Lleyton Hewitt

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Posted by bender 02/27/2009 @ 23:04

Tags : lleyton hewitt, tennis players, tennis, sports

News headlines
Lleyton Hewitt sues former agents for $1.35m - Herald Sun
AUSSIE tennis star Lleyton Hewitt earned less than 1 per cent interest on his millions in US bank accounts, court documents claim. Hewitt, who has won more than $18 million and millions more in endorsements, is suing his former management agency...
Cilic, Hewitt fall in BMW quarters - MiamiHerald.com
1 star Lleyton Hewitt were among Friday's quarterfinal losers at the $595000 clay-court BMW Open. The world No. 15 Cilic succumbed to Frenchman Jeremy Chardy 3-6, 7-5, 6-4, while the unseeded two-time major champion Hewitt was shown the door by...
Hewitt, Safin to play in Queen's Club tournament - The Associated Press
LONDON (AP) — Four-time champion Lleyton Hewitt and former top-ranked Marat Safin will play in the Queen's Club tournament, a major warmup for Wimbledon. Organizers said Thursday that No. 8 Gilles Simon and No. 10 Gael Monfils have also confirmed their...
Heard the gossip? Lleyton won a title - Grenfell Record and Bland Advertiser
Lleyton Hewitt - "washed-up," "perennially injured", "gap-year No.1" Lleyton Hewitt - wins a tournament on clay, something that happens about as often as the average garbage collector dates Gisele Bundchen (actually, it was his first title on red dirt...
Tomas Berdych wins the BMW Open - United Press International
Before Sunday, he topped France's Jeremy Chardy 6-1, 5-7, 6-2; two-time major champion Lleyton Hewitt 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4) in a match that lasted nearly 2 1/2 hours and German crowd favorite Andreas Beck 1-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4). Berdych and Youzhny have met...
Hewitt not master of his own destiny - The Age
HAVING been spared the perceived dangers of a Davis Cup tie in Chennai during India's election period, Lleyton Hewitt now finds himself at the mercy of the parochial European tournament directors, who will effectively determine his French Open lead-up...
Hewitt, Berdych advance at Munich Open - Xinhua
BERLIN, May 8 (Xinhua) -- Australia's former world number one Lleyton Hewitt and fourth-seeded Tomas Berdych both made it through to the quarterfinals of the Munich Open on Thursday. Hewitt, who is coming back after hip injury, dropped the first three...
Another serve from Woman's Day for Bec and Lleyton Hewitt - Adelaidenow
Tennis's Lleyton Hewitt and wife Bec have been given another serve by Woman's Day . This time the magazine is claiming the couple have "hit rock bottom". In its latest edition the mag states "Lleyton's tennis career has all but been destroyed",...
Gonzo Pulls, Hewitt WC, Bryans No. 1 at ATP Munich - Tennis-X.com
1 Lleyton Hewitt is an unseeded wildcard, opening against German Phillipp Petzschner, and a meeting with the No. 5 Schuettler looming in the second round. Cilic also opens against a qualifier, while the No. 6 Kiefer will face a strong opening challenge...
Nalbo facing four months out - SkySports
The former world number three was a finalist at Wimbledon in 2002 - losing to Lleyton Hewitt - but has struggled for form in recent months. The 27-year-old's last match was a 6-2 6-2 loss to Chile's Paul Capdeville at last week's Estoril Open in...

Tennis

Lawn tennis in the U.S., 1887

Tennis is a sport played between two players (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a strung racquet to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt (most of the time Optic Yellow, but can be any color or even two-tone) over a net into the opponent's court.

The modern game of tennis originated in the United Kingdom in the late 19th century as "lawn tennis" and had heavy connections to the ancient game of real tennis. After its creation, tennis spread throughout the upper-class English-speaking population before spreading around the world. Tennis is an Olympic sport and is played at all levels of society at all ages. The sport can be played by anyone who can hold a racket, including people in wheelchairs. In the United States, there is a collegiate circuit organized by the National Collegiate Athletics Association.

Except for the adoption of the tiebreaker in the 1970s, the rules of tennis have changed very little since the 1890s. A recent addition to professional tennis has been the adoption of "instant replay" technology coupled with a point challenge system, which allows a player to challenge the official call of a point.

Along with its millions of players, millions of people worldwide follow tennis as a spectator sport, especially the four Grand Slam tournaments (sometimes referred to as the "majors"): the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open.

Tennis as the modern sport can be dated to two separate roots. Between 1859 and 1865, Major Harry Gem and his friend Augurio Perera developed a game that combined elements of rackets similar to the game of Poona or Badminton many British soldiers brought from being stationed in India and the Basque ball game pelota, which they played on Perera's croquet lawn in Birmingham, United Kingdom. In 1872, along with two local doctors, they founded the world's first tennis club in Leamington Spa. The Courier of July 23, 1884 recorded one of the first tennis tournaments, held in the grounds of Shrubland Hall.

In December 1873, Major Walter Clopton Wingfield designed a similar game — which he called sphairistike (Greek: σφάίρίστική, meaning "skill at playing at ball"), and was soon known simply as "sticky" — for the amusement of his guests at a garden party on his estate of Nantclwyd, in Llanelidan, Wales. He based the game on the newer sport of outdoor tennis or real tennis. According to most tennis historians, modern tennis terminology also derives from this period, as Wingfield borrowed both the name and much of the French vocabulary of real tennis and applied them to his new game.

The first championships at Wimbledon in London were played in 1877. On May 21, 1881, the United States National Lawn Tennis Association (now the United States Tennis Association) was formed to standardize the rules and organize competitions. The U.S. National Men's Singles Championship, now the US Open, was first held in 1881 at Newport, Rhode Island. The U.S. National Women's Singles Championships were first held in 1887. Tennis was also popular in France, where the French Open dates to 1891. Thus, Wimbledon, the US Open, the French Open, and the Australian Open (dating to 1905) became and have remained the most prestigious events in tennis. Together these four events are called the Grand Slam (a term borrowed from bridge).

The comprehensive International Lawn Tennis Federation, now known as the International Tennis Federation, rules promulgated in 1924 have remained remarkably stable in the ensuing eighty years, the one major change being the addition of the tiebreaker system designed by James Van Alen.

The Davis Cup, an annual competition between national teams, dates to 1900.

In 1926, promoter C.C. Pyle established the first professional tennis tour with a group of American and French tennis players playing exhibition matches to paying audiences. The most notable of these early professionals were the American Vinnie Richards and the Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen. Once a player turned pro he or she could not compete in the major (amateur) tournaments.

In 1968, commercial pressures and rumors of some amateurs taking money under the table led to the abandonment of this distinction, inaugurating the open era, in which all players could compete in all tournaments, and top players were able to make their living from tennis. With the beginning of the open era, the establishment of an international professional tennis circuit, and revenues from the sale of television rights, tennis's popularity has spread worldwide, and the sport has shed its upper/middle-class English-speaking image (although it is acknowledged that this stereotype still exists).

In 1954, Van Alen founded the International Tennis Hall of Fame, a non-profit museum in Newport, Rhode Island. The building contains a large collection of tennis memorabilia as well as a hall of fame honoring prominent members and tennis players from all over the world. Each year, a grass-court tournament and an induction ceremony honoring new Hall of Fame members are hosted on its grounds.

Tennis is played on a rectangular, flat surface, usually grass, clay, or a hardcourt of concrete and/or asphalt. The court is 78 feet (23.77 m) long, and its width is 27 feet (8.23 m) for singles matches and 36 ft (10.97 m) for doubles matches. Additional clear space around the court is required in order for players to reach overrun balls. A net is stretched across the full width of the court, parallel with the baselines, dividing it into two equal ends. The net is 3 feet 6 inches (1.07 m) high at the posts and 3 feet (91.4 cm) high in the center.

The design of the lawn tennis court has undergone much development. It was Major Walter Clopton Wingfield who, in 1873, designed a court approximate to the current one for his stické tennis (sphairistike). This template was modified in 1875 to the court shape that exists today; the markings homogeneous with Wingfield's design, with the hourglass shape of his court changed to a more linear framework.

The lines that delineate the width of the court are called the baseline (farthest back) and the service line (middle of the court). The short mark in the center of each baseline is referred to as either the hash mark or the center mark. The outermost lines that make up the length are called the doubles sidelines. These are the boundaries used when doubles is being played. The lines to the inside of the doubles sidelines are the singles sidelines and are used as boundaries in singles play. The area between a doubles sideline and the nearest singles sideline is called the doubles alley, which is considered playable in doubles play. The line that runs across the center of a player's side of the court is called the service line because the serve must be delivered into the area between the service line and the net on the receiving side. Despite its name, this is not where a player legally stands when making a serve. The line dividing the service line in two is called the center line or center service line. The boxes this center line creates are called the service boxes; depending on a player's position, he will have to hit the ball into one of these when serving. A ball is out only if none of it has hit the line upon its first bounce. All the lines are required to be between 1 and 2 inches (51 mm) in width. The baseline can be up to 4 inches (100 mm) wide if so desired.

The players (or teams) start on opposite sides of the net. One player is designated the server, and the opposing player, or in doubles one of the opposing players, is the receiver. Service alternates between the two halves of the court. For each point, the server starts behind his baseline, between the center mark and the sideline. The receiver may start anywhere on their side of the net. When the receiver is ready, the server will serve, although the receiver must play to the pace of the server.

In a legal service, the ball travels over the net (without touching it) and into the diagonally opposite service box. If the ball hits the net but lands in the service box, this is a let or net service, which is void, and the server gets to retake that serve. The player can serve any number of let services in a point and they are always treated as voids and not as faults. A fault is a serve that is long, wide, or not over the net. There is also a "foot fault", which occurs when a player's foot touches the baseline or an extension of the center mark before the ball is hit. If the second service is also faulty, this is a double fault, and the receiver wins the point. However, if the serve is in, it is considered a legal service.

A legal service starts a rally, in which the players alternate hitting the ball across the net. A legal return consists of the player or team hitting the ball exactly once before it has bounced twice or hit any fixtures except the net, provided that it still falls in the server's court. The ball then travels back over the net and bounces in the court on the opposite side. The first player or team to fail to make a legal return loses the point.

A tennis match is composed of a number of sets. Typically for both men's and women's matches, the first player to win two sets wins the match. At certain important tennis tournaments for men, including all four Grand Slam tournaments and the final of the Olympic Games, the first man to win three sets wins the match. A set consists of games, and games, in turn, consist of points.

A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving. A game is won by the first player to have won at least four points in total and at least two points more than the opponent. The running score of each game is described in a manner particular to tennis: scores of zero to three points are described as "love" (or zero), "fifteen", "thirty", and "forty" respectively. (See the main article Tennis score for the origin of these words as used in tennis.) If at least three points have been scored by each player, and the scores are equal, the score is "deuce". If at least three points have been scored by each side and a player has one more point than his opponent, the score of the game is "advantage" for the player in the lead. During informal games, "advantage" can also be called "ad in" or "ad out", depending on whether the serving player or receiving player is ahead, respectively.

In tournament play, the chair umpire calls the point count (e.g., "fifteen-love") after each point. The score of a tennis match during play is always read with the serving player's score first. After a match, the score is always read with the winning player's score first. At the end of a game, the chair umpire also announces the winner of the game and the overall score.

A game point occurs in tennis whenever the player who is in the lead in the game needs only one more point to win the game. The terminology is extended to sets (set point), matches (match point), and even championships (championship point). For example, if the player who is serving has a score of 40-love, the player has a triple game point (triple set point, etc.) as the player has three consecutive chances to win the game. Game points, set points, and match points are not part of official scoring and are not announced by the chair umpire in tournament play.

A break point occurs if the receiver, not the server, has a game point. Break points are of particular importance in men's professional tennis because serving is generally advantageous. The advantage to the server is much less in the women's game. A receiver who has two (score of 15-40) or three (score of love-40) consecutive chances to win the game has double break point or triple break point, respectively. As with game, set, and match points, break points are not announced.

A set consists of a sequence of games played with service alternating between games, ending when the count of games won meets certain criteria. Typically, a player wins a set by winning at least six games and at least two games more than the opponent. If one player has won six games and the opponent five, an additional game is played. If the leading player wins that game, the player wins the set 7–5. If the trailing player wins the game, a tiebreaker is played. A tiebreaker, played under a separate set of rules, allows one player to win one more game and thus the set, to give a final set score of 7–6. Only in the final sets of matches at the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, the Olympic Games, Davis Cup, and Fed Cup are tiebreakers not played. In these cases, sets are played indefinitely until one player has a two game lead. A "love" set means that the loser of the set won zero games. In tournament play, the chair umpire announces the winner of the set and the overall score.

In tournament play, the chair umpire announces the end of the match with the well-known phrase "Game, set, match" followed by the winning person's or team's name.

Another, however informal, tennis format is called "Kiwi doubles", "Canadian doubles" or "cut-throat". This involves three players, with one person playing a doubles team. The single player gets to utilize the alleys normally reserved only for a doubles team. Conversely, the doubles team does not use the alleys when executing a shot. The scoring is the same as a regular game. This format is not sanctioned by any official body.

Wheelchair tennis can be played by able-bodied players as well as people who require a wheelchair for mobility. An extra bounce is permitted. This rule makes it possible to have mixed wheelchair and able-bodied matches. It is possible for a doubles team to consist of a wheelchair player and an able-bodied player (referred to as "one-up, one-down"), or for a wheelchair player to play against an able-bodied player. In such cases, the extra bounce is permitted for the wheelchair users only.

In most professional play and some amateur competition, there is an officiating head judge or chair umpire (usually referred to as the umpire), who sits in a raised chair to one side of the court. The umpire has absolute authority to make factual determinations. The umpire may be assisted by line judges, who determine whether the ball has landed within the required part of the court and who also call foot faults. There also may be a net judge who determines whether the ball has touched the net during service. In some tournaments, certain line judges, usually those who would be calling the serve, are replaced by electronic sensors that beep when an out call would have been made. In some open-tournament matches, players are allowed to challenge a limited number of close calls by means of instant replay. The US Open, the Miami Masters in Miami, the US Open Series, and World Team Tennis started using a "challenge" system in 2006 and the Australian Open and Wimbledon introduced the system in 2007. This used the Hawk-Eye system and the rules were similar to those used in the NFL, where a player gets a limited number of instant-replay challenges per match/set. In clay-court matches, such as at the French Open, a call may be questioned by reference to the mark left by the ball's impact on the court surface.

