North Carolina

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Posted by pompos 02/25/2009 @ 13:28

Tags : north carolina, states, us

News headlines
Water heater installation eyed in NC plant blast - The Associated Press
RALEIGH, NC (AP) — A contractor clearing a natural gas line during water heater installation likely released a flammable cloud that ignited in a fatal blast at a North Carolina Slim Jim factory, federal investigators said Thursday....
Tennessee, NC State to open 2012 season - ESPN
Tennessee and North Carolina State will meet to open the 2012 season in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game in Atlanta. The Sept. 1 game from the Georgia Dome will be carried nationally by ESPN. "This match-up will continue the tradition of creating the...
Amazon.com warns NC over sales-tax proposal - Bizjournals.com
Amazon.com Inc. has fired a warning shot at North Carolina over a sales-tax bill under consideration in the NC General Assembly. The online retail giant says it will end its relationship with affiliates in the Tar Heel State if the NC legislature...
Heels, Sun Devils meet in elimination game - ESPN
North Carolina and Arizona State meet for the second time in this year's College World Series (ESPN2HD/ESPN360, 7 pm ET). The winner will live to play another day, while the loser goes home. • Over the past four years, the Tar Heels have been dominant...
NC law extends COBRA enrollment - Bizjournals.com
A new NC law gives laid-off employees of small businesses more time to enroll in North Carolina's version of the federal COBRA coverage. It extends the enrollment period to 120 days from 60 days. The coverage, often called “mini-COBRA,” will ultimately...
Hospitalized NC Babies Treated For Possible Swine Flu E... - MyStateline.com
(Greensboro, NC) -- Thirty-three premature babies may have been inadvertently exposed to swine flu at a North Carolina hospital this week. Officials with The Women's Hospital Of Greensboro say a respiratory therapist treated a patient who has since...
North Carolina eliminates Southern Miss, 11-4 - ESPN
Southern Miss coach Corky Palmer and his Golden Eagles were eliminated from the College World Series on Tuesday in a 11-4 loss to North Carolina, sending the legendary leader into retirement. Southern Miss got off to a good start in the top of the...
Barrel art nets arrest, notoriety for NC student - The Associated Press
RALEIGH, NC (AP) — When Joseph Carnevale chopped up three stolen orange and white traffic barrels from a construction site to create a massive sculpture of a roadside monster thumbing a ride, the North Carolina college student said he saw it as a form...
Texas, UNC advance behind big bats - MLB.com
By Bailey Stephens / MLB.com Offensive outbursts ruled the fourth day of action at the College World Series as North Carolina and Texas used big bats to pick up wins. In the early game, led by No. 2 overall pick Dustin Ackley, North Carolina's potent...
NC House panel considers medical marijuana bill - WRAL.com
RALEIGH, NC — People who smoke marijuana for medical purposes in North Carolina told House members it relieves their chronic pain, but a bill legalizing its use isn't likely to pass. The proposal considered Thursday by the House Health Committee would...

Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Official seal of Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Winston-Salem is a city in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Winston-Salem is also the county seat and largest city of Forsyth County and the fourth-largest city in the state. Winston-Salem is a prominent municipality in the Piedmont Triad region and is home to some of the tallest office buildings in the region, the Wachovia Center (Winston-Salem). It is often referred to as the "Twin City" for its dual heritage, although "Camel City" is another popular nickname, referring to the city's prominent tobacco industry (after Camel cigarettes). Many locals, however, use the shortened name "Winston" in informal speech. Winston-Salem is home to two universities; Wake Forest University, a nationally distinguished private university and Winston-Salem State University, an HBCU founded in 1892.

The Old Salem district and related Historic Bethabara site are the city's oldest historical attractions. Also of historical interest is Reynolda Village (which includes Reynolda Gardens and the Reynolda House Museum of American Art). Other sites of interest include the Horne Creek Historic Farm, Tanglewood Park golf course, the SciWorks educational facility, and SECCA, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art. The city's major sports and entertainment venues are organized in a group known as the Winston-Salem Entertainment-Sports Complex.

The Winston-Salem metropolitan area (MSA) has an estimated population of 490,159 according to the 2004 estimate by the U.S. Census Bureau. As of 2007, the combined statistical area (CSA) of Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point, the Piedmont Triad, has a population of 1,786,976, making it the 19th-largest metropolitan area in the USA.

The origin of the town of Salem dates back to January 1753, when Bishop August Gottlieb Spangenberg, on behalf of the Moravian Church, selected a settlement site in the three forks of Muddy Creek. He called this area "die Wachau" (Latin form: Wachovia) named after the Austrian estate of Count Nicolaus Ludwig Zinzendorf. Wachovia Bank takes its name from this area where it was founded. The land, just short of 99,000 acres (400 km²), was subsequently purchased from John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville.

On November 17, 1753, the first settlers arrived at what would later become the town of Bethabara. This town, despite its rapid growth, was not designed to be the primary settlement on the tract. Instead, lots were drawn to select among suitable sites for the location of a new town.

The town established on the chosen site was given the name of Salem (from the Hebrew word Shalom for "peace") chosen for it by the Moravians' late patron, Count Zinzendorf. On 6 January, 1766, the first tree was felled for the building of Salem. Salem was a typical Moravian settlement congregation with the public buildings of the congregation grouped around a central square, today Salem Square. These included the church, a Brethren's House and a Sisters' House for the unmarried members of the Congregation, which owned all the property in town. For many years only members of the Moravian Church were permitted to live in the settlement. This practice had ended by the American Civil War. Many of the original buildings in the settlement have been restored or rebuilt and are now part of Old Salem. Salem Square and "God's Acre", the Moravian Graveyard, are the site each Easter morning of the world-famous Moravian sunrise service. This service, sponsored by all the Moravian church parishes in the City, attracts thousands of worshippers each year and has earned the name of "the Easter City" for Winston-Salem.

In 1849, the town of Winston was founded, named after a local hero of the Revolutionary War, Joseph Winston, who was well-known in the town of Salem. Shortly thereafter, both Winston and Salem were incorporated into the newly formed Forsyth County. It thrived as an industrial town, producing tobacco products, furniture and textiles. In 1851, Winston was designated the county seat, and, with plans to connect the cities of Winston and Salem, the county courthouse square was placed just one mile (1.6 km) north of Salem's square.

In 1889, the United States Post Office Department combined the mail offices for the two towns, and the towns were officially joined as "Winston-Salem" in 1913.

The Reynolds family, namesake of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, played a large role in the history and public life of Winston-Salem. By the 1940s, 60% of Winston-Salem workers worked either for Reynolds or in the Hanes textile factories. The Reynolds company imported so much French cigarette paper and Turkish tobacco for Camel cigarettes that Winston-Salem was designated by the United States federal government as an official port of entry for the United States, despite the city being 200 miles inland. Winston-Salem was the eighth-largest port of entry in the United States by 1916.

In 1917, the company bought 84 acres of property in Winston-Salem and built 180 houses that it sold at cost to workers, to form a development called "Reynoldstown." By the time R.J. Reynolds died in 1918, his company owned 121 buildings in Winston-Salem.

In the 1890s, Winston-Salem housed 35 separate tobacco factories, most of which were eventually bought out by R. J. Reynolds, who established the second-largest tobacco firm in the global tobacco industry in Winston-Salem in 1874. Today, RJR is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Reynolds American Inc., also headquartered in the city.

Winston-Salem is located at 36°6′10″N 80°15′38″W / 36.10278°N 80.26056°W / 36.10278; -80.26056 (36.102764, -80.260491).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 132.4  square miles (283.9 km²), of which, 129.6 square miles (281.9 km²) of it is land and 2.8 square miles (2.0 km²) of it (0.81%) is water.

