as a factor for Durant Motor Works. After the demise of Durant, it remained closed until GM purchased it in 1935. It restarted production for GM's Fisher Body division, later becoming the Buick-Oldsmobile-Cadillac factory. Its final name was Lansing Car Assembly - Body Plant.

The last cars that Lansing Car Assembly produced were the Chevrolet Malibu/Chevrolet Classic, Oldsmobile Alero, and Pontiac Grand Am, which was the final vehicle built there. The plant built the very last Oldsmobile.

LCA was regularly ranked among the most productive automobile assembly plants in North America. In 2002, it was ranked the number one most productive assembly plant in North America by The Harbour Report, the auto industry's leading measurement of plant efficiency.

The main plant was located in downtown Lansing, Michigan located along Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard/Logan Street at the Grand River. It sat on the original site of the Michigan State Fairgrounds. The plant also included the unique Lansing GM Building 150 which sat in between north and sounthbound Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard bridges.

It featured two separate assembly lines. Partially completed vehicles were transported by truck from the Body Plant to either the North Line "M" or the South Line "C" for completion. Upon completion, cars were driven off the assembly line and over northbound Martin Luther King, Jr. using a skybridge. After final inspection, the cars were placed in staging yards to either be shipped by truck or by rail.

The first factory on site opened in 1902 as part of Olds Motor Works, and became part of General Motors when they bought that company out in 1908. The complex was closed in 2005, finally being demolished in 2007. Harbour Consulting rated it as the sixth most efficient auto plant in North America in 2006.

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Lansing Lugnuts

LansingLugnuts PrimaryLogo.png

The Lansing Lugnuts are a Class A minor league baseball team, affiliated with the Toronto Blue Jays, that plays in the Midwest League.

The Midwest League came to Lansing, Michigan in 1996. The franchise began in Lafayette, Indiana, in 1955; after two seasons it moved to Waterloo, Iowa, where it stayed for 36 seasons. Before the 1994 season it moved to Springfield, Illinois, but only spent two seasons there before moving to Lansing. The franchise was an affiliate of the Kansas City Royals on two separate occasions in three different cities: as the Waterloo Royals from 1969 through 1976, as the Sultans of Springfield in 1995, and then, upon the team's move to Lansing, from 1996 through 1998. The Lugnuts were then an affiliate of the Chicago Cubs from 1999 through 2004 before joining the Jays' farm system for the 2005 season.

The team plays at Oldsmobile Park (named after the now-defunct General Motors division that was based there), which opened in 1996. Oldsmobile Park seats over 11,000 fans and is one of the largest Class A Minor League baseball parks in the United States. The franchise national attendance record of 538,326 was set during its inaugural year. They won the Midwest League Championship in 1997 and 2003.

The following are players currently in Major League Baseball who played, at one time, for the Lugnuts. This partial list includes players making injury-comeback starts as well as those that developed in Lansing.

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Lansing (town), New York

Map of New York highlighting Tompkins County.svg

Lansing is a town in Tompkins County, New York, United States. The population was 10,521 at the 2000 census. The town is named after John Lansing.

The Town of Lansing has within it a village named Lansing. The town is on the north border of the county, north of the City of Ithaca.

Lansing, located on the Eastern shore of Cayuga Lake in the Finger Lakes district of New York, was within the realm of the Cayuga tribe. The Mandalin Expedition of 1779 passed through the area to destroy native villages in retaliation for raids on colonists.

In 1760, the area was divided into lots (the Central New York Military Tract) to pay the Revolutionary war soldiers for their service. The first settlers came to Lansing in 1764. John Lemming, Secretary to General Schuyler, was charged with granting this land.

The Town of Lansing was formed in 1817 from the Town of Genoa (in Cayuga County) when Tompkins County was established.

From 1942 The 'Watchtower Bible College of Gilead' was a facility in South Lansing for training Christian Missionaries from Jehovah's Witnesses until the 1970's. Later that name was changed to the Watchtower Bible School of Gilead and moved to New York City.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 69.9 square miles (181.1 km²), of which, 60.7 square miles (157.3 km²) of it is land and 9.2 square miles (23.9 km²) of it (13.17%) is water.

The north town line is the border of Cayuga County, and the west town line is delineated by Cayuga Lake, one of the Finger Lakes. Salmon Creek flows into the lake near Myers.

As of the census of 2000, there were 10,521 people, 4,374 households, and 2,668 families residing in the town. The population density was 173.3 people per square mile (66.9/km²). There were 4,634 housing units at an average density of 76.3/sq mi (29.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 84.09% White, 4.09% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 8.86% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.73% from other races, and 2.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.35% of the population.

There were 4,374 households out of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.3% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.0% were non-families. 30.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the town the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 23.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 99.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $48,250, and the median income for a family was $59,758. Males had a median income of $38,146 versus $31,250 for females. The per capita income for the town was $25,634. About 4.2% of families and 6.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 3.1% of those age 65 or over.

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Lansing (village), New York

Lansing, New York is located in New York

Lansing is a village in Tompkins County, New York, United States. The population was 3,417 at the 2000 census.

The Village of Lansing is in the Town of Lansing and is north of Ithaca.

Tompkins County Airport (ITH), is partially in Eastern part of the village.

Lansing was formerly within the territory of the Cayuga tribe and later became part of the Central New York Military Tract.

The village was incorporated in 1974.

Lansing is located at 42°29′15″N 76°29′9″W / 42.4875°N 76.48583°W / 42.4875; -76.48583 (42.487688, -76.486075).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 4.6 square miles (12.0 km²), of which, 4.6 square miles (11.9 km²) of it is land and 0.22% is water.

The village is at the south end of Cayuga Lake. It borders the Towns of Dryden and Ithaca and also the Village of Cayuga Heights.

New York State Route 13 passes across the village, joining New York State Route 34, which passes down the west side of the village, south of the village line.

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,417 people, 1,620 households, and 808 families residing in the village. The population density was 740.7 people per square mile (286.2/km²). There were 1,705 housing units at an average density of 369.6/sq mi (142.8/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 68.01% White, 5.12% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 22.51% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.40% from other races, and 2.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.54% of the population.

There were 1,620 households out of which 23.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.4% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.1% were non-families. 38.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.06 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the village the population was spread out with 18.9% under the age of 18, 11.4% from 18 to 24, 41.1% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 101.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.0 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $38,185, and the median income for a family was $48,167. Males had a median income of $41,650 versus $31,181 for females. The per capita income for the village was $29,047. About 9.5% of families and 12.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.5% of those under age 18 and 1.6% of those age 65 or over.

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Source : Wikipedia