The referee, who is usually located off the court, is the final authority about tennis rules. When called to the court by a player or team captain, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision if the tennis rules were violated (question of law) but may not change the umpire's decision on a question of fact. If, however, the referee is on the court during play, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision.

Ball kids may be employed to retrieve balls, pass them to the players, and hand players their towels. They have no adjudicative role. In rare events (e.g., if they are hurt or if they have caused a hindrance), the umpire may ask them for a statement of what actually happened. The umpire may consider their statements when making a decision. In some leagues, especially junior leagues, players make their own calls, trusting each other to be honest. This is the case for many school and university level matches. The referee or referee's assistant, however, can be called on court at a player's request, and the referee or assistant may change a player's call. In unofficiated matches, a ball is out only if the player entitled to make the call is sure that the ball is out.

In tennis, a junior is a player under the age of 18 who is still legally protected by a parent or guardian. Players on the main adult tour who are under 18 must have documents signed by a parent or guardian. These players, however, are still eligible to play in junior tournaments.

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) conducts a junior tour that allows juniors to establish a world ranking and an Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) or Women's Tennis Association (WTA) ranking. Most juniors who enter the international circuit do so by progressing through ITF, Satellite, Future, and Challenger tournaments before entering the main circuit. The latter three circuits also have adults competing in them. Some juniors, however, such as Australian Lleyton Hewitt and Frenchman Gaël Monfils, have catapulted directly from the junior tour to the ATP tour by dominating the junior scene or by taking advantage of opportunities given to them to participate in professional tournaments.

In 2004, the ITF implemented a new rankings scheme to encourage greater participation in doubles, by combining two rankings (singles and doubles) into one combined tally. Junior tournaments do not offer prize money except for the Grand Slams, which are the most prestigious junior events. Juniors may earn income from tennis by participating in the Future, Satellite, or Challenger tours. Tournaments are broken up into different tiers offering different amounts of ranking points, culminating with Grade A.

Leading juniors are allowed to participate for their nation in the Junior Fed Cup and Davis Cup competitions as well. To succeed in tennis often means having to begin playing at a young age. To facilitate and nurture a junior's growth in tennis, almost all tennis playing nations have developed a junior development system. Juniors develop their play through a range of tournaments on all surfaces, accommodating all different standards of play. Talented juniors may also receive sponsorships from governing bodies or private institutions.

A tennis match is intended to be continuous. Because stamina is a relevant factor, arbitrary delays are not permitted. In most cases, service is required to occur no more than 20 seconds after the end of the previous point. This is increased to 90 seconds when the players change ends (after every odd-numbered games), and a 120 second break is permitted between sets. Other than this, breaks are permitted only when forced by events beyond the players' control, such as rain, damaged footwear, damaged racquet, or the need to retrieve an errant ball. Should a player be determined to be stalling repeatedly, the chair umpire may initially give a warning followed by subsequent penalties of "point", "game", and default of the match for the player who is consistently taking longer than the allowed time limit.

In the event of a rain delay or other such proponent, the match is resumed at a later time, with the same score as at the time of the delay.

Balls wear out quickly in serious play and, therefore, in ATP and WTA tournaments, they are changed after every nine games with the first change occurring after only seven games, because the first set of balls is also used for the pre-match warm-up. However, in ITF tournaments like Fed Cup, the balls are changed in a 9-11 style. Continuity of the balls' condition is considered part of the game, so if a re-warm-up is required after an extended break in play (usually due to rain), then the re-warm-up is done using a separate set of balls, and use of the match balls is resumed only when play resumes.

It has recently been proposed to allow coaching on court during a match on a limited basis.

A competent tennis player has eight basic shots in his or her repertoire: the serve, forehand, backhand, volley, half-volley, overhead smash, drop shot, and lob.

A serve (or, more formally, a "service") in tennis is a shot to start a point. The serve is initiated by tossing the ball into the air and hitting it (usually near the apex of its trajectory) into the diagonally opposite service box without touching the net. The serve may be hit under- or overhand.

Experienced players strive to master the conventional overhand serve to maximize its power and placement. The server may employ different types of serve including flat serve, topspin serve, slice serve, and kick (American twist) serve. A reverse type of spin serve is hit in a manner that spins the ball opposite the natural spin of the server, the spin direction depending upon right- or left-handedness. If the ball is spinning counterclockwise, it will curve right from the hitter's point of view and curve left if spinning clockwise.

Some servers are content to use the serve simply to initiate the point; however, advanced players often try to hit a winning shot with their serve. A winning serve that is not touched by the opponent is called an "ace". If the receiver manages to touch it but fails to successfully return it, it is called a "service winner".

Players use various grips during play, including the continental, eastern, and western grips. Different grips generally are used for different types of spin and shots.

For a right-handed player, the forehand is a stroke that begins on the right side of the body, continues across the body as contact is made with the ball, and ends on the left side of the body. There are various grips for executing the forehand, and their popularity has fluctuated over the years. The most important ones are the continental, the eastern, the semi-western, and the western. For a number of years, the small, apparently frail 1920s player Bill Johnston was considered by many to have had the best forehand of all time, a stroke that he hit shoulder-high using a western grip. Few top players used the western grip after the 1920s, but in the latter part of the 20th century, as shot-making techniques and equipment changed radically, the western forehand made a strong comeback and is now used by many modern players. No matter which grip is used, most forehands are generally executed with one hand holding the racquet, but there have been fine players with two-handed forehands. In the 1940s and 50s, the Ecuadorian/American player Pancho Segura used a two-handed forehand to devastating effect against larger, more powerful players. Currently, France's Fabrice Santoro uses a two-handed forehand. Some females such as Monica Seles and France's Marion Bartoli also use a two-handed forehand.

For right-handed players, the backhand is a stroke that begins on the left side of their body, continues across their body as contact is made with the ball, and ends on the right side of their body. It can be executed with either one hand or with both and is generally considered more difficult to master than the forehand. For most of the 20th century, the backhand was performed with one hand, using either an eastern or a continental grip. The first notable players to use two hands were the 1930s Australians Vivian McGrath and John Bromwich, but they were lonely exceptions. The two-handed grip gained popularity in the 1970s as Björn Borg, Chris Evert, Jimmy Connors, and later Mats Wilander and Andre Agassi used it to great effect, and it is now used by a large number of the world's best players, including Rafael Nadal and Serena Williams. Andy Roddick uses the extreme western grip to create massive amounts of top spin. It is difficult to do this and could possibly cause injury if done incorrectly. Two hands give the player more power, while one hand can generate a slice shot, applying backspin on the ball to produce a low trajectory bounce. The player long considered to have had the best backhand of all time, Don Budge, had a powerful one-handed stroke in the 1930s and 1940s that imparted topspin onto the ball. Ken Rosewall, another player noted for his one-handed backhand, used a very accurate slice backhand through the 1950s and 1960s. A small number of players, notably Monica Seles, use two hands on both the backhand and forehand sides.

A volley is made in the air before the ball bounces, generally near the net, and is usually made with a stiff-wristed punching motion to hit the ball into an open area of the opponent's court. The half volley is made by hitting the ball on the rise just after it has bounced, once again generally in the vicinity of the net. The swinging volley is hit out of the air as the player approaches the net. It is an offensive shot used to take preparation time away from the opponent. From a poor defensive position on the baseline, the lob can be used as either an offensive or defensive weapon, hitting the ball high and deep into the opponent's court to either enable the lobber to get into better defensive position or to win the point outright by hitting it over the opponent's head. If the lob is not hit deeply enough into the other court, however, the opponent may then hit an overhead smash, a hard, serve-like shot, to try to end the point. Finally, if an opponent is deep in his court, a player may suddenly employ an unexpected drop shot, softly tapping the ball just over the net so that the opponent is unable to run in fast enough to retrieve it.

Tournaments are often organized by gender and number of players. Common tournament configurations include men's singles, women's singles, and doubles, where two players play on each side of the net. Tournaments may be arranged for specific age groups, with upper age limits for youth and lower age limits for senior players. Example of this include the Orange Bowl and Les Petits As. There are also tournaments for players with disabilities, such as wheelchair tennis and deaf tennis. In the four Grand Slam tournaments, the singles draws are limited to 128 people for each gender.

Players may also be matched by their skill level. According to how well a person does in sanctioned play, a player is given a rating that is adjusted periodically to maintain competitive matches. For example, the United States Tennis Association administers the National Tennis Rating Program, which rates players between 1.0 and 7.0 in 1/2 point increments. Average club players under this system would rate 3.0-4.5 while world class players would be 7.0 on this scale.

The four Grand Slam tournaments are considered to be the most prestigious tennis tournaments in the world. They are held annually and include, in chronological order, the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open. Apart from the Olympic Games, Davis Cup, Fed Cup, and Hopman Cup, they are the only tournaments regulated by the International Tennis Federation (ITF). The ITF's national associations, Tennis Australia (Australian Open), the French Tennis Federation (French Open), the United States Tennis Association (US Open), and the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club and Lawn Tennis Association (Wimbledon), are delegated the responsibility to organize these events.

Aside from the historical significance of these events, they also carry larger prize funds than any other tour event and are worth double the number of ranking points to the champion than in the next echelon of tournaments, the Masters 1000 (men) and Premier events (women). Another distinguishing feature is the number of players in the singles draw, 128, more than any other professional tennis tournament. This draw is composed of 32 seeded players, other players ranked in the world's top 100, qualifiers, and players who receive invitations through wild cards. Grand Slam men's tournaments have best-of-five set matches throughout. Grand Slam tournaments are among the small number of events that last two weeks, the others being the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California and the Miami Masters in Florida. Currently, the Grand Slam tournaments are the only tour events that have mixed doubles contests. Grand Slam tournaments are held in conjunction with wheelchair tennis tournaments (with the exception being Wimbledon, where the grass surface prevents this) and junior tennis competitions. Grand Slam tournaments are often seen as the culmination of a particular season, such as the US Open Series. These tournaments also contain their own idiosyncrasies. For example, players at Wimbledon are required to wear predominantly white, a rule that has motivated certain players, such as Andre Agassi, to skip the tournament.

The ATP World Tour Masters 1000 is a group of nine tournaments that form the second-highest echelon in men's tennis. Each event is held annually, and a win at one of these events is worth 500 ranking points. When the Association of Tennis Professionals, led by Hamilton Jordan, began running the men's tour in 1990, the directors designated the top nine tournaments, outside of the Grand Slam events, as "Super Nine" events. These eventually became the Tennis Masters Series. In November at the end of the tennis year, the world's top eight players compete in the ATP World Tour Finals, a tournament with a rotating locale. It is currently held in Shanghai, China, and will move to London in 2009.

In 2009, the Tennis Masters Series will undergo several changes. The series will be renamed again, this time as the "Masters 1,000 Series", a reference to the number of points the champion of each event will garner. (All other tournaments will have their ranking points adjusted proportionately.) The Tennis Masters Cup, in addition to its relocation, will be renamed the "ATP World Tour Finals". However, Shanghai will host a new Masters 1,000 Series event. The Monte Carlo and Hamburg events were originally downgraded; however, the Monte Carlo tournament was eventually granted Masters 1,000 Series status, with the exception being that the event would not be mandatory. The ATP also plans to be more stringent in its examination of players who withdraw from Masters 1,000 Series events. Each player who withdraws will be examined by a medical panel. The ATP plans to fine, and even suspend, players who disregard these rules.

The International Series for men is split into two categories, both run by the ATP: the 250 Series and 500 Series. Like the Masters 1000, these events offer various amounts of prize money, and some regular International Series events offer larger prize monies than 500 Series tournaments. The Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships offer the largest financial incentive to players, with total prize money of US$1,426,000.

The Challenger Tour for men is the lowest level of tournament administered by the ATP. It is composed of roughly 160 events and, as a result, features a more diverse range of countries hosting events. The majority of players use the Challenger Series to work their way up the rankings, including World No. 1s Pete Sampras, Marcelo Ríos, Patrick Rafter, and Gustavo Kuerten. Andre Agassi, between winning Grand Slam titles, plummeted to World No. 141 and used Challenger Series events for match experience and to progress back up the rankings. The Challenger Series offers prize funds of between US$25,000 and US$150,000.

Below the Challenger Series are the Futures Tournaments, the main events on the ITF Men's Circuit. These tournaments also contribute towards a player's ATP rankings points. Futures Tournaments offer prize funds of between US$10,000 and US$15,000; however, futures status is granted only to events offering a total of US$30,000, meaning that two or three tournaments are played. Approximately 400 Futures Tournaments are played each year.

Premier events for women form the most prestigious level of events on the Women's Tennis Association Tour (WTA Tour) after the Grand Slam tournaments. These events offer the largest rewards in terms of points and prize money. The tiering system in women's tennis was introduced in 1988. At the time of its creation, only two tournaments, the Miami Masters in Florida and the Qatar Telecom German Open in Berlin, comprised the Premier category. In 2009, the category was expanded to include six tournaments, and subsequent additions to the category have resulted in nine events comprising the category today. Currently, two of these events (the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California and the Sony Ericsson Open) are held concurrently with men's Masters 1000 tournaments. In 2009, six Masters 1000 events will be combined with Premier WTA Tour tournaments.

Male players who have played at least part of their careers during the open era and who have won at least two Grand Slam singles titles are as follows: Pete Sampras (14), Roger Federer (13), Roy Emerson (12), Rod Laver (11), Björn Borg (11), Ken Rosewall (8), Jimmy Connors (8), Ivan Lendl (8), Andre Agassi (8), John Newcombe (7), John McEnroe (7), Mats Wilander (7), Boris Becker (6), Stefan Edberg (6), Rafael Nadal (6), Jim Courier (4), Guillermo Vilas (4), Arthur Ashe (3), Jan Kodeš (3), Gustavo Kuerten (3), Stan Smith (2), Ilie Năstase (2), Johan Kriek (2), Lleyton Hewitt (2), Yevgeny Kafelnikov (2), Patrick Rafter (2), Sergi Bruguera (2), and Marat Safin (2).

Female players who have played at least part of their careers during the open era and who have won at least two Grand Slam singles titles are as follows: Margaret Court (24), Steffi Graf (22), Chris Evert (18), Martina Navrátilová (18), Billie Jean King (12), Serena Williams (10), Monica Seles (9), Justine Henin (7), Evonne Goolagong Cawley (7), Venus Williams (7), Martina Hingis (5), Hana Mandlíková (4), Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (4), Maria Sharapova (3), Virginia Wade (3), Lindsay Davenport (3), Jennifer Capriati (3), Nancy Richey Gunter (2), Tracy Austin (2), Mary Pierce (2), and Amélie Mauresmo (2).