In April 2007, Winston Salem, along with several other North Carolina cities, signed legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to pre-1990 levels, in an effort to combat global warming.

As of the census of 2000, there are 185,776 people, with a total urban population of 299,290, 76,247 households, and 46,205 families residing in the city. The population density is 1,706.7 people per square mile (659.0/km²). There are 82,593 housing units at an average density of 758.8/sq mi (293.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 55.57% White, 37.10% African American, 0.31% Native American, 1.13% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 4.29% from other races, and 1.56% from two or more races. 8.64% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 76,247 households out of which 28.0% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.2% are married couples living together, 16.6% have a female householder with no husband present, and 39.4% are non-families. 33.4% of all households are made up of individuals and 10.7% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.32 and the average family size is 2.95.

In the city the population is spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 11.7% from 18 to 24, 30.4% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 35 years. For every 100 females there are 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 84.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $39,589, and the median income for a family is $46,595. Males have a median income of $32,398 versus $25,335 for females. The per capita income for the city is $39,468. 11.2% of the population and 4.3% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 8.3% of those under the age of 18 and 7.1% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

A 2006 cost of living survey (Mercer) ranked Winston-Salem as the 124th most most expensive city in the U.S. or Europe, - slightly half as expensive as living in Moscow.

It is the location of the corporate headquarters of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, Inc., Branch Banking and Trust Company (BB&T), TW Garner Food Company (makers of Texas Pete), HanesBrands, Inc., Lowes Foods Stores, Southern Community Bank and ISP Sports. The Wachovia Corporation was based in Winston-Salem until it merged with First Union Corporation in September 2001; the corporate headquarters of the combined company are now in Charlotte, North Carolina. Although traditionally associated with the textile, furniture, and tobacco industries, Winston-Salem is attempting to attract new businesses in the nanotech, high-tech and bio-tech fields. Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is the largest employer in Winston-Salem. Blue Rhino, the nation's largest propane exchange company and a division of Ferrellgas, is also headquartered in Winston-Salem. In December 2004, the city landed a deal with Dell, Inc. to build a computer assembly plant nearby in southeastern Forsyth County. A portion of downtown Winston-Salem has been designated as the Piedmont Triad Research Park for biomedical and information technology research and development. Currently, the research park is undergoing an expansion, with hopes of jumpstarting the city's economy.

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools has most of its schools inside Winston-Salem. WS/FC Schools include 51 elementary schools, 25 middle schools and 21 high schools.

Private and parochial schools also make up a significant portion of Winston-Salem’s educational establishment.

Museums are an important portion of Winston-Salem's heritage. Most famous of Winston-Salem's museums is Old Salem Museums & Gardens, a living history museum centered on the main Moravian settlement founded in 1766. Along with the original 18th century buildings, Old Salem is also home to the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA), a gallery of 18th and 19th century furniture, ceramics, and textiles. The Reynolda House Museum of American Art (built by the founder of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and now affiliated with Wake Forest University) is another of Winston-Salem's premiere museums. The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) is a local art museum. The Wake Forest University Museum of Anthropology is an anthropological museum, maintained by Wake Forest University, that has many artifacts and other pieces of history. The city also offers places oriented for children. SciWorks is an interactive museum for children, teaching basics in all areas of science, and offering experiments and educational tours. The Children's Museum of Winston-Salem is based on literature, incorporating classic stories and fairy tales into its permanent and traveling exhibits for younger children.

Winston-Salem is often referred to as the "City of the Arts," in part because of its history, in having the first arts council in the United States, founded in 1949, and for the local art schools and attractions. These include the North Carolina School of the Arts, The Little Theatre of Winston-Salem, the Piedmont Opera Theater, the Winston-Salem Symphony, the Stevens Center for the Performing Arts, and the Sawtooth Center for Visual Arts. There are many galleries and workshops in the city's art district centered at Sixth and Trade streets. The city plays host to the National Black Theatre Festival, the RiverRun International Film Festival and the Revolve Film and Music Festival. Winston-Salem is also the home of the Art-o-mat and houses nine of them throughout the city. The city is also home to Carolina Music Ways, a grassroots arts organization focussing on the area's diverse, interconnected music traditions, including bluegrass, blues, jazz, gospel, old-time stringband, and Moravian music. Once a year the city is also the home of the Heavy Rebel Weekender music festival. Winston-Salem is also home to one of the largest 'Indie' music and art scenes in the state. The Werehouse, a local hang-out, artists' residence, and theatre is the center of this growing lifestyle and artistic genre.

Reynolda Gardens is a 4-acre (16,000 m2) formal garden set within a larger woodland site, originally part of the R. J. Reynolds country estate.

Winston-Salem provides a number of athletic attractions. The Dash are a Class A Minor-League baseball team currently affiliated with the Chicago White Sox. After 52 years at historic Ernie Shore Field, the Dash will now play its home games at the New Winston-Salem Ballpark from April to early September beginning in 2009. Its players have included Carlos Lee, Joe Crede, Jon Garland, and Aaron Rowand, all of whom have played extensively at the major league level. The newly-established Twin City Cyclones hockey team also make Winston-Salem home. They are in the Southern Professional Hockey League. Wake Forest University and Winston-Salem State University both have outstanding basketball programs. Wake Forest is an original member of the prestigious Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Among the successful NBA players who have graduated from Wake Forest are Tim Duncan, Josh Howard, Muggsy Bogues, Chris Paul, and Rodney Rogers, And From Winston-Salem State University Earl "The Pearl" Monroe. Wake Forest plays basketball in the Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum which seats 19,500 people; it quickly became one of the nation's toughest venues under former Wake Coach Skip Prosser. Since Prosser's arrival, Wake has frequently been nationally ranked in the Top 20 and has made numerous post season appearances, including a trip to the NCAA's Sweet Sixteen in 2004. Since Prosser's untimely death on July 26, 2007, Prosser's longtime assistant and friend Dino Gaudio has guided the Deacons. Wake Forest University's football team plays its games at BB&T Field (formerly Groves Stadium), which seats 32,500 and is located across the street from the Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum. Wake's football team won the ACC football championship in 2006 and played in the 2007 Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida.Also Wake Forest has one of the top soccer programs, that has made three straight final four apperences (2006,2007,2008) and were champions in 2007. Wake Forest also fields outstanding women's teams; its field hockey team won three consecutive national championships between 2002 and 2004. NASCAR Dodge Weekly Series racing takes place from March until August at city-owned Bowman Gray Stadium, after which the stadium is converted for football and is used by Winston-Salem State for Rams games. Besides major sports, Winston-Salem offers a variety of community and children's programs. Winston-Salem's YMCAs are a great place for exercise and athletics for both children and adults. Community recreation centers also provide cost-effective exercise and sports. Dodgeball is a recreational sport that has recently gained regional interest. Winston-Salem Parks and Recreation also maintains several community pools for which memberships are available.

The high school basketball talent in the Winston-Salem area has also traditionally been one of, if not the best, in North Carolina.

Winston-Salem is home to Hanes Mall, one of the largest shopping malls in North Carolina. The area surrounding the mall along Stratford Road, Silas Creek Parkway, and Hanes Mall Boulevard has become the city's largest shopping district. Numerous shopping centers have been built in the area, including Hanes Point Shopping Center, Hanes Commons, Pavilions, Stone's Throw Plaza, Silas Creek Crossing and Thruway Shopping Center.

Other major shopping areas are found along Peters Creek Parkway (home of Marketplace Mall), University Parkway, Jonestown Road, North Point Boulevard, Reynolda Road, and Robinhood Road.