A frequent topic of discussion among tennis fans and commentators is who was the greatest male singles player of all time. No consensus has ever existed, however. By a large margin, an Associated Press poll in 1950 named Bill Tilden as the greatest player of the first half of the 20th century. From 1920-1930, Tilden won singles titles at Wimbledon three times and the U.S. Championships seven times. In 1938, however, Donald Budge became the first person to win all four Grand Slam singles titles during the same calendar year and won six consecutive Grand Slam singles titles in 1937 and 1938. Tilden called Budge "the finest player 365 days a year that ever lived." And in his 1979 autobiography, Jack Kramer said that, based on consistent play, Budge was the greatest player ever. Some observers, however, also felt that Kramer deserved consideration for the title. Kramer was among the few who dominated amateur and professional tennis during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Tony Trabert has said that of the players he saw before the start of the open era, Kramer was the best male champion.

During the open era, first Rod Laver and then more recently Björn Borg and Pete Sampras were regarded by many of their contemporaries as among the greatest ever. Cliff Drysdale has said that Laver is the greatest player ever. Mats Wilander said, "The greatest player ever is not necessarily the player who has won the most. I would say that Björn Borg is the greatest player ever because he won Wimbledon five times in a row. And out of those five times, he won the French Open all of those five years, plus another year." Laver has said that Sampras is "equal to anyone who has ever played the game." John McEnroe has said that either Laver or Sampras is the greatest player ever. Roger Federer is now considered by many observers to have the most "complete" game in modern tennis, with the potential to surpass the achievements of these past greats. Many experts of tennis, former tennis players and some of his own tennis peers believe Federer may become the greatest player in the history of the game. The tennis historian Raymond Lee did a statistical analysis account of the question, counting tournament wins totals and percentages of career match wins and wins in a 5 year period. His alltime list ranks Laver ahead of Borg and Tilden (tie), Federer, Gonzales, Rosewall, Budge, Lendl, Connors, Sampras in the top ten.

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Lleyton Hewitt

Lleyton Hewitt at Wimbledon, 2004.

Infobox last updated on: 23 February 2009.

Lleyton Glynn Hewitt (IPA: /ˈleɪtʌn ˈhjuːʌt/) (born 24 February 1981) is a tennis player from Australia. In 2001, he became the youngest male ever to be ranked number one. His career best achievements are winning the 2001 US Open and 2002 Wimbledon men's singles titles. In 2005, TENNIS Magazine put Hewitt in 34th place on its list of the 40 greatest tennis players since 1965.

Hewitt is known for his competitiveness and wins most of his matches with relentless aggression, fitness, consistent shots, and highly skilled footwork. Hewitt spent much time in the late stages of 2004 working with his former coach and good friend, Roger Rasheed, on bulking up his physique. His hard work paid off after he made it to the final of the 2005 Australian Open, before losing to Marat Safin in 4 sets (1–6, 6–3, 6–4, 6–4).

Hewitt might well have followed in the footsteps of his Australian rules football-playing father Glynn. Instead, he became one of the youngest winners of an Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) tournament when, as an almost unknown youngster, he won the 1998 Next Generation Adelaide International, defeating Andre Agassi in the semifinals. Only Aaron Krickstein winning Tel Aviv in 1983 and Michael Chang winning San Francisco in 1988 were younger when claiming their first ATP title.

In 2000, Hewitt won his first Grand Slam title when he and Max Mirnyi won the men's doubles championship at the US Open. Hewitt's first Grand Slam singles title was at the US Open in 2001, when he defeated then-four time champion Pete Sampras in straight sets.

In 2003 Hewitt had a good time by winning Indian Wells against former world nº1 Gustavo Kuerten, but at Wimbledon, as the defending champion, Hewitt lost in the first round of Wimbledon to qualifier Ivo Karlović. Hewitt became the first defending Wimbledon men's champion in the open era to lose in the first round. Only once before in the tournament's 126-year history had a defending men's champion lost in the opening round, when asf 1967 Manuel Santana was beaten by Charles Pasarell. Hewitt also was only the third defending champion to lose in the first round of a Grand Slam singles tournament, after Boris Becker in the 1997 Australian Open and Pat Rafter in the 1999 US Open.

After Wimbledon in 2003, Hewitt lost in the final of the tournament in Los Angeles, the second round of the ATP Masters Series tournament in Montreal, and the first round of the ATP Masters Series tournament in Cincinnati. At the US Open, Hewitt lost in the quarterfinals to Juan Carlos Ferrero 4–6, 6–3, 7–6(5), 6–1. Hewitt played only Davis Cup matches for the remainder of the year, using his time off to bulk up, gaining 7 kg.

In 2004, Hewitt became the first man in history to lose in each Grand Slam singles tournament to the eventual champion. At the Australian Open, he was defeated in the fourth round by Swiss Roger Federer. At the French Open, he was defeated in a quarterfinal by Argentine Gastón Gaudio. At Wimbledon, he was defeated in a quarterfinal by Federer. And at the US Open, he was defeated in the final by Federer, losing two out of the three sets at love.

At the year ending 2004 Tennis Masters Cup, Hewitt defeated Andy Roddick to advance to the final but was yet again defeated by defending champion Federer.

In 2005, Hewitt won his only title at the Sydney Medibank International. He reached his first Australian Open final by defeating World No. 2 Roddick, but was defeated by Marat Safin. At Wimbledon, he reached the semifinals, but lost to eventual champion Federer. Almost three months later, Hewitt again lost to Federer in the US Open semifinal, although this time he was able to take one set from the Swiss. Hewitt had at this point lost to the eventual champion at seven consecutive Grand Slam tournaments he played (he missed the 2005 French Open because of injury). Hewitt pulled out of the Tennis Masters Cup tournament in Shanghai in November 2005 so that he could be with his wife Bec as the birth of his first child grew near. He was replaced by Gastón Gaudio.

After a fairly frosty start to 2006, where Hewitt was defeated in the second round of the Australian Open, his results improved after some time away from the tour. He reached the finals of the San Jose and Las Vegas tournaments, losing to British youngster Andy Murray and American James Blake, respectively. But he lost to Tim Henman 7–6(5), 6–3 in the second round of the Miami Masters, a player he had defeated eight times previously in as many matches. At the 2006 French Open, Hewitt reached the fourth round where he lost to defending champion, and eventual winner, Rafael Nadal in four sets.

Hewitt won his first tournament of 2006 (after a 17 month hiatus from winning a tournament) when he beat Blake 6–4, 6–4 in the finals of the Queen's Club Championships. This was his fourth title there, thereby equalling the records of John McEnroe and Boris Becker. During the 2006 Wimbledon Championships, Hewitt survived a five-set match against South Korea's Hyung-Taik Lee that was played over two days. He then defeated Olivier Rochus and David Ferrer before losing to Marcos Baghdatis in the quarterfinals. At the 2006 Legg Mason Tennis Classic in Washington, D.C., Hewitt was defeated by Arnaud Clément 7–6(1), 6–4 in a quarterfinal after defeating Vincent Spadea in the second round and Denis Gremelmayr in the third round. Hewitt participated at the 2006 US Open despite having an injured knee. Hewitt won his first three matches in straight sets against, respectively, Albert Montañés, Jan Hernych, and Novak Đoković. He defeated Richard Gasquet 6–4, 6–4, 4–6, 3–6, 6–3 in the fourth round to advance to the quarterfinals for the seventh consecutive year. He then lost to Roddick 6–3, 7–5, 6–4.

At the 2007 Australian Open, Hewitt lost in the third round to the tenth seeded Chilean and eventual runner-up Fernando González 6–2, 6–2, 5–7, 6–4. With his win in Las Vegas in March 2007, Hewitt has won at least one ATP title annually for ten consecutive years. This was a record among active players at the time.

Hewitt reached the 2007 Hamburg Masters semifinals, where he pushed eventual finalist Rafael Nadal to three sets. At the 2007 French Open, Hewitt, for the 2nd straight time at Roland Garros, lost in the 4th round to Rafael Nadal 6–3, 6–1, 7–6(5). At the 2007 Wimbledon Championships, Hewitt won his first three matches, including a four-set third round victory over Guillermo Cañas. He then faced 4th seed Novak Đoković in the fourth round which he lost 7–6, 7–6, 4–6, 7–6.

After Wimbledon, it was announced that he had hired former Australian tennis pro, Tony Roche, to coach him during Grand Slam and Masters tournaments in 2007 and 2008. At the Masters tournaments in Montréal and Cincinnati Hewitt reached the quarter- and semifinals, respectively. In both cases, he lost to Roger Federer.

He was seeded 16 at the 2007 U.S. Open, but for the first time in eight consecutive appearances at Flushing Meadows, he did not reach the quarterfinals or further. He lost in the second round to Argentine Agustín Calleri.

At the 2008 Australian Open, he advanced to the fourth round as the 19th seed, defeating 15th-seeded and 2006 Australian Open finalist Marcos Baghdatis in a thrilling match, 4–6, 7–5, 7–5, 6–7 (4), 6–3. Destined to be his last win at the Australian Open, the 282 minute match started at 11:52pm and ended at 4:34am the following morning, Melbourne time. It was a characteristically "gutsy" performance and cemented Hewitt's reputation as a tough competitor. Hewitt lost his fourth round match in straight sets to the 3rd seeded and eventual champion Novak Đoković 7–5 6–3 6–3.

A hip injury Hewitt acquired in March 2008 affected his preparation for the French open, and forced the loss of 300 rankings points as Hewitt was unable to defend his Semi Final appearance at the Hamburg Masters as well as compete in supplementary tournaments.

However, Hewitt made the third round at Roland Garros before losing a 5 set thriller to fifth seed David Ferrer 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6.

Despite his ongoing hip problem Hewitt was able to compete at the Queens Club Championship with moderate success, falling to second seed Novak Djokovic in the Quarter Finals 2-6, 2-6. His good form continued into Wimbledon, Hewitt making the fourth round for the second successive year before facing world number 1 and first seed Roger Federer, a match that Federer took 7-6(7), 6-2, 6-4.

After Wimbledon Hewitt elected to miss the Montreal and Cincinnati Masters in an effort to give his hip sufficient rest to enable him to play at the 2008 Beijing Olympics where he defeated Jonas Björkman in the first round 7-5 7-6(7-2) before losing to second seed Rafael Nadal 6-1 6-2. However, the more notable incident in the Olympics occurred in Hewitt's opening round doubles match with Chris Guccione against Argentines Juan Mónaco and Agustín Calleri. The match went to an advantage 3rd set with Hewitt and Gucicone prevailing 18-16.

After the Olympics due to the further damage Hewitt's hip sustained at the Olympics, he was left with no option but to pull out of the US open and skip the rest of the season to have hip surgery.

2008 was the first year that Hewitt didn't win a title since 1998.

After returning from hip surgery Hewitt played his first match in 2009 at the Hopman Cup where he defeated Nicholas Kiefer in 3 sets.

Hewitt lost his 2009 match against Fernando Gonzalez in the 2009 Australian Open after 5 sets.

At the 2009 Regions Morgan Keegan Championships and the Cellular South Cup he caused an upset by defeating James Blake in three sets, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. He then defeated fellow Australian Chris Guccione in the second round 6-2, 7-6(4), and Christophe Rochus in the Quarter Finals 6-2, 6-3. He faced Andy Roddick in the Semi Finals but lost in a close match 6-2, 6-7(4), 4-6.

Hewitt lost in the first round of the 2009 Delray Beach International Tennis Championships to Yen-Hsun Lu, the eighth seed, 5-7, 6-2, 2-6.

On 19 November 2001, Hewitt became the youngest male ever to be ranked World number one (20 years old). He stayed No. 1 until 28 April 2003, a streak of 75 weeks. After two weeks ranked second, he returned to No. 1 for five weeks. Since then, his highest ranking has been No. 2. However, following his early exit from the 2009 Australian Open, Hewitt fell to world No. 108, his lowest ranking in 10 years the first time an Australian male players hasn't been ranked inside the top 100 for the first time. This was short-lived, however, when Hewitt entered the Top 100 again on February 23rd.

Hewitt was a part of the Australian Davis Cup Team that won the Davis Cup in 1999 and 2003 and reached the final in 2000 and 2001. By the age of 22, he had recorded more wins in Davis Cup singles than any other Australian player.

In 2003, Hewitt led the Australian team to victory when he defeated Juan Carlos Ferrero in the opening rubber 3–6, 6–3, 3–6, 7–6, 6–2.

In the 2006 quarterfinals in Melbourne, Hewitt defeated Belarusian Vladimir Voltchkov 6–2, 6–1, 6–2 in just 91 minutes. Voltchkov said before the match that "Hewitt has no weapons to hurt me." Hewitt responded, "Voltchkov doesn't have a ranking to hurt me." In the semifinals in Buenos Aires on clay, Hewitt lost to Argentine José Acasuso 1–6, 6–4, 4–6, 6–2, 6–1.

In February 2007, Australia led by Hewitt lost in the first round to Belgium in Belgium on clay. Hewitt lost to then World No. 41 Kristof Vliegen, and his teammate Chris Guccione also lost his first singles match. Although Hewitt won both his doubles match with Paul Hanley and singles match against Olivier Rochus to get Australia back in contention, Guccione could not prevent an Australian first round exit, their first since 2004.

Darren Cahill, Jason Stoltenberg and Roger Rasheed are all former coaches of his. Hewitt is currently coached by Tony Roche .

Hewitt is a defensive baseline counterpuncher. He typically likes to stay back towards the baseline during a rally and will usually approach the net only to catch a short reply or drop shot from his opponent. His strength is his return game and he is often described as being among the best returners of serve in the game. Although he doesn't have the devastating return of Andre Agassi who is often regarded as the best returner of serve ever, at the 2004 Cincinnati Masters final commentator MaliVai Washington said that Hewitt was even more difficult to "ace" than Agassi because he gets more returns in play. Hewitt's tactics typically involve putting difficult service returns in play, consistently chasing down attempted winning shots from his opponent, and waiting for his opponent to make an error.

Although he is known primarily as a baseline defender, Hewitt is actually a skilled volleyer and is known for having one of the best overhead smashes in the game. He also has underrated variety in his shots and will occasionally use a drop shot or drop volley to win a point. His signature shot, however, is the offensive topspin lob, a shot that he executes efficiently off both wings when his opponent approaches the net. US Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe and Jim Courier have both described Hewitt's lob as being the best in the world.

However, the area which has plagued Hewitt his whole career and has prevented him from achieving further success is his serve. The main problem with Hewitt's serve is that it is very flat and this does not give him much margin for error. Hewitt's height also means that he hits his serve with a lower projectile and this reduces his serve's effectiveness. Also, Hewitt's inability to hit a consistent 'kick' serve (rather he opts for a faster, riskier, slice serve) on his second serve often leads to him hitting numerous double faults. When serving to the deuce court, Hewitt frequently chooses to deliver a wide, sliced serve on his second serve. While this serve often forces return errors from his opponents, it is relatively risky and is a source of many of Hewitt's double faults. Throughout his career, Hewitt has made the decision to go strictly for aces and service winners on his first serve. Since 2005, he has powered up his first serve by lifting weights to become stronger and he is capable of serving up to 125mph. Although this does often allow him to achieve many aces in a match for a player his height (5' 10 1/2"), it lowers his serving percentage substantially. Hewitt often has a first serve percentage below 50%. His service motion he rocks his forward foot back (ala Pete Sampras) but then twists his feet sideways and launches into the court off of his toes. This unusual technique often causes Hewitt to "foot fault" in many of his matches because his left foot can easily go over the line. An interesting fact about Hewitt's serve is that he has an odd tendency to look at his opponent right before making impact with the ball on his serve.

Hewitt is known for his tenacity. More than once, he has been close to losing a match in straight sets only to come back and win. For example, in the 2003 Davis Cup semifinal against Switzerland in Melbourne, Australia, Roger Federer served for the match, and came within two points of victory, in the third set. Hewitt came back to win 5–7, 2–6, 7–6(4), 7–5, 6–1.

Hewitt is a huge fan of the Rocky films. In his junior years, he was often heard saying "Come on Balboa" after winning crucial points in his matches. As a senior player, he is still heard shouting "Come on" at turning points during matches, often simultaneously pointing his fingers at his face for added effect.

In a five set match with James Blake at the 2001 US Open, Hewitt complained to umpire Andres Egli and asked for a black linesman to be moved after being called for two foot-faults in the third set. "Look at him", Hewitt said, gesturing at the linesman. He approached the chair umpire and, pointing first to the offending linesman and then to Blake, said, "Look at him and you tell me what the similarity is." Some witnesses, including Blake, had suggested that the "similarity" referred to the colour shared by Blake and the linesman. Hewitt claimed he had merely pointed out that the same linesman had foot-faulted him on both occasions, while other officials had made no such calls.

During the 2001 French Open he was fined US$1000 for calling the chair umpire, Andreas Egli, a "spastic." Hewitt denied this.

Hewitt blamed his losses at the 2005 and 2006 Australian Open on uncooperative maintenance of the courts by the tournament directors. "I don't think there's been a lot of homework done on how the balls play on this surface", he said. "Mate, it could be slower than the French Open." Hewitt was disappointed that the organisers had ignored his concerns about the courts. "I feel like I'm fighting with people that we should be working together to try and make Australian tennis better", he said. Since then, long-time Australian Open chief executive Paul McNamee has resigned, leaving new tournament director Craig Tiley to confirm that the main aim for 2007 was to provide "uniformity and consistency" when the stadium's match and practice courts were resurfaced in November 2006. The courts will be as fast as they were in the second week of the 2006 tournament.

Hewitt is disliked by some Pro Tour players. Mary Carillo said: "He makes guys crazy, they try hard to ignore him, but he's always barking on the other side of the net." In his 2005 Australian Open match against Argentine Juan Ignacio Chela, Hewitt angered his opponent by his celebration of an unforced error, to the point where Chela served directly at Hewitt, and spat at him during the changeover.

In 2006 Hewitt was nominated by GQ magazine as one of the '10 Most Hated Athletes' in Sport . That year, he also came under criticism from Australian child psychologist Michael Carr-Gregg for "exploiting" his child during the 2006 Logie Awards. During a match at the 2005 Australian Open, David Nalbandian and Hewitt purposefully bumped into each other at a change of ends. Nalbandian later remarked that "no-one on the tour is friends with Hewitt" and that Hewitt is "not a gentleman".

Hewitt is a keen supporter of Australian rules football, having played the game earlier in his career and is no.1 ticket holder for the Adelaide Crows. He once had a close friendship with Crows star Andrew McLeod, but this broke down over much public controversy.

Hewitt had a four-year relationship with highly-ranked Belgian tennis player Kim Clijsters. The two announced their engagement just before Christmas 2003 but separated in October 2004, in effect canceling a planned February 2005 wedding.

Shortly after losing the final of the 2005 Australian Open, Hewitt proposed to Australian actress Bec Cartwright on 30 January after they had been dating for six weeks. They married on 21 July 2005. Their first child, a daughter named Mia Rebecca Hewitt, was born on 29 November 2005.. Their second child, a son named Cruz Lleyton Hewitt, was born in Sydney on 11 December 2008.

Hewitt is currently sponsored by the Japanese sports manufacterer Yonex, with whom he signed a "Head to Toe" deal with in late 2005. Yonex provides all of Hewitt's clothing, racquets, shoes and accessories. Hewitt's Yonex shoes (SHT-306) are inscribed with his nickname "Rusty" along with an image of an Australian flag. As of 7 August 2007, his first appearance with a new racquet at the Montreal Masters, Hewitt used to use the Yonex RQiS Tour-1. He now uses the RDS 001 2008 model. His previous racquet, the Yonex RDS 001 Mid also featured his nickname on the throat of the racquet.

Hewitt has a sister, Jaslyn Hewitt, also a former tennis player and currently a bodybuilder. She used to date another tennis pro, Joachim Johansson.

To help interpret the performance table, the legend below explains what each abbreviation and color coded box represents in the performance timeline.

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only once a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded. This table stops before the 2008 French Open, which started on 25 May 2008.

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Andy Roddick

Infobox last updated on: February 23, 2009.

Andrew Stephen "Andy" Roddick (born August 30, 1982) is an American professional tennis player, and a former World No. 1.

He is the 6th-ranked player in the world, and top-ranked in the U.S., as of February 2, 2009. He became a Grand Slam singles champion when he won the title at the 2003 U.S. Open. Roddick has reached three other Grand Slam finals (Wimbledon twice, and the U.S. Open), losing to Roger Federer each time. He and Federer are the only players to have finished the season in the ATP top 10 each of the past seven years. Roddick is known for his powerful serves and forehands, and holds the fastest serve recorded in professional tennis, clocked at 155 mph (249.5 km/h).

Roddick was on the United States Davis Cup team which won the 2007 Davis Cup. Roddick defeated Dmitry Tursunov of the Russian Davis Cup team, the defending champions, in the finals.

Roddick was born in Omaha, Nebraska to Jim and Blanche Roddick. Roddick's father was a businessman, and his mother was a school teacher. She now directs the Andy Roddick Foundation. Roddick has two older brothers, Lawrence and John (All-American tennis player at University of Georgia (1996-98)), who were both promising tennis players at a young age.

Roddick lived in Austin, Texas, from age 4 until he was 10, then moved to Boca Raton, Florida in the interest of his brother John's tennis career, where he lived until graduating from Boca Prep in 2000. Roddick played varsity basketball in high school alongside Davis Cup teammate Mardy Fish, who trained and lived with Roddick in 1999. During that time period, he sometimes trained with Venus and Serena Williams; he later moved back to Austin.

Roddick began dating singer Mandy Moore in 2002. Moore, after reading a magazine article about him, thought he was really cute, so she sent her mom, who was attending a tournament in Toronto, to invite him to her set on a movie she was shooting nearby, "How to Deal." Roddick accepted, and they began dating. Roddick ended the relationship in March 2004.

Roddick was flipping through the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue when he spotted Brooklyn Decker, a fashion model. He had his agent contact hers. The two have been dating since at least the 2007 Davis Cup. On March 31, 2008, Roddick announced on his website that he and Brooklyn Decker are engaged, and will be getting married in the spring of 2009.

Roddick seriously considered quitting competitive tennis at the age of 17, when he had a losing streak in the juniors. His coach talked him into giving tennis four more months of undivided attention.

Roddick finished as the # 1 junior in the U.S. in 1999-2000, and as the # 1 junior in the world in 2000. He won six world junior singles and seven doubles titles, and won the US Open and Australian Open junior singles titles in 2000.

In March in Miami, in the first round Roddick had his first major victory as he beat world # 41 Fernando Vicente of Spain, 6-4, 6-0. In August in Washington, DC, he beat world # 30 Fabrice Santoro of France, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Roddick played the Banana Bowl in the city of São Paulo and won, beating Joachim Johansson in the final match. Roddick also won the Australian Junior Open, defeating Mario Ancic in the final.

In 2001, Roddick defeated Michael Chang in 5 sets in the second round of the French Open. During Wimbledon, he further showed potential by taking a set from eventual winner Goran Ivanišević. He also defeated 7-time Wimbledon champion, world # 4, and fellow American Pete Sampras, at the age of 19, at the Miami Masters, 7-6 (2), 6-3 in March, and world # 1 Gustavo Kuerten of Brazil 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-2 in August.

Despite a lackluster French Open, Roddick enjoyed success in the United Kingdom by winning Queen's Club (beating world # 2 Agassi 6-1, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (6) along the way) and reaching the Wimbledon semifinals, where he lost to eventual champion Federer in straight sets. He avenged that loss in August, beating world # 3 Federer in Montreal, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (3).

Roddick's hardcourt record in 2003 included his first Masters Series titles – coming at Canada and Cincinnati – and his first Grand Slam title.

At the U.S. Open, Roddick rallied from two sets down and a match point against him in the semifinals to beat David Nalbandian 6-7 (4), 3-6, 7-6 (7), 6-1, 6-3. He then defeated world # 3 Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final, 6–3, 7–6, 6–3.

At the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston he defeated world # 7 Carlos Moya of Spain, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3, and world # 4 Guillermo Coria of Argentina, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-3.

By the end of the year, at age 21, he was ranked # 1, the first American to finish a year at # 1 since Andre Agassi in 1999. He also became the youngest American to hold this rank since computer rankings were started in 1973.

In April Roddick again beat world # 6 Moya, this time 5-7, 6-2, 7-5. Roddick was knocked out during the 2004 U.S. Open in a five-set quarterfinal against another big server, Joachim Johansson. Later in Septmember in Bankok he beat world # 9 Marat Safin of Russia, 7-6 (1), 6-7 (7), 7-6 (2).

At the 2004 Summer Olympics, Roddick lost to Chilean Fernando González, the eventual bronze medal winner, in the third round.

In November he beat world # 7 Tim Henman of Great Britain 7-5, 7-6 (6), world # 4 Safin, 7-6 (7), 7-6 (4), and world # 6 Coria 7-6 (4), 6-3.

Later that year, Roddick teamed up with Mardy Fish and Bob and Mike Bryan on the U.S. Davis Cup team that lost to Spain in the final in Seville. Roddick lost his singles match against Rafael Nadal, who would in the following year win the French Open.

Towards the end of 2004, Roddick fired his coach of 18 months, Brad Gilbert, and hired assistant Davis Cup coach Dean Goldfine.

Roddick finished 2004 ranked as the world # 2, the U.S.'s # 1, and the player with the most aces (1,017).

In 2004 Roddick saved fellow tennis player Sjeng Schalken and other guests (including close friends Ben Campezi and Dean Monroe) from a hotel fire.

Roddick's first 2005 tournament victory was the SAP Open in San Jose, California, where he became the first to win the event in consecutive years since Mark Philippoussis in 1999 and 2000. The top-seeded Roddick defeated Cyril Saulnier 6–0, 6–4 in 50 minutes, the event's first championship shutout set since Arthur Ashe beat Guillermo Vilas in 1975.

In March he defeated World No. 7 Carlos Moya 6–7 (4), 6–4, 6–1. In April, Roddick won the U.S. Men's Claycourt Championships, reclaiming the title he won in 2001 and 2002. (He lost in 2003 to Agassi, and in 2004 to Tommy Haas.) In May, Roddick had match point against Spain's Fernando Verdasco. Verdasco was attempted to save the match point on his second serve, when the linesman erroneously called the serve out. If this call had held, Roddick would have won the match. Roddick motioned to the umpire, pointing to the clear ball mark on the clay indicating the ball was in, and the call was consequently changed. Verdasco went on to win the match.

At the French Open, Roddick lost to the unseeded Argentine José Acasuso in the second round, and at Wimbledon, Roddick lost to Federer in the final for the second consecutive year. In August, he defeated World No. 3 Lleyton Hewitt, 6–4, 7–6 (4) at the Masters Series tournament in Cincinnati.

At the US Open, Roddick was defeated by World No. 70 Gilles Müller in the first round. Roddick's last US Open first round loss had been in 2000. At the Grand Prix de Tennis de Lyon, Roddick defeated Gaël Monfils to wrap up a tournament without losing a set or getting his serve broken.

Roddick's first ATP event of the year was the Australian Open. There he reached the fourth round before being upset by unseeded and eventual finalist, Marcos Baghdatis. At the French Open Roddick retired in the first round, after sustaining a foot injury during the match. Two weeks later at Wimbledon, Roddick was upset in the third round by British hopeful Andy Murray. This loss caused Roddick to fall below the top 10 for the first time since 2002.

After Wimbledon, Roddick began working with a new coach, tennis legend Jimmy Connors. In his first event with his new coach, Roddick reached the final of Indianapolis before losing to good friend, and fellow American, James Blake. His resurgence finally came at the Cincinnati Masters, where he won the event by defeating Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final, making this the first masters event he won since 2004. At the U.S. Open, Roddick easily won his first two matches against Florent Serra and Kristian Pless. He then played a thriller five-set match against Fernando Verdasco, winning 6-2 in the final set. Next he beat Benjamin Becker, who was coming off a huge win against recently retired Andre Agassi. In the quarterfinals, Roddick beat Lleyton Hewitt, avenging his loss in 2002, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. Now in the semifinals for the first time since he won in 2003, Roddick played Mikhail Youzhny, and beat him 6-7, 6-0, 7-6, 6-3. In the finals of a Grand Slam for the first time since Wimbledon a year prior, Roddick was to play world # 1 Federer. He lost however, 2-6, 6-4, 5-7, 1-6. He then qualified for the year-ending Tennis Masters Cup, where he defeated world # 4 Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia 6-4, 6-7 (9), 6-1, but lost in the round robin to world # 1 Federer 6–4, 6–7 (8), 4–6 in a tough three-set battle.