US 52 (shared with NC 8) is the predominant north-south freeway through Winston-Salem; it passes through the heart of downtown. Business 40 is the main east-west freeway through downtown Winston-Salem, but further south, a bypass loop (built in 1993) of I-40 links many of the area's shopping districts. US 311, also a freeway, links Winston-Salem to High Point (southeast) and follows I-40 and US 52 through the Winston-Salem business district. US 421, which shares Business 40 through downtown, splits in the western part of the city onto its own freeway west (signed north) toward Wilkesboro, North Carolina and Boone, North Carolina.

The Winston Salem Northern Beltway is a proposed freeway that will loop around the city to the north, providing a route for the Future I-74 on the eastern section and the Future Auxiliary Route I-274 on the western section. The NCDOT plans for this project to begin after 2010.

By 2011, US 52 south of I-40 will be signed as Spur Route I-285. The Winston-Salem Department of Transportation also plans for the US 311 freeway to be extended north along the east side of the city to Business I-40 by 2030, according to the Long Range Plan.

Other major thoroughfares in Winston-Salem include NC 67 (Silas Creek Parkway & Reynolda Road), NC 150 (Peters Creek Parkway), U.S. Highway 158 (Stratford Road), University Parkway, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, North Point Boulevard, and Hanes Mall Boulevard.

Winston-Salem is served by Greensboro's Piedmont Triad International Airport. The airport also serves much of the surrounding Piedmont Triad area, including High Point, North Carolina.

A smaller airport, known as Smith Reynolds Airport, is located within the city limits, just northeast of downtown. It is mainly used for general aviation and charter flights. Every year, Smith Reynolds Airport hosts an air show for the general public. The Smith Reynolds Airport is home to the Winston-Salem Composite Squadron, Civil Air Patrol.

Amtrak runs a thruway motorcoach, twice daily in each direction, between Winston-Salem and the Amtrak station in nearby High Point. Buses depart from the Winston-Salem Transportation Center, then stop on the university campus before traveling to High Point. From the High Point station, riders can board the Crescent line or the Carolinian or Piedmont lines. These lines run directly to local North Carolina destinations as well as cities across the Southeast, as far west as New Orleans and as far north as New York City. Chicago is also accessible by transferring in Washington, D.C.

The Winston-Salem Journal is the main daily newspaper in Winston-Salem.

The Winston-Salem Chronicle is a weekly newspaper that focuses on the African-American community.

Q-Notes, a bi-weekly newspaper serving the LGBT community and published in Charlotte, is distributed to locations in Winston-Salem and via home delivery.

Winston-Salem Living Magazine is a full-color, glossy lifestyle magazine that highlights the local people and the community. Full video magazine available online.

Winston-Salem Business Magazine is a full-color magazine highlighting Winston-Salem business. The magazine is available online.

Winston-Salem Monthly magazine, published 12 times a year by Media General, celebrates "living well" in the Twin City by highlighting people, places, and events in this area.

These radio stations are located in Winston-Salem, and are listed by call letters, station number, and name. Many more radio stations can be picked up in Winston-Salem that are not located in Winston-Salem.

Winston-Salem makes up part of the Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point television designated market area. These stations are listed by call letters, channel number, network and city of license.

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North Carolina State University

First freshman class at North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1889.

North Carolina State University at Raleigh is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. Commonly known as NC State or NCSU, the University is the principal technological institution of the University of North Carolina system, and is a land, sea, and space grant institution.

The North Carolina General Assembly founded NC State on March 7, 1887, as a land-grant college. Today, NC State has an enrollment of more than 33,000 students, making it the largest university in North Carolina. While NC State has historical strengths in agriculture, design, engineering and textiles, it now offers 9 associate's degrees in agriculture, and more than 100 bachelor's degrees in disciplines including mathematics, meteorology, economics, political science, forestry, physics and education. The graduate school offers more than 100 areas of study leading to master's and doctoral degrees in fields such as psychology, public administration, statistics, and veterinary medicine.

The North Carolina General Assembly founded NC State on March 7, 1887 as a land-grant college under the name "North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts." As a land-grant college, NC State would provide a liberal and practical education while focusing on military tactics, agriculture and the mechanical arts without excluding classical studies. Since its founding, the university has maintained these objectives while building on them.

After opening in 1889, NC State saw its enrollment fluctuate and its mandate expand. During the Great Depression, the North Carolina government headed by Governor Oliver Max Gardner, administratively combined the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Women's College at Greensboro, and NC State. This conglomeration became the University of North Carolina in 1971. After World War II, the university has constantly grown and changed. In the summer of 1956, North Carolina State University enrolled its first African-American undergraduates, Edward Carson and Manuel Crockett.

In 1966, single year enrollment reached 10,000. The 1970s saw enrollment surpass 19,000 and the addition of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. NC State celebrated its centennial in 1987 and reorganized its internal structure renaming all its schools to colleges (e.g. School of Engineering to the College of Engineering). Also in this year, it gained 700 acres (2.8 km2) of land that would later become the Centennial Campus. During the next decade and a half and continuing today, NC State has focused on developing its new Centennial Campus. Over $620 million has been invested in facilities and infrastructure at the new campus with 62 acres (0.3 km2) of space being constructed. There are 61 private and government agency partners located here as well.

Currently, NC State has almost 8,000 employees, over 31,000 students, a $1.01 billion annual budget, and a $535 million endowment. It the largest university in the state and one of the anchors of North Carolina's Research Triangle, together with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

NC State's Main Campus has three general areas: North Campus, Central Campus, and South Campus. North Campus is the oldest part of NC State and is home to most academic departments and a few residence halls. Central Campus is mainly residence halls, cafeterias, gymnasiums and student support departments. North and Central Campus are separated by a rail road track. Pedestrian and road tunnels are used to cross the tracks. Western Boulevard separates Central and South Campuses. Greek Court and a large conference center are found on South Campus. Main Campus is also divided into West, Central, and East Campus. West and Central campuses are divided by Dan Allen Drive, while Central and East are divided by Morill Drive and Reynolds Coliseum.

Architecturally, Main Campus is known for its distinctive red brick buildings. Because of oversupply, odd brick statues dot the landscape, a large section of main campus is paved over with brick (University Plaza, a.k.a. "The Brickyard"), and most sidewalks are also made with brick. These sidewalks are also dotted with white brick mosaics.

The Memorial Bell Tower, located in the Northeast corner of North Campus, serves as the signature of NC State and appears in the NC State Official Seal. It was constructed as a monument to alumni killed in World War I. The granite tower, completed in 1937, is 115 feet (35 m) tall. As a tradition, the Bell Tower is lit in red at night immediately following athletic victories and certain academic achievements. The Bell Tower, however, does not actually have a bell; The carillon system that can be heard ringing from the bell tower is actually housed in nearby Holladay Hall. There are plans to move the bell from Withers Hall to the bell tower during slated renovations.

The Court of North Carolina, just West of the Memorial Bell Tower, is surrounded by the 1911 Building; the College of Humanities and Social Sciences in Tompkins, Caldwell, Winston Halls and Poe Hall; Page Hall, home to College of Engineering offices; and Leazar Hall, former location of the Computer Science Teaching Labs. It was once home to 100 trees (one for every county in North Carolina), but damage caused by Hurricane Fran in 1996 reduced the number significantly, including the destruction of a particularly old and large tree which was some 12 feet (3.7 m) in diameter. Some replanting has occurred, but the Court's former appearance is far from being restored.

Southwest of the Court of North Carolina is another landmark, the Free Expression Tunnel. The Tunnel functions as one of three pedestrian tunnels underneath the railroad tracks separating North Campus and Central Campus. This particular tunnel is the site of sanctioned graffiti; anyone may paint there, and it is often the place for political statements, personal messages, and art.