Roddick entered the 2007 Australian Open as the sixth seed. In his first round match, he lost a marathon first-set tiebreak 20-18, but eventually won the match in four sets against wild card Jo-Wilfried Tsonga from France. Roddick defeated 26th-seeded Marat Safin in the third round, and 9th seeded Mario Ančić in a five-set fourth round match. Roddick won his quarterfinal match against fellow American Mardy Fish 6–2, 6–2, 6–2. His run ended in the semifinals by world # 1 Federer, who defeated him in straight sets 6–4, 6–0, 6–2, making his head-to-head record against Federer 1-13.

In first round Davis Cup action, Roddick helped the U.S. defeat the Czech Republic, winning his singles matches against Ivo Minář and Tomáš Berdych.

Roddick reached at least the semifinals of his next two tournaments. He bowed out to Andy Murray in the semifinals of the SAP Open in San Jose, California, a reprise of 2006. Roddick then defeated Murray in the semifinals of the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships and the Cellular South Cup in Memphis, Tennessee, before losing in the final to defending champion Tommy Haas 6–3, 6–2. Reaching the final, however, enabled Roddick to overtake Nikolay Davydenko for the world # 3 position, his first week inside the top three since March 6, 2006.

At the first ATP Masters Series tournament of the year, after beating world # 8 Ljubicic 6-4, 6-7 (9), 6-1, Roddick reached the semifinals of the Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells, California, lost to world # 2 Rafael Nadal 6–4, 6–3.

Roddick then played the Miami Masters, where he retired from his quarterfinal match against Andy Murray due to a left hamstring injury.

Roddick then helped the U.S. defeat Spain and advance to the Davis Cup semifinals, winning his lone singles match against Fernando Verdasco 7–6 (5), 6–1, 6–4. However, Roddick re-aggravated his hamstring injury during the Davis Cup tie, and was subsequently forced to pull out of the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships in Houston, Texas. Roddick also announced that he would withdraw from the Monte Carlo Masters, citing the injury.

His next tournament was at the Internazionali d'Italia. After a first round bye, he won his first match against Gastón Gaudio, where he saved all three break points and fired nine aces. However, he was unable to stop Juan Ignacio Chela in the third round, losing 6–0, 6–4.

Roddick then withdrew from the Masters Series Hamburg tournament because, according to his website, he needed time to physically prepare himself for the upcoming French Open. Roddick was seeded third at the French Open, but was eliminated in the first round by Russian Igor Andreev in four sets 6-3, 4-6, 3-6, 4-6.

Roddick was victorious at the Stella Artois Championships for the fourth time when he defeated Nicolas Mahut in the final 4–6, 7–6 (7), 7–6 (2).

At Wimbledon, Roddick was seeded third and considered one of the pre-tournament favorites behind Federer and Nadal. He reached the quarterfinals after wins against Justin Gimelstob of the U.S., Danai Udomchoke of Thailand, Fernando Verdasco of Spain, and Paul-Henri Mathieu of France. In the quarterfinals, Roddick lost in five close sets to Richard Gasquet of France 4–6, 4–6, 7–6 (2), 7–6 (3), 8–6.

During the summer hardcourt season, Roddick played four tournaments in four weeks. Roddick made it to the semifinals of the Indianapolis Tennis Championships, where he was upset by Frank Dancevic of Canada 6–4, 7–6 (1). The next week, however, Roddick claimed his second ATP title of the year by winning the Legg Mason Tennis Classic in Washington, D.C. for the third time, when he beat American newcomer John Isner 6–4, 7–6 (4). He then lost in the quarterfinals of the Rogers Cup in Montreal to Novak Đoković, and in the third round of the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters tournament in Cincinnati, Ohio to David Ferrer of Spain.

At the U.S. Open, Roddick defeated Gimelstob in the first round 7–6 (6), 6–3, 6–3. He won his next three matches, one in straight sets and the other two when his opponent retired. In the quarterfinals, Roddick once again lost to Federer 7–6 (5), 7–6 (4), 6–2, bringing his head-to-head record with Federer 1-14. There were no breaks of serve and only one break point total in the first two sets, that being on Federer's serve.

Two weeks later, Roddick anchored the U.S. Davis Cup team during its 4–1 semifinal defeat of Sweden. Roddick won both his singles matches, opening the tie with a defeat of Joachim Johansson 7–6 (4), 7–6 (3), 6–3, and clinching it with a 6–2, 7–6 (3), 6–4 victory over Jonas Björkman. This was the ninth time in nine tries that Roddick has clinched a tie for the American team.

Roddick's then set his sights on the Madrid Masters, but pulled out, citing a knee injury. At his next tournament two weeks later in Lyon, France, Roddick lost in the first round to frenchman Fabrice Santoro 7–6 (5), 2–6, 6–4. Roddick then withdrew from the Paris Masters, incurring a $22,600 fine for not fulfilling his media obligations at the tournament.

At the season-ending Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai, Roddick defeated world # 4 Nikolay Davydenko 6–3, 4–6, 6–2 in his first round-robin match, and then defeated world # 7 Fernando González in his next match to become the first player to qualify for the semifinals of the tournament. In his third and final round-robin match, Roddick lost once again to Federer, 6–4, 6–2 for the 15th time in 16 career matches. In the semifinals, Roddick lost 6–1, 6–3 to # 6 seed David Ferrer, who had won all three of his round-robin matches. This was Roddick's third semifinal finish out of the last five years at the Tennis Masters Cup (he reached the semifinals in 2003 and 2004, withdrew in 2005, and failed to advance to the semifinals in 2006 after a 1–2 round-robin record).

Roddick finished the year by helping the U.S. defeat Russia and win the 2007 Davis Cup, its 32nd Davis Cup victory but first since 1995. Roddick won his rubber against Dmitry Tursunov 6–4, 6–4, 6–2, before James Blake and Bob and Mike Bryan completed the victory. Having secured the tie with an unassailable 3–0 lead, Roddick decided to sit out his second singles match of the tie.

Roddick started 2008 strongly, defeating Ljubičić 6–3, 6–0, and Safin 6–3, 6–3 to reach AAMI Kooyong Classic final for four consecutive seasons. In the final, he defeated Baghdatis 7–5, 6–3 to win the tournament for the third consecutive year.

Roddick was seeded sixth in the 2008 Australian Open. In the first round, he defeated Lukáš Dlouhý of the Czech Republic 6–3, 6–4, 7–5. In the second round, he defeated German Michael Berrer 6–2, 6–2, 6–4. He then lost to the # 29 seed Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany in the third round in a 5-set match 4–6, 6–3, 6–7 (9), 7–6 (3), 6–8. Despite losing, Roddick served a career-high of 42 aces in a match.

Roddick won his 24th career title and his 3rd title at the SAP Open in San Jose, California. He defeated the Czech Radek Štěpánek in straight sets, 6–4, 7–5.

Roddick's next tournament was the Dubai Tennis Championships. He made it to the semi-finals by defeating world # 2 Rafael Nadal of Spain 7–6 (5), 6–2, his first victory over Nadal since the second round of the 2004 US Open. The win also marked Roddick's first victory over a player ranked in the top two since June 2003. He progressed through to the finals by defeating world # 3 and 2008 Australian Open Singles Champion Novak Djokovic 7–6 (5), 6–3 in the semi-final. By making it to the final, he became the first American to reach the Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships final in the tournament's 16-year history. In the final he defeated Feliciano López 6–7 (8), 6–4, 6–2, to win his 25th career title.

Following Roddick's quarterfinal match in Dubai, he announced that he had split with his coach of two years, Jimmy Connors. Connors had resigned a week earlier, saying he wanted to spend more time with his family. Roddick would continue to be coached by his brother, John Roddick. He then fell to former world # 2 Tommy Haas at the Indian Wells Masters in the 2nd round, 6–4, 6–4.

At the 2008 Miami Masters, Roddick advanced to the semifinals after defeating world # 1 Federer 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-3 an hour after proposing to Brooklyn Decker, bringing his head-to-head record against Federer to 2-15. Roddick improved to 3-0 against top-3 players in 2008. Roddick lost in the semi-finals to Davydenko 6-7 (5), 2-6. Roddick's next tournament was the Masters tournament in Rome. There he equaled his best result by reaching the semifinals, where he retired against Stanislas Wawrinka in the pair's first encounter, due to a back injury.

Roddick was forced to pull out of the 2008 French Open due to a shoulder injury. After a visit to a doctor in New York it was determined this was nothing more than an inflammation of the rotator cuff. His first tournament after the shoulder injury was the Artois Championship, his annual Wimbledon preparation, where he was the defending champion after winning the title last year, one of four wins at the tournament. In the tournament, Roddick defeated Mardy Fish and Andy Murray before losing to eventual champion Nadal in the semi-finals.

In the 2008 Wimbledon, Roddick suffered a 2nd round defeat to Serbia's Janko Tipsarević 6–7 (5), 7–5, 6–4, 7–6 (4). This was his earliest exit at Wimbledon.

Roddick was beaten at the Toronto Masters in the third round by Marin Čilić, 4-6, 6-4, 4-6. He was then forced to pull out of the Cincinnati Masters following a neck injury, which he said may have been caused by a poor sleeping posture. He stated in an interview that the neck injury had nothing to do with his shoulder injury.

Roddick did not participate in the 2008 Summer Olympics, with his reason being to concentrate on the 2008 US Open.

In order to prepare for the US Open, Roddick then played in the smaller hard court tournaments in the US Open Series, including those at Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. At the Countrywide Classic in Los Angeles, Roddick lost to Juan Martín del Potro in the final, 1-6, 6-7 (2).

At the 2008 US Open, Roddick defeated Fabrice Santoro in the first round 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Roddick then won his next 3 matches against Ernests Gulbis, Andreas Seppi, and Fernando González. In the quarterfinals, Roddick lost to the World No. 3 and reigning Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic 2-6, 3-6, 6-3, 6-7 (5) bringing his head-to-head record to 1-2.

Roddick captured his 26th ATP title in Beijing at the China Open on September 28, 2008. He defeated Dudi Sela of Israel, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 6-3. The victory was part of Roddick's strong showing in Asia, as he reached the semifinal round of the AIG Japan Open where he lost to eventual champion Tomáš Berdych after squandering a 5-3 lead in the third and deciding set.

In the third round of the Madrid Masters he lost to Frenchman Gaël Monfils in three sets 4-6, 6-3, 3-6. Two weeks later, Roddick reached the quarterfinals of Paris Masters by defeating Frenchman Gilles Simon, 6-3, 7-5, before losing to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. Due to his performance in the tournament, Roddick automatically qualified for the season-ending Tennis Masters Cup. At the Masters Cup in Shanghai, he played Andy Murray in his first round robin match and lost 4-6, 6-1, 1-6. He was then scheduled to play Federer, but retired due to an ankle injury and was replaced by Štěpánek.

He hired Larry Stefanki as his new coach, and started working with him on December 1. Stefanki had previously trained John McEnroe, Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Fernando González, and Tim Henman. Under his guidance both Marcelo Rios and Kafelnikov became world number one.

After losing the exhibition championship Capitala World Tennis in Abu Dhabi, Roddick began his 2009 season by playing at the Qatar ExxonMobil Open. He defeated Ivan Navarro, Arnaud Clement, and Victor Hanescu in the early rounds. In the semifinals he beat Gael Monfils in a closely fought match, 7–6, 3–6, 6–3, to set up a final with Andy Murray, which he lost 6–4, 6–2.

At the first round of the 2009 Australian Open, Roddick beat Bjorn Rehnquist, before Roddick battled from a set down to defeat Xavier Malisse 4–6, 6–2, 7–6 (1), 6–2 in the second. After following this up with victories over Fabrice Santoro and 21-seed Tommy Robredo, Roddick played the defending champion and world # 3 Novak Djokovic in the quarterfinals. Djokovic retired in the fourth set, 6–7 (3), 6–4, 6–2, 2–1, allowing Roddick to reach the fourth Australian Open semifinal of his career. Roddick was defeated in the semifinals by eventual runner-up Federer, 6–2, 7–5, 7–5, bringing their head-to-head series to 2-16.

In the SAP Open, Roddick beat qualifier Michael Ryderstedt 6-0, 7-6 (3) in 62 minutes. He defeated his next opponent, Ernests Gulbis, 6-3, 7-6 (3). Roddick saved four break points on serve in the second set, and converted on his first of three match points in the tie-break to secure the win in one hour and 20 minutes. He then snapped a three-match losing streak against Tommy Haas in his quarterfinal match, securing the 7-5, 6-4 in one hour and 37 minutes. Roddick, whose last win against Haas had come in the 2005 San Jose semifinals, now has a 4-7 head-to-head record against the former World No. 2 tennis player. Roddick lost in the semifinals to Radek Stepanek, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 4-6. It was the first time in five matches between the two players that Roddick had lost.

In the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships, Roddick beat Steve Darcis of Belgium 7-6(1), 6-2 in the first round, and quickly defeated Robby Ginepri 6-2, 6-3 in the second. He defeated Sam Querrey 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 to reach the semifinals. There Roddick defeated Australian Lleyton Hewitt 2-6, 7-6, 6-4, to reach the final. He took his first title of the year by beating Stepanek in the championship match, 7-5, 7-5. He had to recover from being up a break and losing serve in the first set, but broke serve to take the opener. The two remained on serve throughout the second set until Roddick broke to take the match.

Roddick will not defend his Dubai title, with prize money of over $2 million, to protest the UAE's refusal to grant Israeli Shahar Pe'er a visa for the WTA event. "I really didn't agree with what went on over there," Roddick said.

With his 6-2, 6-3, 6-2 win over Paul-Henri Mathieu on April 13, for the deciding victory in the best-of-five 2008 quarterfinal Davis Cup match with France, Roddick improved to 10-0 in clinching situations for the United States. In his second singles victory in three days, he was held to 17 aces, down from 30 against Michaël Llodra a few days prior.

Roddick improved to 29-9 for the US in Davis Cup matches, trailing only John McEnroe (41) and Andre Agassi (30). His win against the 12th-ranked Mathieu was part of a strong month in which he beat the tour's top three players -- Federer, Nadal, and Djokovic.