NC State's main campus is augmented by the 1,334-acre (5.4 km2) mixed-use Centennial Campus. Located 1 mi (1.6 km) south of the Memorial Bell Tower, this campus houses university, corporate, and government research, in addition to classrooms and non-student residences. The College of Textiles is based on this campus and long-term plans have the majority of the College of Engineering relocating to the new campus, which has already begun with the addition of two buildings, Engineering Building I and Engineering Building II. The offices of Red Hat and the Raleigh branch of the National Weather Service are also on the Centennial Campus, as well as Centennial Campus Middle School.

West Campus is located 2.5 mi (4.0 km) west of the Memorial Bell Tower. The campus's 182 acres (0.7 km2) is bordered by the stadiums and the North Carolina State Fairgrounds to the west and Meredith College to the east. Situated on this campus is the University Club and North Carolina's only veterinary school. Since most of the Veterinary School campus is rolling pastoral land, part of it is converted to parking space during the North Carolina State Fair and NC State football games.

J. C. Raulston Arboretum is an 8-acre (0.03 km2) arboretum and botanical garden operated by NC State, and located just south of West Campus. It is open daily without charge.

The stadium property is 3.4 mi (5.5 km) northwest of the Memorial Bell Tower. Both Carter-Finley Stadium and the RBC Center are located there. Aside from the two stadiums, the property is mainly open space used for event parking. The property borders the North Carolina State Fair to the North and hosts tailgating parties before NC State football games.

NC State is one of 16 campuses that constitute the University of North Carolina system. Each campus has a high degree of independence, but each submits to the policies of the UNC system Board of Governors. The 32 voting members of the Board of Governors are elected by the North Carolina General Assembly for four-year terms. President Erskine Bowles heads the system.

The Board of Trustees of NC State has thirteen members and set all policies for the University. The UNC system Board of Governors elects eight of the trustees and the Governor of North Carolina appoints four. The student body president serves on the Board of Trustees as a voting member. The UNC system also elects the Chancellor of NC State, currently James L. Oblinger.

The Board of Trustees administers NC State's eleven academic colleges. Each college grants its own degrees with the exception of the First Year College which provides incoming freshmen the opportunity to experience several disciplines before selecting a major. The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is the only college to offer associate's degrees and the College of Veterinary Medicine does not grant undergraduate degrees. Each college is composed of numerous departments that focus on a particular discipline or degree program, for example English, Computer Science, or Accounting. There are a total of 66 departments administered by all eleven NC State colleges.

In total, NC State offers 9 associate's degrees in agriculture, bachelor's degrees in 102 areas of study, master's degrees in 108 areas and doctorate degrees in 60 areas. NC State is known for its programs in agriculture, engineering and science. The textile and paper science programs are notable, given the uniqueness of the subject area.

Considered a more selective university, NC State accepts fewer than 61% of those who apply for undergraduate admissions. For the class of 2012, over 18,000 applicants applied for admission to N.C. State for a freshman class of 4,700. This was the largest application pool ever at N.C. State and the highest among the UNC system. This class includes about 160 valedictorians and salutatorians. About 48% were ranked in the top 10% of their class and 71% ranked in the top 20%. The mean GPA for freshman entering fall of 2008 was 4.12. Transfer admission is also as competitive. Over 3,000 students apply for one of the 1,500 places in the transfer class at NCSU.

NC State requires undergraduate admission candidates to choose a preferred college of study. After determining that an applicant meets the overall university requirements, the individual college must also agree to accept the student. Because of this process, some colleges have significantly higher admission requirements than others. For example, the College of Engineering has higher admission standards than the College of Natural Resources. In addition, students might have a difficult time transferring between colleges. Transferring to the College of Design from another college could be difficult because of lack of design experience.

The Graduate School reviews all postgraduate education applications. For fall 2005, 7,206 prospective students applied to the Graduate School; 2836 (39.4%) were admitted. Of these, 1,755 (61.9%) enrolled. Total fall 2005 graduate enrollment 6,128.

The library system at NC State, ranked 27th out of 113 North American research libraries, includes 3.4 million volumes and 54 thousand journal subscriptions (as of 2005). The library system has an annual budget of over $20 million and consists of five libraries. The largest library, D. H. Hill Library, located on Main Campus is over eleven stories tall and covers over 119 thousand square feet (11 thousand square meters). NC State, as a member of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN), has interlibrary loan services with Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and North Carolina Central University.

US News and World Report places NC State 85th out of 248 national universities in the US (34th out of public colleges). The Shanghai Jiao Tong University's Academic Ranking of World Universities positions NC State 101st among 500 world universities in terms of scientific research leading towards a Nobel Prize in 2005.

NC State is rated twelfth among the nation's colleges and universities in terms of value, according to Kiplinger's Personal Finance. In 2006, NC State was ranked second by Princeton Review and fifth by U.S. News & World Report on their lists of best values among the nation's public colleges and universities.

There are several notable scholarships of North Carolina State University which include: The Park Scholarship Program - Made possible by generous financial support from the Park Foundation of Ithaca, New York, The Park Scholarship Program was established in 1996. Among the most prestigious undergraduate merit scholarships, the Park program pays expenses for 4 years of study at NC State, a one time computer stipend, and costs associated with enrichment activities. There are approximately 35 in-state scholarships (valued at $62,000) and 15 out-of-state scholarships (valued at $107,000) awarded each year to incoming freshman at North Carolina State University. Selection is based upon scholarship, service, leadership, and character.

The Caldwell Fellows Program - Created by the NC State Alumni Association to honor the legacy of former Chancellor John T. Caldwell, the Caldwell Fellows Program is a leadership development scholarship program with a strong focus on servant leadership. To be eligible, an applicant must be a full-time, first-year student at NC State University with a GPA of 3.25 or greater and meet the program's selection criteria. Caldwell Fellows are selected on the basis of strong academic performance, leadership potential, orientation toward community and service, commitment to personal growth and a demonstrated interest in and commitment to maximizing program opportunities. Students that go through the program are challenged by Dr. Caldwell's charge to "THINK BIG" in all their pursuits.

The athletic teams of NC State, known as the Wolfpack, compete in 24 intercollegiate varsity sports. NC State is a founding member of the Atlantic Coast Conference and has won eight national championships: two NCAA championships, two AIAW championships, and four titles under other sanctioning bodies. Most NC State fans and athletes recognize the rivalry with the North Carolina Tar Heels as their biggest. NC State was a founding member of the Southern Conference and is also one of the four teams on Tobacco Road.

The primary logo for NC State athletics is a red block 'S' with an inscribed 'N' and 'C'. The block S has been in use since 1890 but has seen many alterations through the years. It became the sole logo for all NC State athletic teams in 2000 and was modernized to its current design in 2006.

Thirty-three percent of all students live on campus in one of twenty different residence halls. Most residence halls provide academic and social events as well as host programs that acclimate incoming students to the college experience. Each residence hall or residence hall area has an elected council to provide for local event programming and an outlet for student concerns. Collectively, representatives from each hall make up the Inter-Residence Council which represents the on-campus residence-life community as a whole.

While Greeks do offer some social events, many residence halls host their own events, though alcohol policies are strictly enforced. One significant party is the "Design School Halloween Bash" hosted by the College of Design every October. By far the largest party and social events are those associated with sporting events.

The student center of the University includes an African American Cultural Center which has an art gallery and a library. There is also a multicultural student affairs office.