Roddick is often called "A-Rod," referring to his first initial and the first three letters of his last name, and a reference to baseball superstar Alex Rodriguez who already has that nickname.

Roddick uses the Pure Drive Roddick Plus Cortex Racquet with Babolat Pro Hurricane Tour string (of yellow color), a signature racquet designed for him by racquet sponsor Babolat, which is slightly heavier (11.9 oz), stiffer (Babolat RDC index 72), and longer (27.5") than the standard Pure Drive Series (11.3 oz, Babolat RDC 71, 27"). The racquet is designed for a strong service due to its weight, stiffness, and length. According to Tennis Warehouse, the best one for this fundamental. He strings with a custom hybrid (Pro Hurricane Tour + VS). Roddick's tension varies, but he mostly strings his racquets to a tension of roughly 64 or 65 pounds.

Roddick also uses Babolat Propulse II tennis shoes, which are his signature gear. In matches, Roddick wears shirts, shorts, and caps manufactured for him by Lacoste. He formerly wore Reebok.

Roddick's style is that of an offensive baseliner. Roddick is known for his powerful first serve, usually around 130-150 mph (209~242 km/h), which he uses to earn free points with aces or put himself into position to hit a forehand winner. His first serve is known to some as the "Roddick Serve." since he abbreviates the serve by removing part of the motion. He usually targets the two corners to win aces.

For his second serve, Roddick usually employs a heavy kick serve, then tries to use a variety of spins, slices, and angles in the rally to throw off his opponent and position himself for a winning shot. Despite all this, Roddick is sometimes criticized for his lack of variety.

Roddick will also occasionally use the serve-and-volley tactic on both first and second services to surprise his opponent, though he generally prefers to remain near the baseline after a serve. Lately, under new coach Larry Stefanki, Roddick has been developing his volleying skills.

On April 5, 2002, Roddick guest-starred on the television show Sabrina, the Teenage Witch as himself. In the episode, Sabrina summoned him so he could give her tennis lessons.

Roddick appeared on the The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn talk show in 2002 and 2003, Late Show with David Letterman, Late Night with Conan O'Brien, and Live with Regis and Kathie Lee in 2003, Jimmy Kimmel Live! in 2004 and 2005, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno in 2005 and 2007, and The Ellen DeGeneres Show in 2006. Roddick also appeared on Friday Night with Jonathan Ross on June 8, 2007. The two had humorous conversations about life beyond the court, other players, and on-court fashions. At one point during the interview, Ross sat on Roddick's lap to try to make him feel uncomfortable.

Roddick hosted Saturday Night Live on November 8, 2003, becoming the second tennis player, (the first having been Chris Evert) and the first male tennis player to host (while Chris Evert is the only female tennis player to host SNL).

Roddick also appeared on a 2004 episode of the Anne Robinson Version of The Weakest Link, but ended up being voted off.

Roddick is in a This is SportsCenter ad with Stuart Scott, in which he confronts the Sports Center anchor about him not calling him "A-Rod," and asks him "Did Alex Rodriguez put you up to this?" Scott replies "Who?" Roddick says "A-Rod!" Scott gets a sneaky look on his face, and Roddick leaves disgusted.

The June/July 2007 issue of Men's Fitness magazine carried an article on Roddick. The cover shot featured the tennis ace in a t-shirt, straining to contain massive, pumped-up biceps and hulking shoulder and chest muscles. The image set off widespread online speculation that the magazine had altered Roddick's likeness, a suspicion echoed by Roddick himself. Roddick has quipped that he saw the photo, and that Nadal wanted his arms back.

In 2004, Roddick produced the fastest serve in professional tennis: 249.4 km/h (155 mph) during a Davis Cup semi-final match with Vladimir Voltchkov on hard court in Charleston. Earlier that year, Roddick had the fastest serve in U.S. Open history: 244 km/h (152 mph) against American Scoville Jenkins. Roddick also won the 2004 ESPY Award for Best Male Tennis Player.

That same year he won the Arthur Ashe Humanitarian Award of the Year because of his charity efforts, which included: raising money for the survivors of the tsunami following 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake through Serving for Tsunami Relief and other efforts; auctioning off several rackets and autographs to raise money for UNICEF; and creating the Andy Roddick Foundation to help at-risk youth. The foundation is partly funded through the sale of blue wristbands inscribed "No Compromise," inspired by Lance Armstrong's yellow Livestrong wristbands.

In 2007 Roddick and the Andy Roddick Foundation was awarded by the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health. Roddick was the first male tennis player ever to receive the award.

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only after a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded. Davis Cup matches are included in the statistics. This table is current through the 2008 Madrid Masters, which ends on October 19, 2008.

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Roger Federer

Federer in Cincinnati during the 2005 US Open Series.

Infobox last updated on: February 2, 2009.

Roger Federer (pronounced /ˈrɒdʒə ˈfɛdərər/; born August 8, 1981) is a Swiss professional tennis player who is currently ranked World No. 2. He was the World No. 1 ranked player for a record 237 consecutive weeks, from February 2, 2004 to August 17, 2008. Federer is widely considered to be one of the greatest male singles tennis players of the open era.

Federer has won 13 Grand Slam singles titles (3 Australian Open, 5 Wimbledon, 5 US Open), currently just one shy of all-time leader Pete Sampras. He has also won 4 Tennis Masters Cup titles, and 14 ATP Masters Series titles, as well as winning Olympic gold in doubles. He holds many records in the sport, including having appeared in 10 consecutive Grand Slam men's singles finals (2005 Wimbledon Championships through the 2007 US Open) and 19 consecutive Grand Slam singles semifinals (2004 Wimbledon–present). He also holds the open era records for most consecutive wins on both grass courts (65) and hard courts (56). He has a storied rivalry with Spaniard Rafael Nadal, who recently succeeded him as the World No. 1 player.

As a result of Federer's successes in the sport, he has been named the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year for four consecutive years (2005–08).

Federer was born in Basel, to Swiss-German Robert Federer and South African Lynette Federer (née Durand). He grew up in suburban Münchenstein, ten minutes from Basel and close to the borders of France and Germany. Federer considers Swiss German his first language. He also speaks German, French and English fluently and conducts press conferences in all four. He is Roman Catholic and met Pope Benedict XVI while playing the 2006 Internazionali BNL d'Italia tournament in Rome .

In addition to tennis, he also played football as a boy and considered becoming a professional footballer before deciding to pursue a career in tennis. As a youngster, he enjoyed watching Marcelo Ríos in action. He especially liked Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Marcelo Ríos and has cited them as idols.

Federer is highly involved in various charities. He established the Roger Federer Foundation in 2003 to help disadvantaged people and to promote sports to youth. He was appointed a Goodwill Ambassador of UNICEF from 2006. Since then, he has visited South Africa and Tamil Nadu, one of the worst tsunami-affected areas in India. He has also appeared in UNICEF public messages to raise public awareness of AIDS.

He is currently dating former WTA player Miroslava "Mirka" Vavrinec, who retired from tennis in 2002 after a foot injury. The two met at the 2000 Sydney Olympics where they were both representing Switzerland.

In 2007, Federer was photographed by Annie Leibowitz as King Arthur. This was part of a series of photographs taken by her of many different celebrities for Disney's Year of a Million Dreams project.

Federer started playing tennis at the age of six. He began participating in group lessons at the age of nine and began weekly private coaching when he was ten. He also played football until the age of twelve when he decided to focus solely on tennis. At fourteen, he became the national champion of all groups in Switzerland and was chosen to train at the Swiss National Tennis Center in Ecublens. He joined the ITF junior tennis circuit in July 1996. In 1998, his final year as a junior, Federer won the junior Wimbledon title and the prestigious year-ending Orange Bowl. He was recognized as the ITF World Junior Tennis champion of the year.

In July 1998, Federer joined the ATP tour at Gstaad. The following year he debuted for the Swiss Davis Cup team against Italy and finished the year as the youngest player (for the year) inside ATP's top 100 ranking. In 2000, Federer reached the semifinals at the Sydney Olympics and lost the bronze medal match to Arnaud di Pasquale of France. Federer reached his first final in Marseille which he lost to Marc Rosset and was also the runner-up in Basel. He failed to make an impression at Grand Slams and Masters Series tournaments, and ended the year ranked 29th. (All results and ranking history from ATP).

Federer challenged for the top ranking in men's tennis during 2003, finishing the year at World No. 2 just behind Andy Roddick and just ahead of Juan Carlos Ferrero.

In the first Grand Slam tournament of the year, Federer lost in the fourth round of the Australian Open to David Nalbandian. He then won two hard court tournaments in Marseille and Dubai before being upset in early round matches at the Tennis Masters Series (TMS) tournaments in Indian Wells and Miami.

On clay, Federer won the tournament in Munich, was the runner-up at the TMS tournament in Rome, and lost in the third round of the TMS tournament in Hamburg. Although Federer was seeded fifth at the French Open, he lost to Luis Horna in the first round.

Federer won both of the grass court tournaments he played. He defeated Nicolas Kiefer in the final of the tournament in Halle before winning his first Grand Slam singles title at Wimbledon. He defeated Roddick in the semifinals and Mark Philippoussis in the final and lost only one set during the tournament, to Mardy Fish in the third round.

During the North American summer hard court season, Federer lost to Roddick in the semifinals of the TMS tournament in Montreal and to Nalbandian in the second round of the TMS tournament in Cincinnati. At the US Open, Nalbandian again defeated Federer, this time in the fourth round.

During the autumn, Federer played four consecutive indoor tournaments in Europe. He won the tournament in Vienna but failed to reach the finals of the tournament in Basel and the TMS tournaments in Madrid and Paris.

To end the year, Federer won the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston. As the third-seeded player, he defeated Andre Agassi, Nalbandian, and Ferrero during the round robin phase before beating top-seeded Roddick in the semifinals and Agassi in the final.

Federer had one of the most dominating and successful years in the open era of modern men's tennis. He won three of the four Grand Slam singles tournaments, did not lose a match to anyone ranked in the top ten, won every final he reached, and was named the ITF Tennis World Champion. His win–loss record for the year was 74–6 with 11 titles.

Federer won his first Australian Open singles title by defeating Marat Safin in the final in straight sets. This win helped him succeed Andy Roddick as the World No. 1, a ranking he would hold for four years until August 18, 2008. He successfully defended his Wimbledon singles title by defeating Roddick in the final and won his first US Open singles title by defeating Lleyton Hewitt in the final. Federer was the top-seeded player at the Athens Olympics but lost in the second round to Tomáš Berdych 4–6, 7–5, 7–5. Federer finished the year by taking the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston for the second consecutive year, defeating Hewitt in the final. Federer's only loss at a Grand Slam tournament was at the French Open, where he lost to former World No. 1 and 3-time French Open champion Gustavo Kuerten in straight sets.

Federer did not have a coach during 2004, relying instead on his fitness trainer Pierre Paganini, physiotherapist Pavel Kovac, and a management team composed of his parents, his girlfriend and manager Mirka Vavrinec, and a few friends.

To begin the year, Federer hired former Australian tennis player Tony Roche to coach him on a limited basis. He then reached the Australian Open semifinals before falling to eventual winner Marat Safin in a five-set night match that lasted more than four hours, 5–7, 6–4, 5–7, 7–6(6), 9–7. He rebounded to win the year's first two ATP Masters Series (AMS) titles: Indian Wells (by defeating Lleyton Hewitt of Australia in straight sets) and Miami (by defeating Rafael Nadal of Spain in five sets after being down two sets to love). He won his third Hamburg clay court title in May by defeating Richard Gasquet, to whom he had earlier lost in Monte Carlo. He then entered the French Open as one of the favorites, but lost in the semifinals in four sets to eventual winner Nadal.

Federer won three of the four Grand Slam singles tournaments and ended the year ranked number one, with his points ranking several thousand points greater than that of his nearest competitor, Rafael Nadal. Federer won the year's first Grand Slam tournament, the Australian Open, by defeating Cypriot Marcos Baghdatis. In March, Federer successfully defended his titles at the Indian Wells and Miami Masters, and became the first player ever to win the Indian Wells-Miami double in consecutive years. Federer then started the clay-court season by reaching the final of the ATP Masters Series (AMS) event at Monte Carlo losing in four sets to Rafael Nadal. He then reached a consecutive AMS final, along with Nadal, at the Rome Masters where it seemed as though Federer would finally defeat his rival on clay; however, Nadal won the epic five-set match, which lasted five hours, in the decisive tiebreak after saving two match points. Federer chose not to defend his title at the Hamburg Masters, where he had won in the previous two years. At the French Open, Federer lost in the final to defending champion Nadal in four sets. Had he won the French Open, he would have completed a career Grand Slam and become the first man since Rod Laver to hold all four Grand Slam singles titles at the same time. Although the clay Grand Slam title eluded him, he became one of only two then-active players who had reached the finals of all four Grand Slam singles tournaments, the other being Andre Agassi.

Federer won his third Australian Open and tenth Grand Slam singles title when he, as defending champion, won the tournament without dropping a set, defeating Fernando González of Chile in the final. He was the first man since Björn Borg in 1980 to win a Grand Slam singles tournament without losing a set. His winning streak of 41 consecutive matches ended when he lost to Guillermo Cañas in the second round of the Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells, California, after winning this tournament three consecutive years. At the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami, Florida, Federer again lost to Cañas, this time in the fourth round in three sets. He was awarded four ATP Awards during a ceremony at the tournament, making him the first player to receive four awards during the same year.

Federer started his clay-court season by reaching his second consecutive final of the Monte Carlo Masters. As in 2006, he lost to second seeded Rafael Nadal. Federer lost in the third round of the Internazionali d'Italia in Rome to Filippo Volandri. This defeat meant he had gone four tournaments without a title, his longest stretch since becoming World No. 1. On May 20, 2007, however, Federer defeated Nadal on clay for the first time, winning the Hamburg Masters tournament, and ending Nadal's record of 81 consecutive match wins on clay. At the French Open, Federer reached the final for the second consecutive year but lost to Nadal for the third consecutive time. The day after the final, Federer announced that he was withdrawing from the Gerry Weber Open in Halle, which he had won the last four years. He cited fatigue and fear of getting an injury. He therefore entered Wimbledon for the first time without having played a warm-up grass-court tournament. Despite this, Federer once again defeated Nadal in the final, however Nadal was able to push Federer into a fifth set, with his last five-set match at Wimbledon coming from 2001 where he beat Pete Sampras. With the win over Nadal, Federer tied Björn Borg's record of five Wimbledons in a row.