Student life at North Carolina State University includes opportunities in a diverse range of activities and organizations. Besides fraternities and sororities, there are multicultural groups, arts groups, political and social action groups, service and professional groups, religious groups, sports and recreation groups, academic and professional groups, and special interest groups such as the Clogging Team, the Film Society, the Judo Club, the Equestrian Club, and the Black Finesse Modeling Troupe.

Founded in 1921, NC State Student Government is a student-run organization that serves as the official voice of the student body and attempts to better the student experience at the University. Both a governing body and an advocacy group, Student Government is involved in policy-making, adjudication, programming, advocating, community service, and countless other activities. The organization is a clearinghouse for concerns from students and answers from administrators. The organization also is responsible for distributing a portion of the fees it receives to student organizations in a process known as appropriations.

The Student Government at NC State is composed of three branches. The Student Senate is a 64-member body that legislative policy and Student Government budgets. The Student Body President heads the executive branch. The president executes policy passed by the senate and is a member of the NC State Board of Trustees. The Student Chief Justice heads the judicial branch and is the only student body elected member of the branch.

Homecoming week, usually at the end of October, starts with a Kickoff event and ends with the Pack Howl pep rally and concert. Featured performers have included Lonestar, Ludacris, Chris Daughtry, and most recently Cartel, Guster and The Avett Brothers.

During the week, events such as Wear Red-Get Fed, a parade down Hillsborough Street, and a campus-wide Spirit Competition take place. The week also includes a Leader of the Pack competition honoring NC State's brightest and most passionate female and male student leaders. This year's recipients were Anna Patton, a junior in Psychology, and Nick Schultz, a junior in Civil Engineering.

The Shack-A-Thon, an NCSU tradition since 1991, is NC State's Habitat for Humanity's annual fall fundraiser. Habitat for Humanity and many other student organizations take over the Brickyard by building shacks that the students live, sleep, and study in for an entire week. Each group raises money by collecting from people walking through the brickyard.

A more recent tradition of NC State is the Krispy Kreme Challenge. In this race, students meet at the University's Memorial Bell Tower, then run to a Krispy Kreme shop 2 mi (3.2 km) away. Each student must eat twelve glazed doughnuts, then run back to the Bell Tower within one hour. The Challenge was listed as one of the "102 Things You Gotta Do Before You Graduate" by Sports Illustrated.

Occurring on the last day of classes (before finals), it is a bar crawl that starts at one end of campus at Memorial Bell Tower and ends at the other end of Hillsborough Street. The goal is to get a drink from every bar.Typically, the hike incorporates all of the "traditional" bars on the street that have been in the area for decades. These bars include Sadlack's Heroes, Player's Retreat (PR), and Mitch's Tavern; though not officially a bar, the Western Lanes bowling alley is also a popular stop. Although, gas stations and general stores have also become frequented and accepted stops along the "hike".

Technician has been NC State's student-run newspaper since 1920. It employs more than 100 students throughout the year and reports on campus news, sports, entertainment, and state and national news. Technician is published Monday through Friday when school is in session with a circulation of about 15,000. The paper is funded by advertisement and a student media fee; it is distributed for free at numerous locations on campus and at area merchants.

NC State's oldest student publication, the Agromeck yearbook, celebrated its 100th birthday with the 2002 edition. It acts as a compendium of student life on campus including sporting events, social activities, and day-to-day living. The yearbook serves as a historian of campus and is a reminder of the way things used to be. Each year, nearly 1,000 copies are printed and sold.

The University has its own student-run radio station, WKNC. WKNC is a non-commercial station and cannot run traditional advertisements. It does seek sponsors, who can be acknowledged on the air, but 90% of the station's funding is from the university. The radio station broadcasts at 25,000 watts and reaches around 200,000 people. The station host several formats run by student disc jockeys.

NC State has 156,297 living alumni with 61% of alumni living in North Carolina. There are 100 alumni clubs in North Carolina and another 42 states also have active clubs. In addition to alumni, the university employs 2,040 faculty and 5,843 staff. A number of NC State alumni and faculty have made significant contributions in the fields of government, military, science, academia, business, arts, and athletics, among others.

John Edwards, former senator and two time presidential candidate, and James B. Hunt Jr., 4-term Governor of North Carolina, are among the most notable alumni with involvement in politics. Combining science and politics, Rajendra Kumar Pachauri is the elected chief of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an organization that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore.

Several alumni hold or have held top positions at large companies. These include: Caterpillar Inc. (James W. Owens), Thomasville Furniture Industries (Nancy Webster), DuPont (Ed Woolard), SAS Institute (James Goodnight), Citrix Systems (Mark Templeton) and MurFam Enterprises (Wendell Murphy). Donald Bitzer, the father of Plasma Television and Emmy Award winner currently sits on the faculty of NC State.

Some alumni have become national academic leaders. Albert Carnesale was the chancellor of UCLA from 1997 to 2006 after a 23 year tenure at Harvard University. Bill Friday served as president of the University of North Carolina system for 30 years. William Brantley Aycock served as chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1957 until 1964.

Several NC State students later became professional athletes. Bill Cowher coached 15 seasons with the Steelers including the Super Bowl XL championship team and he currently is a studio analyst for The NFL Today. Over 130 NC State alumni play or have played in the NFL including current players Torry Holt who plays for the St. Louis Rams, #1 pick Mario Williams who plays for the Houston Texans, and Philip Rivers who plays for the San Diego Chargers. Another 41 alumni have played for the NBA including hall of famer David Thompson and players Cedric Simmons, Julius Hodge, J.J. Hickson, Josh Powell, and Thurl Bailey.

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Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh, North Carolina in 1872

Raleigh (pronounced , IPA: /ˈrɑli/ RA-lee) is the capital of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County. Raleigh is known as the “City of Oaks” for its many oak trees. It is the second most populous city in North Carolina after Charlotte. The estimated population on July 1, 2008 was 380,173. Since 2006, it has been the 15th fastest growing city in the United States. Its population has grown by more than 100,000 since 2000, an increase of nearly 40%.

Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill make up the three historically primary cities of the Research Triangle metropolitan region. The regional nickname of "The Triangle" originated after the 1959 creation of the Research Triangle Park, located between the cities of Raleigh and Durham. The Research Triangle region encompasses the U.S. Census Bureau's Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of Raleigh-Durham-Cary in the central Piedmont region of North Carolina. The estimated population of the Raleigh-Durham-Cary CSA was 1,635,974 as of July 1, 2007, with the Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) portion estimated at 1,047,629 residents.

Most of Raleigh is located within Wake County, with a very small portion extending into Durham County. The towns of Cary, Garner, Wake Forest, Apex, Holly Springs, Fuquay-Varina, Knightdale, Wendell, and Rolesville are some of Raleigh's primary nearby suburbs and satellite towns.

In December 1770, Joel Lane successfully petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly to create a new county, resulting in the formation of Wake County. The county was formed from portions of Cumberland, Orange and Johnston counties. the county gets its name from Margaret Wake Tryon, the wife of Governor William Tryon. The first county seat was Bloomsbury.

Raleigh was chosen as the site of a new state capital in 1788. It was officially established in 1792 as both the new county seat and the new state capital. The city was named in 1792 for Sir Walter Raleigh, sponsor of the Colony of Roanoke. The "Lost Colony" is commemorated at the Fort Raleigh National Historic Site on Roanoke Island, North Carolina.

The city's location was chosen, in part, for being within 10 miles (16 km) of Isaac Hunter's Tavern, a popular tavern frequented by the state legislators. No known city or town existed previously on the chosen city site. Raleigh is one of the few cities in the United States that was planned and built specifically to serve as a state capital. Its original boundaries were formed by the downtown streets of North, East, West and South streets. It was planned to be laid out in an axial fashion, with four public squares and one central square.