Federer won the Cincinnati Masters title for the second time, beating James Blake in the final, to collect his 50th career singles title, his 14th ATP Masters Series title, and the 2007 US Open Series points race.

In the US Open final, Federer beat third seed Novak Djokovic. It was Federer's 12th Grand Slam title, tying Roy Emerson. As champion of the US Open Series points race, Federer received a bonus of $1 million, in addition to the $1.4 million prize for winning the US Open singles title.

Federer entered the year-ending Tennis Masters Cup where he lost his first round robin match to the 2007 Australian Open runner-up, Fernando González, 3–6 7–6(1) 7–5 . This marked the first time a player had defeated Federer in the round robin of the Tennis Masters Cup and González's first win against Federer. Federer went on to defeat Rafael Nadal 6–4, 6–1 in the semifinals and David Ferrer in the finals 6–2, 6–3, 6–2.

Federer began the year by attempting to defend his title at the Australian Open. He lost, however, in the semifinals to eventual champion Novak Djokovic 7–5, 6–3, 7–6(5). This ended his male record of ten consecutive Grand Slam finals. It was the first time that Federer had lost in straight sets in a Grand Slam singles match since he lost in the third round of the 2004 French Open. His last straight-sets loss at a hard court Grand Slam tournament was during the fourth round of the 2002 US Open.

In March, Federer revealed that he had recently been diagnosed with mononucleosis and that he may have suffered from it as early as December 2007. Federer also had an illness related to food poisoning prior to the start of the Australian Open. He noted, however, that he was now "medically cleared to compete".

Although Federer was seeded first and was the defending champion at the Dubai Tennis Championships, he lost to Andy Murray in the first round with a score of 6–7(6), 6–3, 6–4. On March 10, Federer won his third exhibition match out of four against former World No. 1 and fourteen-time Grand Slam singles titlist Pete Sampras at Madison Square Garden in New York City 6–3, 6–7, 7–6.

At the Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells, California, the first Tennis Masters Series event of the year, Federer lost in the semifinals to American Mardy Fish for the first time, thus ending his 41-match winning streak against American players dating back to August 2003. Federer's next tournament was the Masters Series Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Florida, where he lost in the quarterfinals to American Andy Roddick. Roddick's last official win against him was in 2003.

Federer began the clay court season at the Estoril Open in Portugal, which was his first optional clay-court tournament since Gstaad in 2004 and his first tournament with coach José Higueras. Federer won his first tournament of the year when Nikolay Davydenko retired from the final while trailing 7–6, 1–2 with a leg ligament strain.

Federer then played three Masters Series tournaments on clay. At the Masters Series Monte Carlo, Federer lost to three-time defending champion Rafael Nadal in the final in straight sets. Federer made 44 unforced errors, lost a 4–0 lead in the second set, and fell to 1–7 against Nadal on clay courts. At the Internazionali d'Italia in Rome, Federer lost in the quarterfinals to Radek Štěpánek 7–6(4), 7–6(7). Federer was the defending champion at the Masters Series Hamburg and won his first four matches in straight sets to set up a repeat of the previous year's final against Nadal. In the first set of the final, Federer built a 5–1 lead and served for the set twice. Nadal, however, won six consecutive games to win the set 7–5. Nadal again broke Federer's serve in the opening game of the second set, but Federer broke back and won the set 7–6(3). Nadal then won the third set 6–3 and the tournament.

At the French Open, Federer was defeated quickly by Nadal in the final 6–1, 6–3, 6–0. The last time Federer had lost a set 6–0 was his first round match in 1999 against Byron Black at the Artois Championships played at Queen's Club in London. This was also the fourth consecutive year that Federer and Nadal had played at the French Open, with Federer losing his third consecutive final to Nadal as well as their semifinal match in 2005. Federer's record of 23-4 (2005-08) at the French Open is second only to Nadal's record of 28-0 during the same period.

Federer bounced back by winning the Gerry Weber Open in Halle, Germany without dropping a set or a service game. This was the fifth time he had won this event. With this result, he tied Pete Sampras's record for most titles on grass in the open era with ten.

At Wimbledon, Federer reached his 17th consecutive Grand Slam singles semifinal and his 16th Grand Slam final, tying Björn Borg for fourth most in male tennis history. He once again played World No. 2 Nadal in the final. A victory for Federer would mean his sixth consecutive Wimbledon singles title, breaking Borg's modern era record and equaling the all-time record held since 1886 by William Renshaw. Federer saved two championship points in the fourth set tiebreak but eventually lost the match 6–4, 6–4, 6–7(5), 6–7(8), 9–7. The rain-delayed match ended in near darkness after 4 hours, 48 minutes of play, making it the longest (in terms of elapsed time) men's final in Wimbledon recorded history, and 7 hours, 15 minutes after its scheduled start. The defeat also ended Federer's 65 match winning streak on grass. John McEnroe described the match as "The greatest match I've ever seen." After Nadal surpassed him as World No. 1 later in the year, Federer stated that his main goal would be to regain the Wimbledon title rather than the top spot.

Federer made early exits in his next two singles tournaments. At the Masters Series Rogers Cup in Toronto, Canada, Federer lost in the second round to Gilles Simon after receiving a first round bye. At the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters in Cincinnati, Ohio, Federer was the defending champion but lost in the third round to Ivo Karlović for the first time in seven matches between them.

Federer was chosen to carry the national flag at the Beijing Olympics. At the Summer Olympics in Beijing, Federer lost in the quarterfinals to James Blake for the first time in their nine matches. Federer however, finally won his first Olympic gold medal in the men's doubles when he and compatriot Stanislas Wawrinka upset the World No. 1 doubles team of Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan of the United States in the semifinals and defeated Sweden's Simon Aspelin and Thomas Johansson in the final, 6–3, 6–4, 6–7(4), 6–3. The following day, Federer lost his World No. 1 ranking to Nadal after a record 237 consecutive weeks.

At the US Open, Federer reached the fourth round without dropping a set. There, he defeated Russian Igor Andreev 6–7(5), 7–6(5), 6–3, 3–6, 6–3. In the quarterfinals, he defeated Gilles Müller in straight sets and then, in a rematch of the 2007 US Open final, he topped third-seeded Novak Djokovic in the semifinals 6–3, 5–7, 7–5, 6–2. On a Monday final, he defeated Andy Murray 6–2, 7–5, 6–2 to win his 13th Grand Slam title and his fifth straight US Open title and extended his US Open winning streak to 34 matches. Federer became the first player in tennis history to have five consecutive wins at both Wimbledon and the US Open.

At the 2008 Madrid Masters, Federer reached the semifinals without losing a set. His run ended when he lost to Murray, 3–6, 6–3, 7–5. Meanwhile, he became the all-time leader in career prize money in men's tennis, earning over US$43.3 million at the end of the tournament and surpassing former World No. 1 and 14-time Grand Slam champion, Pete Sampras.

Federer won his 57th career title at the Davidoff Swiss Indoors in Basel, beating David Nalbandian in the final, 6–3, 6–4. He became the only player to win the title three consecutive years. He reached the quarterfinals of his next event, the BNP Paribas Masters in Paris before withdrawing because of back pain. This was the first time in Federer's career of 763 matches that he had withdrawn from a tournament. This meant that 2008 was his first since 2003 in which he did not win a Masters Series title.

Federer entered the Tennis Masters Cup as the top-seeded player after Nadal withdrew from the tournament. He drew Gilles Simon, Andy Murray, and Andy Roddick in the Red Group. In his opening match, Federer lost to Simon 4–6, 6–4, 6–3. Simon became just the second man to defeat Federer in the round robin stage of the Tennis Masters Cup. Federer kept his hopes alive by defeating Roddick's replacement, Radek Stepanek, 7–6(4), 6–4. In his third match, he faced Murray in a repeat of the US Open final and Madrid semifinal. Murray went on to win the match 4–6, 7–6(3), 7–5, although Federer came back from trailing 5–2 in the second set and 3–0 in the third set. Federer had also received medical treatment for back and hip problems in the third set and lost after saving seven match points. This was the first time that Federer had not advanced to the semifinal stage of the event. However, Federer still ended the year ranked World No. 2.

In preparation for the Australian Open, Federer played two exhibition tournaments and one official tournament. He lost to Andy Murray in the semifinals of the Capitala World Tennis exhibition in Abu Dhabi. He then lost in the semifinals of the ATP World Tour 250 series tournament in Doha, Qatar to Murray 6–7(6), 6–2, 6–2. Federer won the AAMI Classic exhibition in Melbourne when he defeated Stanislas Wawrinka in the final 6–1, 6–3.

Federer defeated each of his first three opponents in straight sets at the Australian Open, including former World No. 1 Marat Safin in the third round 6–3, 6–2, 7–6. In the fourth round, Federer rallied from two sets down to defeat Tomas Berdych 4–6, 6–7(5), 6–4, 6–4, 6–2. Federer reached his record 19th consecutive Grand Slam semifinal by defeating eighth seeded Juan Martin del Potro in the quarterfinals 6–3, 6–0, 6–0 in only 80 minutes. Federer then defeated another former World No. 1, Andy Roddick, 6–2, 7–5, 7–5 to advance to his 18th Grand Slam final (one behind the all time record set by Ivan Lendl). In the final, Federer was defeated by long-time rival Rafael Nadal in their first meeting on a hard court in a Grand Slam tournament. The match lasted over four hours with Nadal victorious in five sets. Federer broke down in tears during the trophy presentation and struggled to make his runner-up speech. Federer blamed the defeat on a lack of rhythm in his first serve.

Federer then withdrew from the Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships and from Switzerland's Davis Cup tie against the U.S. because of a back injury he sustained in late 2008. He stated that this is "a precautionary measure" to make sure his back is "fully rehabilitated ... for the rest of the 2009 season".

The main reason why Nadal poses difficulty for Federer is because of Nadal's forehand. Nadal plays left-handed and his cross-court forehand shot is always towards Federer's backhand - this is a high percentage play. Because of the amount of topspin that Nadal puts on his forehands, single-backhanders have more difficulty returning the ball compared to double-handers and while Federer's forehand also goes to the Nadal's backhand, Federer is not able to break the backhand of Nadal. For this reason, in many of their matches, the same rally occurs in a majority of the points. Nadal continually attacks Federer's single backhand until an unforced error is made. This is most notable in the 2007 and 2008 French Open finals. The same tactic was employed in the 2007 and 2008 Wimbledon finals to great effect.

Federer has a versatile, all-court playing style and can hit all of the fundamental shots with a high degree of proficiency. His versatility was epitomised when Jimmy Connors said "In an era of specialists - you're either a clay court specialist, a grass court specialist or a hard court specialist... or you're Roger Federer". He is an adept volleyer and an excellent baseliner who can dictate play with precise groundstrokes from both wings. While there seems to be no definite answer regarding which forehand grip he uses, most agree the grip is between eastern and slightly semi-western. This grip is usually referred to as a "hybrid grip" or "extreme eastern". He can generate extreme top-spin with the forehand, allowing him to open up cross-court angles while still hitting the ball with pace. He keeps his eyes locked on the contact point longer than most players and keeps his head fairly still despite his speed of swing. David Foster Wallace described the exceptional speed, fluidity and brute force of this forehand motion as "a great liquid whip", while John McEnroe has referred to it as "the greatest shot in our sport" on numerous occasions. Federer plays with a one-handed backhand, and has an excellent slice, and can also fire top-spin winning shots. Federer tends to hit his groundstrokes early, while the ball is still on the rise, much like Andre Agassi did. While this requires excellent reactions and footwork, it means that Federer hits his groundstrokes closer to the net than most of his opponents. This reduces the reaction time of his opponents and allows him to hit the angled winners that are a trademark of his game.

His serve is difficult to read because he tosses the ball in the same spot no matter where he intends to serve it and he turns his back to his opponents during his motion. His first serve is typically around 190 km/h (However, he is capable of serving at 220 km/h). His second serve usually has a heavily kicked delivery. Federer generally serves with placement and precision, but on occasion he will hit a powerful serve to keep his opponents off balance. His footwork, balance, and court coverage are exceptional and he is considered to be one of the fastest movers in the game. Unlike most players who take many small steps when approaching the ball, like Jimmy Connors, Federer takes long fluid strides. He can hit a strong shot on the run or while backpedaling, allowing him to switch from defense to offense. Federer's relaxed, smooth playing style belies his aggressive and opportunistic tactics, as he constructs points which allow him to hit winners with his powerful groundstrokes. Federer is capable of performing in high pressure situations, often saving break, set or even match points during a match.

Federer currently plays with a customized Wilson Six-One Tour Racquet, which is characterised by its smaller hitting surface (customized) (90 square inch), heavy weight (customized)(12.7 oz strung weight), and thin beam (18 mm). Federer strings his racquets at a 53–60 pounds tension (depending on his opponent and surface), although at Wimbledon 2008 he was stringing at around 48 pounds with natural gut main strings (Wilson Natural Gut 16 String) and polyester cross strings (Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power Rough 16L String). Federer also uses string savers to extend the life of the natural gut strings. Federer endorses Wilson tennis racquets and accessories and Nike footwear and apparel (he wears the Nike Air Vapor V and Nike Sphere Pinstripe Polo shirts). For the 2006 championships at Wimbledon, Nike designed a jacket emblazoned with a crest of three tennis racquets symbolizing the three Wimbledon Championships he had previously won. This jacket was updated in preparation for the 2007 Wimbledon Championships, with four racquets. In Wimbledon 2008, Nike even made him a personalized cardigan which exuded stylishness and had the mark of the supreme champion. He now has his own logo, an R and F joined together. He also has endorsement deals from various other companies, many of them being Swiss. He also endorses Gillette and Jura, a Swiss based company.In addition, he has had a long standing endorsement deal with Mercedes Benz.

In October 2003, he launched a fragrance called RF Cosmetics.

With 57 career singles titles, Federer is tied for eighth on the open era career singles titles list. Time Magazine named Federer as one of the 100 most influential people in 2007.

Roger Federer holds a number of records in tennis history, the most prominent of which is that he has won the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open in the same year three times: 2004, 2006, and 2007.

Federer has won numerous awards during his tennis career.

Federer was named Laureus World Sportsman of the Year in 2005. He also won this award in 2006 through 2008.

To help interpret the performance table, the legend below explains what each abbreviation and color coded box represents in the performance timeline.

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only once a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded. This table is current through the Australian Open in Melbourne,, which ended on February 1, 2009.