The North Carolina General Assembly first met in Raleigh in December 1794, and quickly granted the city a charter, with a board of seven appointed commissioners (elected by the city after 1803) and an "Intendant of Police" (which would eventually become the office of Mayor) to govern it. In 1799, the N.C. Minerva and Raleigh Advertiser became the first newspaper published in Raleigh. John Haywood was the first Intendant of Police.

In 1808 Andrew Johnson, the nation’s seventeenth President, was born at Casso’s Inn in Raleigh. The city's first water supply network was completed in 1818, although due to system failures the project was abandoned. 1819 saw the arrival of Raleigh's first volunteer fire company, followed in 1821 by a full-time fire company.

In 1831, a fire destroyed the State Capitol. Reconstruction began two years later with quarried granite being delivered by the first railroad in the state. Raleigh celebrated the completions of the new Capitol and new Raleigh & Gaston Railroad Company in 1840.

In 1853, the first State Fair was held near Raleigh.

The first institution of higher learning in Raleigh, Peace College, was established in 1858.

After the War began, Governor Zebulon Baird Vance ordered the construction of breastworks around the city as protection from Union troops. During General Sherman's Carolinas Campaign, Raleigh was captured by Union cavalry under the command of General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick on April 13, 1865. After the Confederate cavalry retreated west , the Union soldiers followed, leading to the nearby Battle of Morrisville. The city was spared significant destruction during the War, but due to the economic problems of the post-war period and Reconstruction, it grew little over the next several decades.

After the Civil War ended in 1865, African Americans were able to be educated and men could become involved in politics. With the help of the Freedmen's Bureau, many freedmen migrated from rural areas to Raleigh. Shaw University, the South's first African-American college, began classes in 1865 and was chartered in 1875. Shaw's Estey Hall was the first building constructed for the higher education of black women, and Leonard Medical Center was the first four-year medical school in the country for African Americans.

In 1867, Episcopal clergy founded St. Augustine's College for the education of freedmen. In 1869, the state legislature approved the nation’s first school for blind and deaf African Americans to be located in Raleigh. And in 1874, the city's Federal Building was constructed in Raleigh, the first Federal Government project in the South following the Civil War.

In 1880, the newspapers News and Observer combined to form The News & Observer. It remains Raleigh's primary daily newspaper. The North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, now known as North Carolina State University, was founded as a land-grant college in 1887. The city's Rex Hospital opened in 1889 and housed the state's first nursing school. The Baptist Women's College, now known as Meredith College, opened in 1891.

In 1900, the state legislature passed a new constitution, with voter registration rules that disenfranchised most blacks and many poor whites. Added to earlier statutory restrictions, the state succeeded in reducing black voting to zero by 1908. It was not until 1965 that the majority of blacks in North Carolina would again be able to vote, sit on juries and serve in local offices.

In 1912, Bloomsbury Park opened, featuring a popular carousel ride. Relocated to Pullen Park, the carousel is still operating.

From 1914-1917, an influenza epidemic killed 288 Raleigh citizens. The state of North Carolina lost a total of 5,799 men in the World War I.

In 1922, WLAC signed on as the city's first radio station, but lasted only two years. WFBQ signed on in 1924 and became WPTF in 1927. It is now Raleigh's oldest continuous radio broadcaster.

The city's first airport, Curtiss-Wright Flying Field opened in 1929. That same year, the stock market crash resulted in six Raleigh banks closing.

During the difficult 1930s of the Great Depression, government at all levels was integral to creating jobs. The city provided recreational and educational programs, and hired people for public works projects. In 1932, Raleigh Memorial Auditorium was dedicated. The North Carolina Symphony, founded the same year, performed in its new home. From 1934-1937, the federal Civilian Conservation Corps constructed the area now know as William B. Umstead State Park. In 1939, the State General Assembly chartered the Raleigh-Durham Aeronautical Authority to build a larger airport between Raleigh and Durham, with the first flight occurring in 1943.

In 1947, Raleigh citizens adopted a council-manager form of government, the current form.

Raleigh experienced significant damage from Hurricane Hazel in 1954.

In 1956, WRAL-TV became the first local television station.

With the opening of the Research Triangle Park in 1957, Raleigh began to experience a population increase, resulting in a total city population of 100,000 by 1960.

Following passage of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the main achievements of the African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) and the Lyndon Johnson presidency, political participation and voting by African Americans in Raleigh increased rapidly. In 1967, Clarence E. Lightner was elected to the City Council, and in 1973 became Raleigh's first African-American mayor.

In 1976, the Raleigh City and Wake County schools merged to become the Wake County Public School System, now the largest school system in the state and 19th largest in the country.

During the 1970s and 1980s, the I-440 beltline was constructed, easing traffic congestion and providing access to most major city roads.

The first Raleigh Convention Center (replaced in 2008) and Fayetteville Street Mall were both opened in 1977. Fayetteville Street was turned into a pedestrian-only street in an effort to help the then-ailing downtown area, but the plan was flawed and business declined for years to come. Fayetteville Street was reopened in 2007 as the main thoroughfare of Raleigh's downtown.

In 1991, two large skyscrapers in Raleigh were completed, First Union Capital Center and Two Hanover Plaza, along with the popular Walnut Creek Amphitheatre in Southeast Raleigh.

In 1996, the Olympic Torch passed through Raleigh while on its way to the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. Also in 1996, Hurricane Fran struck the area, causing massive flooding and extensive structural damage.

In 1999, the RBC Center arena opened to provide a venue for the National Hockey League's Carolina Hurricanes and NC State Wolfpack men's basketball teams.

In 2001, the Raleigh Memorial Auditorium complex was expanded with the addition of the Progress Energy Center for the Performing Arts, Meymandi Concert Hall, Fletcher Opera Theater, Kennedy Theatre, Betty Ray McCain Gallery and Lichtin Plaza.

Fayetteville Street reopened to vehicular traffic in 2006. A variety of downtown building projects began around this time including the 34-story RBC Bank Tower, multiple condominium projects and several new restaurants. Additional skyscrapers are in the proposal/planning phase.

With the opening of parts of I-540 from 2005-2007, a new 70-mile (110 km) loop around Wake County, traffic congestion eased somewhat in the North Raleigh area. Completion of the entire loop is expected to take another 15 years.

In 2008, the city's Fayetteville Street Historic District joined the National Register of Historic Places.

Also in 2008, Raleigh has featured prominently in a number of "Top 10 Lists," including those by Forbes, MSNBC and Money Magazine, due to its quality of life and business climate.

Raleigh operates under a council-manager government. The city council consists of eight members; all seats, including the mayor's, are open for election every two years. Five of the council seats are district representatives and two seats are citywide representatives elected at-large. Historically, Raleigh voters have tended to elect conservative Democrats in local, state, and national elections, a holdover from their one-party system of the late 19th century.

In 2008, 34 murders or non-negligent cases of manslaughter were reported within Raleigh's city limits, per the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reports.

Mayor Charles Meeker is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition, a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The coalition is co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Raleigh averages a rate of 469.2 motor vehicle thefts per year per 100,000 residents, below the average rate of 528.4 motor vehicle thefts per year per 100,000 residents for all metropolitan areas in North Carolina.

According to the Uniform Crime Reports, crime in Raleigh has steadily decreased in recent years. In 2004, there were 580 reported incidents of violent crime and 3,768 reported incidents of property crime reported per 100,000 population. Nationally there were 466 violent crimes and 3,517 property crimes reported per 100,000 population, while U.S. cities with a population between 250,000 and 500,000 residents reported 978 violent crimes and 5,631 property crimes per 100,000 population,.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Raleigh occupies a total area of 115.6 square miles (299.3 km²), of which 114.6 square miles (296.8 km²) is dry land and 1.0 square miles (2.5 km²)(0.84%) is covered by water.