NMS - neither an ATP Masters Series 1000 event nor an ATP Masters Series event.

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Marat Safin

Safin practicing at the 2007 US Open

Infobox last updated on: February 12, 2009.

Marat Mikhailovich Safin (Tatar: Марат Мөбин улы Сафин, Marat Möbin ulı Safin; Russian: Мара́т Миха́йлович (Муби́нович) Са́фин /mɑ.ˈrɑt.ˈsɑ.fɪn/; born January 27, 1980) is a Russian former World No. 1 tennis player. He is the older brother of WTA player Dinara Safina.

Safin began his professional career in 1997 and held the No. 1 world ranking for a total of 9 weeks between November 2000 and April 2001. He achieved his first Grand Slam title at the 2000 U.S. Open after defeating Pete Sampras, and won the 2005 Australian Open, defeating Lleyton Hewitt. Safin helped lead Russia to Davis Cup victories in 2002 and 2006. Despite his dislike of grass courts, he became the first Russian man to reach the semi finals of Wimbledon at the 2008 Wimbledon Championships. Marat Safin is currently ranked no. 25 in the official world men's tennis rankings. Safin has said that he will most likely retire from professional tennis after the 2009 season.

Marat Safin was born in Moscow, USSR (now Russia), to Mikhail Safin and Rauza Islanova, an ethnic Tatar family, Safin describes himself as a non-practising Muslim. He speaks Russian, English and Spanish. His parents were former tennis players and coaches. His younger sister, Dinara Safina, is a professional tennis player and silver medalist at the 2008 Olympic games in Beijing. Safin's father managed the local Spartak Tennis Club where Safin trained in his youth alongside several tennis players, including Anna Kournikova, Elena Dementieva, and Anastasia Myskina.

At age fourteen he moved to Valencia, Spain, to gain access to advanced tennis training programs which were not available in Russia. Safin says he grew up "very fast...with no muscles" and that he moved to Spain because clay courts were "better for the knees". Safin speaks fluent Spanish as a result.

Safin started his professional career in 1997. In 1998, Safin consecutively defeated Andre Agassi and defending champion Gustavo Kuerten at the French Open.

Safin held the No. 1 ATP ranking for 9 weeks during 2000 when he won his first Grand Slam tournament at the US Open, by defeating Pete Sampras in straight sets. However, a succession of injuries hindered his progress and Safin missed the majority of the season in 2003 as a result.

His best result at Wimbledon is reaching the semifinals in 2008 often losing in the first or second rounds in other years; he was defeated by Roger Federer in 2008, 6-3 7-6(4) 6-4.

Safin has won five ATP Tennis Masters Series titles during his career. His first was in 2000 when he won the title in Toronto, Canada. He holds a record-tying three (2000, 2002, and 2004) wins in Paris, France, and one in 2004 in Madrid, Spain.

In 2004, Safin reached the Semifinal of the Tennis Masters' Cup in Houston, where he was defeated by Roger Federer, 6–3, 7–6(18). The second-set tiebreak (20-18) was the third longest tiebreak in the Open Era. Safin also reached the semifinals in 2000.

Marat Safin helped Russia achieve its first Davis Cup victory in 2002, with a 3–2 tie-breaking win against France in the final round at the Palais Omnisports Paris Bercy. His Russian team included Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Mikhail Youzhny, Andrei Stoliarov, and team captain Shamil Tarpischev. The team made Davis Cup history by being the second to win the event after losing the doubles tie-breaker, and becoming the first team to win a (live-televised) five-set finals match by coming back from a two-set deficit. Safin also helped Russia to win the Davis Cup in 2006. After a straight sets defeat by David Nalbandian in his first match, his doubles victory (partnering Dmitry Tursunov) against Nalbandian and Agustín Calleri and singles victory against José Acasuso drove Russia to victory.

After winning the 2005 Australian Open, Safin attributed his recent revival and more consistent performance to the calming presence of his new coach Peter Lundgren, saying that "I never believed in myself before at all, until I started to work with him." Lundgren had been Federer's coach, until parting ways at the end of 2003; Safin hired Lundgren the following year. He was later defeated in the early rounds of each of the seven tournaments he played between the Australian Open and the French Open. In June 2005, shortly after his unsuccessful French Open campaign, Safin made a surprise finals appearance at the Wimbledon tune-up tournament in Halle on grass. He lost the final narrowly to the defending champion, Roger Federer.

Although a serious knee-injury hampered Safin's progression and rankings within the ATP (he missed the 2005 US Open and 2006 Australian Open), Safin made appearances at the 2006 ATP Masters tournaments at Indian Wells, Miami, Monte Carlo, Rome and Hamburg.

On August 17, 2006, after a disappointing year during which Safin suffered injuries and his ranking plummeted to as low as 104, Safin temporarily parted ways with coach Peter Lundgren.

At the 2006 US Open, Safin defeated David Nalbandian, who was then World #4, in the 2nd Round in a 5th Set tiebreaker, but lost at the 4th Round to former world #2 Tommy Haas, also on a 5th set tiebreaker.

Safin helped Russia beat the USA 3–2 to gain a place in the finals in December 2006, and secondly with a good run at the start of the indoor season the Thailand Open where he was narrowly edged out by #7 seed, James Blake.

On October 14, 2006, Safin made it to his first final in a year-and-a-half at the Kremlin Cup in Moscow, the first all Russian final at that event, losing to Nikolay Davydenko.

On December 3, 2006, Safin defeated José Acasuso 6–3, 3–6, 6–3, 7–6 (5) in the 5th rubber of the 2006 Davis Cup, winning the cup for Russia. He had previously lost 6–4, 6–4, 6–4 to David Nalbandian in his first match. In the doubles match, he teamed with Dmitri Tursunov to win against Nalbandian and Agustín Calleri in straight sets.

Safin played no warm-up tournaments in the run up to the Australian Open. As Safin was forced to miss the tournament in 2006 due to injury, 2007 was his first Australian Open since he captured the title in 2005. Safin lost against sixth seed Andy Roddick in the third round match by 6–7, 6–2, 4–6, 6–7 in a grueling 3-hour match. Roddick commented after the match, "With Marat you know you are going to get an emotional roller-coaster. You just have to try and focus on yourself and I was able to do that tonight.

In April, Marat won the deciding quarter-final Davis Cup rubber against France, beating Paul-Henri Mathieu in straight sets.

Safin reached the third round at Wimbledon, before falling to the defending champion Roger Federer. In July, Safin announced that he and his coach Alexander Volkov were parting and that his new coach would be former pro Hernán Gumy.

Safin won the doubles title at the Kremlin Cup in Moscow in October, his first ATP-level title since the 2005 Australian Open.

Safin prepared for the Australian Open at the invitational exhibition tournament, the AAMI Kooyong Classic in Melbourne. Other players in the field were Roddick, Fernando González, Nikolay Davydenko, Marcos Baghdatis, Ivan Ljubičić and Andy Murray. Safin was victorious in his opening match, defeating Andy Murray 6–1, 6–4 before falling to defeat in his second match to Andy Roddick 6–3, 6–3. In the 3rd place play-off, Safin rebounded from the Roddick loss and overpowered last year's Australian Open runner up Fernando González winning the match 6–3, 6–3. Safin won his first round match at the Australian Open against Ernests Gulbis in straight sets - 6-0, 6-4, 7-6(2). He was ousted in the 2nd round after a grueling five set match against Baghdatis - 6–4, 6–4 2–6, 3–6, 6–2.

In February, Safin was granted wildcards into the tournaments at Memphis and Las Vegas. In Memphis, he was edged out by his 2002 Australian Open opponent, Thomas Johansson, 7–6, 7–6 in the first round. In Las Vegas he was defeated by Lleyton Hewitt during the semi-finals round in 2007 7–5, 6–1. Safin was defeated by Hewitt once again by 6–2, 6–1 in 58 minutes.

In March, Safin lost in the first round of Indian Wells and Miami, to Jürgen Melzer and qualifier Bobby Reynolds respectively. In the Davis Cup between Russia and the Czech Republic, Safin defeated world no. 9 Tomáš Berdych in a five set encounter, after being two sets down, 6–7, 4–6, 6–3, 6–2, 6–4. This was the first time in his career that he has come back to win a match after being down two sets. Safin said that he hoped that this would be a turnaround in his form.

Safin's next tournament was in Valencia. He defeated former World No. 1 and number 4 seed Juan Carlos Ferrero 6–3, 5–7, 6–4. He played Dutch teenager Robin Haase in the next round. He won the first set 6–2 and was up 4–2 in the 2nd set. However, Haase broke back to take it to a tiebreak. Safin had 4 match points, including one on his serve, but lost this tiebreak, and eventually the match.

In the Monte Carlo Masters, Safin defeated Xavier Malisse 6–3, 6–2, but then lost to No. 5 David Ferrer 6–2, 6–3. He then entered the 2008 BMW Open in Munich, Germany, where his first round opponent was Carlos Berlocq. Safin won 6–3, 3–6, 6–4. In the second round he edged out Michael Berrer 7–6(4), 6–7(5), 6–3, but lost to Fernando González 7-5, 6-3 in his first quarterfinal of the year, and the first since June 2007 at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic in Washington, D.C.

Safin also entered the 2008 French Open but was eliminated in the second round by countryman and No. 4 seed Nikolay Davydenko, in straight sets, 7–6, 6–2, 6–2.

Ranked at No. 75, Safin entered the 2008 Wimbledon Championships where he defeated Fabio Fognini 6–1, 6–2, 7–6(3) in the first round. In the second round he defeated No. 3 player and 2008 Australian Open Champion Novak Djokovic 6–4, 7–6(3), 6–2. Safin's victory came as a shock as Djokovic was described as a "serious contender" to win the tournament. In the third round, he played Italian Andreas Seppi (29th seed) and beat him 7–6, 3–6, 7–6, 6–4. In the Round of 16 came Stanislas Wawrinka who he defeated 6–4, 6–3, 5–7, 6–1. This was the first time he had reached the Quarterfinals in a major tournament since the 2005 Australian Open. Safin went on to defeat Feliciano López 3–6, 7–5, 7–6(1), 6–3 in the quarterfinals to set up a semifinal clash with defending champion Roger Federer. Safin lost the match 6–3, 7–6(3), 6–4. His run to the semifinals was his best record in Wimbledon and made him the first Russian man to ever reach a Wimbledon semifinal. Safin then played at the Swedish Open, on clay, in Båstad against Marc López, winning 7–6, 7–5 in the first round. He lost his second round match against Potito Starace.

Safin was awarded a wild card into the Rogers Cup Masters tournament in Toronto. He played Sam Querrey in the first round, winning 6–3, 6–3. Due to rain delays, he had to play his next match against Swiss Stanislas Wawrinka on the same day. He lost that match 6–3, 6–4. Safin was seeded fifth for his next tournament, the Countrywide Classic in Los Angeles. He defeated Americans John Isner 6–3, 6–4 and Wayne Odesnik 6–3, 6–2 in the first and second rounds respectively to advance to the quarterfinals, where he was defeated by Denis Gremelmayr 3–6, 6–3, 6–2.

In the US Open, Marat Safin lost in the second round to Tommy Robredo 4–6, 7–6, 6–4, 6–0.

At the Moscow Kremlin Cup, he defeated Noam Okun, Julien Benneteau, and fellow countrymen Nikolay Davydenko and Mischa Zverev only to lose to another compatriot Igor Kunitsyn 7–6, 6–7, 6–3 in the final. It was Safin's first final appearance since 2006, in the same event. Following the Kremlin Cup, Safin withdrew from the Madrid Masters event with a shoulder injury cited as the reason.

His next event was the St. Petersburg Open at which he lost in the 2nd round. He then lost his first round match at the final ATP tournament of the calendar - the Paris Masters. He lost the match to Juan Mónaco 6-0 7-6. In the post-match conference, he raised the possibility of his retirement from the sport. Via a message posted on his official website, he said he was going to take a holiday and then seriously consider his options regarding his future in tennis. He finished the year 2008 ranked at #29.

Safin started the 2009 season by playing in the Hopman Cup event in Perth with his sister, Dinara Safina. He arrived at the event sporting a bandaged right thumb, two black eyes, a blood-filled left eye and a cut near his right eye, all suffered in a fight several weeks earlier in Moscow. Safin also announced after an event match that 2009 will be his last season on tour. .

In the 2009 Hopman Cup, teaming with sister, Dinara, the pair played off in the Final representing Russia, but each was defeated in the singles rubbers. Safin withdrew from the Kooyong Classic tournament due to a shoulder injury, but recovered to play his first round Australian Open match, which he won in straight sets over Ivan Navarro of Spain. In the second round, Safin defeated another Spanish player, Guillermo Garcia-Lopez. In the third round he came up against Roger Federer and lost in straight sets. His next tournament is the Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships in Dubai. He exited in the 1st round to Richard Gasquet but still plays in doubles with David Ferrer.

Safin is known for his emotional outbursts during matches, and has smashed numerous rackets. Safin is estimated to have smashed 48 racquets in 1999. As of 2005, Safin estimated that he has broken about 300.

Lack of consistency has been described as Safin's ultimate weakness, since 2005. Safin considers grass to be his least favorite playing surface, even though other opponents with similar playing styles generally dominate on it. Safin had his best performance at Wimbledon in 2008, where he reached the semi finals. Safin dismissed his performance in the 2001 tournament, in which he reached the quarter finals, as a result of luck. Safin says that "It's difficult to . It's difficult to play off the baseline because a lot of bad bounces.". With Safin's semi final performance at Wimbledon in 2008, he became the fourth of five active players to reach the semifinals in all four grand slams joining Roger Federer, David Nalbandian, Novak Djokovic, and later, Rafael Nadal.

Marat Safin has used the Head Prestige classic 600 since in 97' and has a paintjob of the Microgel Prestige for marketing purposes.

His racquets used to be strung using Babolat VS Natural Team Gut 17L gauge. He now uses a 'hybrid' of Babolat VS Team Gut 17L (crosses) and Luxilon ALU-Power Rough 16L (mains) strung at about 62 lbs and 64 lbs respectively. His clothing and shoe sponsor has been adidas for the last 10 years.

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only after a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded. Davis Cup matches are included in the statistics. This table is current through the 2009 Australian Open.

A = did not participate in the tournament.

SR = the ratio of the number of singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played.

1The win and loss totals do not include walkovers.

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Source : Wikipedia