Raleigh is located in the northeast central region of North Carolina, where the North American Piedmont and Atlantic Coastal Plain regions meet. This area is known as the "fall line" because it marks the elevation inland at which waterfalls begin to appear in creeks and rivers. As a result, most of Raleigh features gently rolling hills that slope eastward toward the state's flat coastal plain. Its central Piedmont location situates Raleigh about three hours west of Atlantic Beach, North Carolina, by car and four hours east of the Great Smoky Mountains of the Appalachian range. The city is 145 miles (233 km) south of Richmond, Virginia; 232 miles (373 km) south of Washington, D.C.; and 143 miles (230 km) northeast of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Raleigh enjoys a temperate subtropical climate, with generally moderate temperatures during spring and autumn. Summers are typically warm to hot. Winters are cool to cold and wet with highs generally in the range of upper 40s to low 50s°F (8 to 11 °C) with lows in the mid 20s to low 30s°F (-4 to 0°C), although an occasional 60°F (15°C) or warmer winter day is not uncommon. The record low temperature recorded at the RDU Airport is -9°F set back in 1985(-22°C). Occasional single digit temperatures can be experienced in any given winter. Spring and Autumn days usually reach the low/mid 70s°F (low 20s°C), with lows at night in the lower 50s°F (10 to 14°C). Summer daytime highs often reach mid to upper 80s to low 90s°F (29 to 35°C) with cooler nights between 65°F to 70°F. The region's rainiest months are January and March with the driest months being April and November.

Raleigh receives an average of 7.0" of snow in winter. Freezing rain and sleet also occur most winters, and occasionally the area experiences a major damaging ice storm. The region also experiences occasional periods of drought, during which the city sometimes has restricted water use by residents.

Raleigh is divided into seven major geographic areas, each of which use a Raleigh address and a ZIP code that begins with the digits 276.

Downtown/Old Raleigh ("Inside the Beltline") is home to historic neighborhoods and buildings such as the Sir Walter Raleigh Hotel built in the early 20th century, the restored City Market, the Fayetteville Street downtown business district, as well as the North Carolina Museum of History, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, North Carolina State Capitol, Peace College, the Raleigh City Museum, Raleigh Convention Center, Shaw University, and Saint Augustine's College. The neighborhoods in Old Raleigh include Cameron Park, Boylan Heights, Country Club Hills, Coley Forest, Five Points, Glenwood-Brooklyn, Hayes Barton, Moore Square, Mordecai, Belvidere Park, Woodcrest, and Historic Oakwood.

East Raleigh is situated roughly from Capital Boulevard near the I-440 beltline to New Hope Road. Most of East Raleigh's development is along primary corridors such as U.S. 1 (Capital Boulevard), New Bern Avenue, Poole Road, Buffaloe Road, and New Hope Road. Neighborhoods in East Raleigh include New Hope, and Wilder's Grove. The area is bordered to the east by the town of Knightdale.

West Raleigh lies along Hillsborough Street and Western Boulevard. The area is bordered to the west by suburban Cary. It is home to North Carolina State University, Meredith College, Pullen Park, Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, Cameron Village, Lake Johnson, the North Carolina Museum of Art and historic Saint Mary's School. Primary thoroughfares serving West Raleigh, in addition to Hillsborough Street, are Avent Ferry Road, Blue Ridge Road, and Western Boulevard.

North Raleigh is an expansive, diverse, and fast-growing suburban area of the city that is home to established neighborhoods to the south along with many newly built subdivisions and along its northern fringes. The area generally falls North of Millbrook Road. It is primarily suburban with large shopping areas. Primary neighborhoods and subdivisions in North Raleigh include Bedford, Bent Tree, Brentwood, Brookhaven, Crossgate, Falls River, North Ridge, Stonebridge, Stone Creek, Stonehenge, Wakefield, Windsor Forest, and Wood Valley. The area is served by a number of primary transportation corridors including Glenwood Avenue (U.S. Route 70), Wake Forest Road, Millbrook Road, Lynn Road, Six Forks Road, Spring Forest Road, Creedmoor Road, Leesville Road, and Strickland Road, as well as the Interstate-540 Expressway.

Midtown Raleigh, which used to be considered a part of North Raleigh, is a residential and commercial area just North of the I-440 Beltline. It is roughly framed by Glenwood/Creedmoor Road to the West, Wake Forest Road to the East, and Millbrook Road to the North. It includes shopping centers such as North Hills and Crabtree Valley Mall. It also includes the upcoming high-rise Soleil Center, as well as North Hills Park and part of the Raleigh Greenway System.

South Raleigh is located along U.S. 401 South toward Fuquay-Varina and along US 70 into suburban Garner. This area is the least developed and least dense area of Raleigh (much of the area lies within the Swift Creek watershed district, where development regulations limit housing densities and construction). The area is bordered to the west by Cary, to the east by Garner, and to the southwest by Holly Springs. Neighborhoods in South Raleigh include Lake Wheeler, Swift Creek, Riverbrooke, and Enchanted Oaks.

Southeast Raleigh is bounded by downtown on the west, Garner on the southwest, and rural Wake County to the southeast. The area includes areas along Rock Quarry Road, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, and New Bern Avenue. This area is very diverse, with new suburban developments to poor inner-city neighborhoods. Many of the older neighborhoods are historically African American and date back to the end of the Civil War. Primary neighborhoods include Chavis Heights, Raleigh Country Club, Southgate, and Biltmore Hills. Time Warner Cable Music Pavilion (formerly Alltel Pavilion and Walnut Creek Amphitheatre) is one of the region's major outdoor concert venues and is located on Rock Quarry Road.

Raleigh's industrial base includes electrical, medical, electronic and telecommunications equipment; clothing and apparel; food processing; paper products; and pharmaceuticals. Raleigh is part of North Carolina's Research Triangle, one of the country's largest and most successful research parks and a major center in the United States for high-tech and biotech research, as well as advanced textile development. The city is a major retail shipping point for eastern North Carolina and a wholesale distributing point for the grocery industry.

As of the 2000 United States census, there were 276,093 persons (July 2008 estimate was 380,173) and 61,371 families residing in Raleigh. The population density was 2,409.2 people per square mile (930.2/km²). There were 120,699 housing units at an average density of 1,053.2/sq mi (406.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.31% White, 27.80% African American, 0.36% Native American, 3.38% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 3.24% of other races, and 1.88% of two or more races. Residents who described themselves as Hispanic or Latino of any race represented 7.01% of the population.

There were 112,608 households in the city in 2000, of which 26.5% included children below the age of 18, 39.5% were composed of married couples living together, 11.4% reported a female householder with no husband present, and 45.5% classified themselves as nonfamily. In addition, 33.1% of all households were composed of individuals living alone, of which 6.2% was someone 65 years of age or older. The average household size in Raleigh was 2.30 persons, and the average family size was 2.97 persons.

Raleigh's population in 2000 was evenly distributed with 20.9% below the age of 18, 15.9% aged 18 to 24, 36.6% from 25 to 44, and 18.4% from 45 to 64. An estimated 8.3% of the population was 65 years of age or older, and the median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.0 males; for every 100 females aged 18 or older, there were 96.6 males aged 18 or older.

The median household income in the city was $46,612 in 2000, and the median family income was $60,003. Males earned a median income of $39,248, versus $30,656 for females. The median per-capita income for the city was $25,113, and an estimated 11.5% of the population and 7.1% of families were living below the poverty line. Of the total population, 13.8% of those below the age of 18, and 9.3% of those 65 and older, were living below the poverty line.

In addition, the Campbell University Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law has announced that it will move to downtown Raleigh from the nearby town of Buies Creek by 2009.

Public schools in Raleigh are operated by the Wake County Public School System. Observers have praised the Wake County Public School System for its innovative efforts to maintain a socially, economically and racial balanced system by using income as a prime factor in assigning students to schools.

As of August 2008, Wake County had the highest estimated number of home-schoolers in the state, with 7,059 students. North Carolina law defines a home school as a non-public school in which the student receives academic instruction from his/her parent, legal guardian, or a member of the household in which the student resides. The home school academic instructional setting must always meet the home school legal definition of G.S. 115C-563(a) and is limited to students from no more than two households. These schools are administered independently of the Wake County Public School System and are registered with the State of North Carolina Department of Non-Public Education.

The Time Warner Cable Music Pavilion at Walnut Creek hosts major international touring acts. The Progress Energy Center for the Performing Arts complex houses the Raleigh Memorial Auditorium, the Fletcher Opera Theater, the Kennedy Theatre, and the Meymandi Concert Hall. During the North Carolina State Fair, Dorton Arena hosts headline acts. In 2008, a new theatre space, the Meymandi Theatre at the Murphey School, was opened in the restored auditorium of the historic Murphey School. Theater performances are also offered at the Raleigh Little Theatre, Long View Center, Theatre in the Park, and Stewart Theater at North Carolina State University.

Raleigh is home to several professional arts organizations, including the North Carolina Symphony, the Opera Company of North Carolina, Burning Coal Theatre Company, the North Carolina Theatre, Broadway Series South and the Carolina Ballet. The numerous local colleges and universities significantly add to the options available for viewing live performances.

North Carolina Museum of Art, occupying a large suburban campus on Blue Ridge Road near the North Carolina State Fairgrounds, maintains one of the premier public art collections located between Washington, D.C., and Atlanta. In addition to its extensive collections of American Art, European Art and ancient art, the museum recently has hosted major exhibitions featuring Auguste Rodin (in 2000) and Claude Monet (in 2006-07), each attracting more than 200,000 visitors. Unlike most prominent public museums, the North Carolina Museum of Art acquired a large number of the works in its permanent collection through purchases with public funds. The museum's outdoor park is one of the largest such art parks in the country. The museum facility is currently undergoing a major expansion, scheduled for completion in 2010.

The National Hockey League's Carolina Hurricanes franchise moved to Raleigh in 1997 from Hartford, Connecticut (where it was known as the Hartford Whalers). The team played its first two seasons in the nearby city of Greensboro, while its home arena, Raleigh's RBC Center was under construction. The Hurricanes are the only major league (NFL, NHL, NBA, MLB) professional sports team in North Carolina to have won a championship, winning the Stanley Cup in 2006, over the Edmonton Oilers.

In addition to the Hurricanes, the Carolina Railhawks of the United Soccer Leagues play in suburban Cary to the west; the Carolina Mudcats, an AA minor-league baseball team, play in the city's eastern suburbs; and the Durham Bulls, the AAA minor-league baseball team made internationally famous by the movie Bull Durham, play in the neighboring city of Durham.

Several other professional sports leagues have had former franchises (now defunct) in Raleigh, including the Arena Football League; the World League of American Football; the Raleigh Cougars of the United States Basketball League; and most recently, the Carolina Courage of the Women's United Soccer Association (in suburban Cary), which won that league's championship Founders Cup in 2002.

The Research Triangle region has hosted the Professional Golfers' Association (PGA) Nationwide Tour Rex Hospital Open since 1994, with the current location of play at Raleigh's Wakefield Plantation.

The North Carolina Tigers compete as an Australian Rules football club in the United States Australian Football League (USAFL), in the Eastern Australian Football League (EAFL).

Raleigh is also home to the Carolina Rollergirls, an all-women flat-track roller derby team that is a competing member of the Women's Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA). The Carolina Rollergirls compete at Dorton Arena at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds.

In addition, the Carolina ANZACs cricket and social group is based in the Raleigh area and participates in tournaments throughout the country as part of the Mid Atlantic Cricket Conference, a member league of the United States of America Cricket Association (USACA).

The Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department offers a wide variety of leisure opportunities at more than 150 sites throughout the city, which include: 8,100 acres (33 km2) of park land, 54 miles (87 km) of greenway, 22 staffed community centers, a BMX championship-caliber race track, 112 tennis courts among 25 locations, 5 public lakes, and 8 public aquatic facilities.

The J. C. Raulston Arboretum, an 8 acre (32,000 m²) arboretum and botanical garden in west Raleigh administered by North Carolina State University, maintains an impressive year-round collection that is open daily to the public without charge.

Raleigh-Durham International Airport, the region's primary airport and the second-largest in North Carolina, located northwest of downtown Raleigh via Interstate-40 between Raleigh and Durham, serves the city and greater Research Triangle metropolitan region, as well as much of eastern North Carolina. The airport is a hub for American Eagle Airlines. The airport offers service to more than 45 domestic and international destinations and serves approximately 10 million passengers a year. The airport also offers facilities for cargo and general aviation. The airport authority currently is tripling the size of its Terminal 2 (formerly Terminal C), and is planned for completion in winter of 2011.

See NCDOT ByTrain for more information.

Public transportation in and around Raleigh is provided by Capital Area Transit (CAT), which operates 38 bus fixed routes and a historic trolley line within the city, and also by Triangle Transit (known formerly as the Triangle Transit Authority, or TTA). Triangle Transit offers scheduled, fixed-route regional and commuter bus service between Raleigh and the region's other principal cities of Durham, Cary and Chapel Hill, as well as to and from the Raleigh-Durham International Airport, Research Triangle Park and several of the region's larger suburban communities. TT also coordinates an extensive vanpool and rideshare program that serves the region's larger employers and commute destinations. North Carolina State University also maintains its own transit system, the Wolfline, that provides free bus service to the general public along multiple routes serving the university's campuses in southwest Raleigh.

Government agencies throughout the Raleigh-Durham metropolitan area have struggled with determining the best means of providing fixed-rail transit service for the region. Triangle Transit developed a plan for constructing a self-propelled, diesel-fueled commuter rail system along existing freight rail corridors within the region. Due to low ridership projections and fiscal constraints, this plan was recommended for denial of matching federal funds by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) in 2006. The region's two metropolitan planning organizations appointed a group of local citizens in 2007 to reexamine options for future transit development in light of Triangle Transit's problems. The Special Transit Advisory Commission (STAC) retained many of the provisions of Triangle Transit's original plan, but recommended adding new bus services and raising additional revenues by adding a new local half-cent sales tax to fund the project.

The mountains-to-the-sea North Carolina Bicycle Route 2 travels through the city of Raleigh, as does the Maine-to-Florida U.S. Bicycle Route 1. North Carolina Bicycle Route 5, the Cape Fear run, connects nearby suburban Apex to the coastal city of Wilmington, North Carolina, and closely parallels the route of the Randonneurs USA (RUSA) 600km brevet route. .

Most public buses are equipped with bicycle racks, and some roads have dedicated bicycle-only lanes. Bicyclists and pedestrians also may use Raleigh's extensive greenway system, with paths and trails located throughout the city.

Raleigh is home to the Research Triangle Region bureau of the regional cable news channel News 14 Carolina.

Durham‡ | Raleigh‡

Apex | Cary‡ | Clayton‡ | Fuquay-Varina | Garner | Holly Springs | Knightdale | Morrisville‡ | Rolesville | Wake Forest‡ | Wendell | Zebulon‡

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Source : Wikipedia